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The Edgbastonian Monthly Local magazine

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
On the Union Club Colmore Row Thread there is a reference to The Edgbastonian Local Magazine...

An interesting publication that first appeared in May 1881...
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I recall that Edgbaston was considered to be the favoured place for those wishing to be part of Birmingham's elite, second only, it seems, to Solihull which of course did not have a Birmingham address, but a Warwickshire one.
Curiously two of Edgbastons neighbouring districts had the worst deprivation and squalor to be found in the city.
There is a lot in that magazine to read but glimpses of the Calthorpe Rule becomes evident.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Interesting. The publication seems to have run for at least 26 years. Albeit aimed at a privileged audience, it still contains a lot of interest.

What was the Calthorpe Rule Alan ? Is it something to do with the rules governing the Calthorpe Estate ? Viv.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Interesting. The publication seems to have run for at least 26 years. Albeit aimed at a privileged audience, it still contains a lot of interest.

What was the Calthorpe Rule Alan ? Is it something to do with the rules governing the Calthorpe Estate ? Viv.
Yes, Vivienne, just my way of mentioning it. They did rule the roost it seems.
 

rosie

brummie
I'm from Edgbaston but not the "Elite End"!!

Thanks Pedrocut, I've saved the pdf for later.
rosie.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
From the link to the Edgbastonian article on Middlemore...

“The Calthorpe Estate was careful to keep Edgbaston free of businesses or institutions that might cause a nuisance to the residents.”
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Interesting. The publication seems to have run for at least 26 years. Albeit aimed at a privileged audience, it still contains a lot of interest.

What was the Calthorpe Rule Alan ? Is it something to do with the rules governing the Calthorpe Estate ? Viv.
Terry Slater's book "Edgbaston, A History" gives a lot of examples of how the Calthorpes managed the estate. Apparently all the large houses were in the centre,near the church. The "middling middle class homes" were in a crescent towards the town, while areas for the "labour aristocracy" protected the elite from the denizens of Ladywood and Balsall Heath. Some people tried to open businesses but this was usually prevented . apaprently someone in the very early 1900s had the audacity to try and open a fish and chip shop in the still relatively exclusive Varna Road ! The Council was condemned by the estate for erecting a urinal on the corner of Speedwell Road for the visitors to Calthorpe Park. Presumably Edgebastonians did not visit the park or perhaps did not urinate ( or possibly neither ?)
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The Calthorpe Estate was quite particular in what took place in their area. The Magazine mentioned disquiet over telephone wires and there was considerable resistance to tramcars; their associated wiring and street furniture. The Hagley Road route (34 after 1915) was authorised in August 1912 but did not commence until September 1913 due to opposition. The Hon. Mrs. Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe, owner of the Calthorpe Estate did and so did 97% of the residents also did, according to Neville Chamberlain, the MP for Edgbaston.
Not everyone was totally against the trams. Some suggested Liverpool as a guide, thus Alfred Baker GM of BCTD (as it was then known) suggested a three month experimental period which included the lower deck of certain cars being fitted in a plush manner and designated First Class - with double the fare. Seating was reduced from 28 to 24. The standard rate passengers used the top deck or regular cars. The route ran from Navigation Street to Kings Head, Bearwood, but the First Class cars only traveled as far as Fountain Road. Cars 581 - 54 were new and chosen for the experiment.
It was not a success financially and ended after three months. The Harborne Railway was a strong competitor and Midland Red also ran local bus services there at the time.
However, the trams got their feet (or should it be wheels ;)) in the door and continued until September 1930. By this time BCT had many bus routes along Hagley Road and there was also a degree of competition, as far as Five Ways, with Ladywood route 33 trams.
 
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Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Birmingham Post, February 1977...

By 1800 the first Lord Calthorpe decided to develop his estate as a fashionable suburb and keep control over the character of the area. In first edition of the Edgbastonian in 1881..."Edgbaston is unquestionably the most important suburb of Birmingham."

BD379BBC-A541-42E8-B478-0ADD3BDD4906.jpeg
498E5829-2A02-4C8B-8D84-54DF29DC2204.jpeg
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
This article is from 1977 and the Birmingham Post. I have tried to enhance the picture at bit.

The corner of Church Road and Carpenter Street, Edgbaston.
The crossing-sweeper's seat, but I don't think it now exists.


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