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The trocadero

R

Rod

Guest
If Ive told you once Ive told you a MILLION times I dont exagerate.
 
B

bestcover

Guest
;D
Don't cast nasturtiums about the Troc - used to drink there of a lunchtime when I worked at the Rotunda for Legal & General 1971-74
Everyone was friendly but not too friendly ::) ;D :D
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
I heard a similar story to postie - summat about half-crowns being nailed to the floor ;) ... I'd better stop there as I've never crossed the threshold. ::)
 

postie

The buck stops here
Staff member
Talking about the Trocadero, I have read an article about it and thought I might share it with you,
In December 1895 the manager of the Bodega, Mr Henry Skinner was shot and killed by Herbert Allen, who recieved a life sentence. :knuppel2:
The Bodega was refurbished and renamed the Trocadero. ^-^
 

postie

The buck stops here
Staff member
Hello Sylvia
It definately says 5th of December 1895, but you know how these authors tell lies. ;)
 
R

Rod

Guest
I have a Kelly's which shows the Trocadero there in Temple Street in 1903 but earlier in 1897 it is the Bodega Compamy...... The Bodega Company is listed in Yates Street & High Street also.
 

postie

The buck stops here
Staff member
The manager who was shot, Henry Skinner, was the great,great grandfather of the author Nick Bellingham.
He wrote FOUL DEEDS AND SUSPICIOUS DEATHS IN BIRMINGHAM. :coolsmiley:
 

sylviasayers

master brummie
I stand corrected Postie, perhaps my dad referred to it as the Bodega as probably it was still known as that when he was growing up. Just as we refer to old pubs with the names we knew them as not as a new fangled name such as the Slug & Lettuce etc.
 

Peter Walker

gone but not forgotten
On The Bodega name, there must have been a company which bought the lease of pubs in many parts of the country (there were two in Croydon for starters) and used this brand name. The 'Ship' in Croydon traded as the Bodega from 1916 until about 1952, when it was taken over by Henekey's, a respected London chain. The 'Fox and Hounds' was entered in the local directory for one year only as a 'Bodega'. Both pubs reverted to their previous names, and amzingly have kept them to this day.
Back to the Troc, I remember it in the late 1950s. It had a lot of character, some 'theatrical', and it could be that 9/- notes were common currency, but it was a lot nicer than some. The Temple, down Lower Temple Street was quite nice. In the 1970s I was given a pint of beer in there fo standing on a table to replace a busted light bulb. It's still there, but much altered.
Peter
 
J

Jerry

Guest
Aged sixteen I worked at a car dealers called Prestages in Station Street
On a Friday dinner, after we'd been paid me and my mate Gary, also sixteen, used to go in the Troc and have a pint and a Hotpot, very nice too
The "fairies" didn't go in there at dinnertime because it was packed with office and shop workers.

My oldest brother worked behind the bar there for a time in the mid 60s but he's alright now :D
 

Michael_Ingram

master brummie
I went to the Troc several evenings a week in the late 50s and early 60s. I was staggered last year when I went in again to find little had really changed since the refurbishment in the early 60s. In the second wave of hippies; ie after the bohs and beatnicks, there was a tendency for hippies to congregate all evening in the smaller back room and not to spend much on drinks. Consequently, the pub was redecorated and clientele vetted; I was once refused entry wearing a donkey jacket. I was not one of the hippies; I had belonged to the earlier generation of bohs (sorry, I don't know how to spell it; its short for bohemians) but by now I was a respectable art student.
There was a gay group then who generally wore female clothing, handbags and great buffons; one was named Carmen.They were not the sort to make eye contact with. At closing time Carmen and his group often went to the Zambesi coffee bar. I saw them on the way there once In Corporation Street whne someone jeered at them; the jeerers were pulverised.
 

Kevkonk

master brummie
I popped in a pub called 'The Viking' around 1976, for a quick drink. When I mentioned it to my workmates they said it was a pub for the same people mentioned, (terrified to say what they actually said, PC brigade may be watching) I never went there again, but I did not notice anything unusual......... was this the same place?
 

col h

master brummie
Described in Carl Cinns / Laurie Hornsbys song as being where the fairys fly...

Was blown up by the IRA i think in the 1930s.
 
W

Wendy

Guest
I think the Trocadero was probably the first 'gay' pub in Birmingham. I remember it in the early 70's.
 

Ray Barrett

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN R.I.P.
A pal of mine and myself,went in there just once, c1965.we were asked to drink up and leave,by the gaffer.
It must have been discrimination...because we were "normal".
The hair styles and make up would have made many girls jealous.
 
E

Elizabeth Redmond

Guest
I remember going in there with my friend and our boyfriends late 60s early 70s,didn't feel very welcome,and like you said
some of the lads looked better than us, that's out of order lol,we didn't stay and never returned,i dont think they wanted us there
 

Dave89

master brummie
I popped in a pub called 'The Viking' around 1976, for a quick drink. When I mentioned it to my workmates they said it was a pub for the same people mentioned, (terrified to say what they actually said, PC brigade may be watching) I never went there again, but I did not notice anything unusual......... was this the same place?
Hi Kevkonk,

Not the same place, the Viking was on Smallbrook Queensway
between Hill Street and the turning into New Street Station.

Like you, I went in for a quick drink with a friend, and the
preferences of the drinkers were pretty obvious. I do remember
that it was a very good pint though!!.

Kind regards

Dave
 
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