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THESE TRYING TIMES

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sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Richard,

We've had an A3 Canon iX6550 for two years, which has just failed after we bought a load of inks. The cost of a new printhead is 80 euros, but they say that it is possible the old printhead may have taken down some of the main electronics. OK, so we won't take the chance, but will order the updated model iX6850. It looks identical, same case & everything, but takes different inks. You definitely can't win in the printer game. :)

Maurice :cool:
 

Smudger

master brummie
Richard,

We've had an A3 Canon iX6550 for two years, which has just failed after we bought a load of inks. The cost of a new printhead is 80 euros, but they say that it is possible the old printhead may have taken down some of the main electronics. OK, so we won't take the chance, but will order the updated model iX6850. It looks identical, same case & everything, but takes different inks. You definitely can't win in the printer game. :)

Maurice :cool:
My wife has an Epson et2750. The inks are supposed to last forever & a day. Not sure how long she`s had it, but it was under £200 when she bought it & she`s very happy not to have to change inks frequently. Printers can be cheap but the inks aren`t!
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
On the subject of ink, when I bought my recent new HP printer (Envy5646) I took up their offer of an ink contract, costs £1.99 a month for fifty pages a month (there are options for those who need more) the machine tells them when ink is needed and it comes in the post before it runs out, together with a prepaid bag to send the empties back.

Works fine for me, I reckon that's the price of less than one cartridge a year, if you need to go over the 50 pages in any particular month they add ten more for £1.00
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Alan,

If the cartridges that came with the machine were full, then I would certainly agree with you, but most times they aren't and there are reports that some come with cartidges only 10% full - not like most hire cars!

Eric,

I print very little apart from when the Gardening Club cajoles me into running another photo competition. My other half does all the printing for the Foreign Residents Association, hence the need of an A3 printer for programmes and posters. The big problem with a contract such as you have is that this printing comes in bursts of perhaps 300 or more copies at a time and then nothing for several months, especially during the pandemic. We've come to a sort of unofficial agreement that every now and then we submit them to them the occasional bill for inks if we provide the paper. So far, I think we're coming out on the right side moneywise, paper still being fairly cheap. :)

Maurice
 

Radiorails

master brummie
During the lockdown period I know many on BHF have picked up with past interests - especially ladies from what I recall.
For some while I have watched religious tv from France but lockdown caused me to consider other known choices. Most were in Ireland, north and south, but lockdown introduced many in England.
However, my preferred places were mostly in Ireland; one in particular, in the late evenings, is in Donegal. Many things are in Erse (Irish) so I have been learning some things in that language. Not an easy task but they say you are never too old to learn. Learning is not the hardest part - remembering what you learned is! :laughing:

So apart from old pubs, many long gone or now derelict, what has anyone else learned? ;)
 

Edifi

master brummie
That Motorbikes exhausts need to be quietend .Being locked in especially the Bank Holidays as been a nightmare. Something should be done about their speed in towns as well.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Alan,

Yes, memory, and that is the crux of many things, and why becoming fluent in a foreign language in old age is almost an impossibility. My other half has persisted for nearly 16 years, but unless you are using the same few words every day for several weeks, you haven't a cats chance! Vocabulary is the killer, and unless you manage to master that, forget about grammar and word endings - the locals can cope with that, and in an island village like this, very few speak 'Athens Greek' anyway.

Orthodox church services are conducted in Ancient Greek, much like Catholic services used to be in Latin. Few understood, and it's much the same here in Crete. Here the attitude is that it's the priest's job to do all the religious stuff, theirs just to attend, and, if they feel like it, to wander outside and have a smoke in the middle of a marriage or a christening. A strange attitude maybe, but there is a certain logic about it!

Me? I get by with the usual hellos, thank yous. etc., and most Greeks who have a smattering of English are more interested in improving their English than they are in getting me to improve my Greek. Added to that is my deafness and their seeming belief that I am a pleasant old eccentric who won't do them any harm. They're very close in their assumptions! :)

Maurice :cool:
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Indeed, Maurice, loss or poor hearing is a definite advantage, as are regional accents. I notice that even in the north of the Irish Republic their accent is more or less the same as Northern Ireland. I suppose it is assumed that it might be different but as far as I have found out many countries, who have their national boundaries do have place names which are cross border names even if the language spoken is different.
Incidentally Latin is still used, but in a minority sense.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
W
Hi Richard, it seems these days that any device connecting to the network gets information somehow. I have an Epson wireless printer which performs well but seems to secretly drink ink when I am not using it. Lately I seem to be using my printer to print out supermarket online shopping lists.

At present I have about 25 passwords and Pin numbers in use and keep them on a password protected flash drive which is backed-up on another flash drive in another location. I also keep a password protected copy located in an obscure folder on the data drive in my computer.

oldmohawk ... :cool:
WOW, very diligent I have about six passwords written down and also under two codes in Outlook!
 

Radiorails

master brummie
So when does old age begin?
That is the $64.000 question.
Once during a lecture by at a training session in the Fire Service, a visiting officer spoke about retirement and job capability. He said when you find you can longer do the job efficiently, you will know.
Similarly when many bodily functions cannot be achieved I guess that is when you become old.
A lady, who I knew, once told me - when she was 99 - that it was no fun getting old. Maybe that is another guide?
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Pedro,

Well, the State Pension used to be called the old age pension by the general public, if not by the powers that be. But otherwise you became "too old to work" or incapable of doing paid employment. But, of course, that is pretty meaningless because in the UK some are still working into their 80s and over here in rural Crete, many are doing manual farming into their 90s, even though they're pretty much doubled up with arthritis and other back pains.

Two months before my 60th birthday, one of my bosses said to me "You're due to retire in a couple of months, are't you?" to which I replied "Not to my knowledge, I can't afford to yet, is it a problem?". "Not at all", he said, "I'll just reset your leaving date to 65". In the event, I retired two months before my 65th birthday, but continued working for them online as a consultant for another 8 years. In the event, the Company was taken over by a Swedish group two years later, and gradually the amount of work pushed my work got less & less, and in the end I chose when to call it a day.

I'm also aware that many people with some years to go before pension age, are struggling to perform and take longer periods off sick. That's when you realise how lucky you are. I'm also aware that there's a lazy few who just don't want to work at any age.

I don't really think that old age is capable of definition, and that feeling does differ from day to day! We all hope to enjoy a few years of our retirement without being incapacitated by ill health, otherwise we would be very disappointed. My own father was still doing a hard manual job at 69 when he collapsed, was taken to hospital, and died the next day. He could not afford to retire, and he was one of the unlucky ones. Those were indeed trying times.

Maurice :cool:
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Coincidentally today I received my regular email from the Mills archive, which suggests a wonderful idea - a Mill of Youth, whereby when you get old you enter a mill and come out young. Only a myth, regretfully, though not too sure if our feminine members would approve, as, apparently, many of these mills were men only , and were referred to as Old Wives Mills !
Nothing to do with Birmingham but interesting, as are many of their newsletters. The web version is at:
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
During the lockdown period I know many on BHF have picked up with past interests - especially ladies from what I recall.
For some while I have watched religious tv from France but lockdown caused me to consider other known choices. Most were in Ireland, north and south, but lockdown introduced many in England.
However, my preferred places were mostly in Ireland; one in particular, in the late evenings, is in Donegal. Many things are in Erse (Irish) so I have been learning some things in that language. Not an easy task but they say you are never too old to learn. Learning is not the hardest part - remembering what you learned is! :laughing:

So apart from old pubs, many long gone or now derelict, what has anyone else learned? ;)
yer...... I used to go and see my..seanathair (Grandad)....when i was young. He lived in county clare. once me and my

daidí..(dad) went in the local for a drink. before i could have my pepsi, i had to give em a song:.:grinning:
 

Richarddye

master brummie
Pedro,

Well, the State Pension used to be called the old age pension by the general public, if not by the powers that be. But otherwise you became "too old to work" or incapable of doing paid employment. But, of course, that is pretty meaningless because in the UK some are still working into their 80s and over here in rural Crete, many are doing manual farming into their 90s, even though they're pretty much doubled up with arthritis and other back pains.

Two months before my 60th birthday, one of my bosses said to me "You're due to retire in a couple of months, are't you?" to which I replied "Not to my knowledge, I can't afford to yet, is it a problem?". "Not at all", he said, "I'll just reset your leaving date to 65". In the event, I retired two months before my 65th birthday, but continued working for them online as a consultant for another 8 years. In the event, the Company was taken over by a Swedish group two years later, and gradually the amount of work pushed my work got less & less, and in the end I chose when to call it a day.

I'm also aware that many people with some years to go before pension age, are struggling to perform and take longer periods off sick. That's when you realise how lucky you are. I'm also aware that there's a lazy few who just don't want to work at any age.

I don't really think that old age is capable of definition, and that feeling does differ from day to day! We all hope to enjoy a few years of our retirement without being incapacitated by ill health, otherwise we would be very disappointed. My own father was still doing a hard manual job at 69 when he collapsed, was taken to hospital, and died the next day. He could not afford to retire, and he was one of the unlucky ones. Those were indeed trying times.

Maurice :cool:
Maurice, I worked full time until I was 71. I stopped in part because the wheels fell off. When I was young never had anything (money) then maybe got smart & did quite well. Always active, cycling, football tennis the at 65 I had my first knee replaced then 6 months later the second then my hip, things I did not know started to hurt. While my hip was being diagnosed they did an MRI on my back. They told me it was not my back (I was thrilled), then they told me, by the way I had a growth on my right kidney 6 cm, it was cancerous and had it removed. I surrender!!
Still doing some consulting work to keep busy but picking my battles!
You never know........
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Richard,

Glad your health problems got sorted in time. Dad died in 1952 of a burst peptic ulcer and peritonitis, and few people die of that today because it gets diagnosed fairly early. But he'd suffered for several years and even his dimwit doctor told him that it was nothing to worry about. Thank goodness for a better medical service today. Now many items of what was major surgery are getting done with local anaesthetics or even none at all and you're in and out very quickly.

I've had my fill of computing now, except as a user, and that's the way I like it. Enjoy life, you've earned it! :)

Maurice :cool:
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
Coincidentally today I received my regular email from the Mills archive, which suggests a wonderful idea - a Mill of Youth, whereby when you get old you enter a mill and come out young. Only a myth, regretfully, though not too sure if our feminine members would approve, as, apparently, many of these mills were men only , and were referred to as Old Wives Mills !
Nothing to do with Birmingham but interesting, as are many of their newsletters. The web version is at:
it makes a change.from going in young and coming out old as i did when i went to the gym.:weary_face:
 
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