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The Gullett

Dennis Williams

Proud Brummie
Maybe the source was incorrect, I honestly cannot remember something I’ve had on record for many years, sounded a bit like them, but the text was genuine....shall I delete it?
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Maybe the source was incorrect, I honestly cannot remember something I’ve had on record for many years, sounded a bit like them, but the text was genuine....shall I delete it?

Please don’t delete. I will explain why I think the timeline is wrong and it will add to the story. I will also add an interesting clip from 1876 concerning the Improvement Committee.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Not sure if the magazine referred to is Birmingham Faces & Places, which was one of those magazines which came in parts but was meant to be kept and bound. If so then the first six volumes, up to 1894, are available from the Midland historical data site on a dvd. It implies there that the magazine then ceased publication, but perhaps not
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
165609FD-88D2-47B6-8204-21FB3C0D402A.jpeg E09AEE97-90C7-43CC-A78E-8A63D7715AC4.jpeg 3C204CD2-F86F-4257-A117-F1B7B67E438C.jpeg ED4A5511-5D85-4CD1-8892-AD0B016CEE98.jpeg

If the article was dated 1876 it would fit in with the clips from the Birmingham Daily Post of Oct 1876 where Councillor White addresses on the Improvement Scheme. It looks like he had been elected three years before and was a mate of Joe Chamberlain.

Perhaps the most interesting bit is on the 3rd and 4th thumbnails where there are mentions of streets, and a mention of Newtown Row.

In 1879 White gave a lecture on Public Health Past and Present, where he said the reason why Birmingham was a naturally healthy town was the fact that it was situated on a good dry soil which absorbed the moisture.
 

Dave C

master brummie
The Gullett pops up on various threads but I think it's worth it having a thread of its own, being such a notorious place. Here's a drawing (sorry no date) of the smallest shop in Birmingham at the corner with Stafford Street. Looks quite twee, with a gentleman discussing his hat cleaning needs with Mr Jones the hat maker. Never judge a book by its cover ....

Not sure what the lady to the left in the shadows is up to, but she seems to be carrying something heavy (a basket of goods ?) on her back. Viv.

View attachment 125939
My Thompson ancestors were in the Gullet in 1841 having moved from Lichfield, I note the proximity to Lichfield Street which may explain how they settled there. This is the 'nicest' illustration I have seen of the Gullett, do you know where it came from or have any more info!
 
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