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The Buildings of Birmingham, Past and Present (Second Series)

MariaMe

New Member
The Buildings of Birmingham, Past and Present (Second Series), printed and published by Thomas Underwood, Castle Street, High Street, Birmingham (believed 1870).

A copy of this has recently come into my temporary possession. I am wondering if this is a publication well known amongst Birmingham historians. It contains some nice etchings dating from the early 19th century of notable (and some not so notable) Birmingham buildings and streets, about 23 in all. If they are likely to be of interest to members I'll scan and post them in this thread. Could you give me some indication please?

Chris

View attachment 149638
Yes please
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
There are a lot of barrels of different sizes in the courtyard. And is that a woman drawing water? For laundry ? Or something else ? Viv.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Edward Smallwood is listed in directories as being at The Leather Bottle , 222 High St, Deritend in the 1862 1867editions., but not the 1868 one. Mrs Caroline Smallwood is listed there in the 1858 edition . The Three Crowns is next door at 221 and is listed in the 1862 directory, but not the 1858 or 1867 editions (though he is at the Fruiterer's Arms in Gibb St in 1858 (Remember date ism publication , not survey, date)
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Houses in Edgbaston Street, 1869

Personal note:

Oh, for the presence of Google Streetview so that we could rotate the view and look up and down this street!​
In it we would see a tavern called The Green Man at No.43, run from the 1830s by my great-great-grandfather Isaac Myers (ca 1792-1848). He had come there after having followed the trade of Victualler at No. 11 New Inkleys, possibly at a tavern named The Talbot. Isaac seems to have had premises, and perhaps a home, in Pershore Street, just round the corner, as well. (Isaac's wife Rachel died in 1846 at no. 46 Pershore Street). Isaac himself died at 53 Edgbaston Street - at the age of 56 from a diseased liver, which I suppose is not too surprising - so it does look as though they moved about a bit or possibly owned or rented several properties.​
Isaac's eldest son Maurice (b. ca 1826) took over the Green Man at his father's death in 1848. His youngest, Henry, my great-grandfather, tried to make his fortune by embarking upon the incredible journey to California during the Gold Rush.​
Elsewhere in Edgbaston Street, at no. 19, lived a family of pawnbrokers named Aaron. They were almost certainly related as members witnessed several deaths in Isaac's family.​
It would be interesting to know the street numbers of the premises shown in this sketch if anyone can pin them down.​

TheBuildingsofBirmingham024.jpg
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Aris’s May 1868 shows No 60 advertised To Let...

[Added...May 1867, Order of discharge granted to Edward Thomas Reynolds of 60, Edgbaston Street, Mill Manufacturer.]

E108F651-4833-44F5-AD72-6206DE2242C5.jpeg
 
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Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
In the 1868 Kelly's above Number 61 seems to be occupied by Dennis Ashford, Shopkeeper and George Hemming, Maltster.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
They are lovely drawings though, and in many respects better than a photograph - always in focus!

Maurice :cool:
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
I think this must have been Thomas Instone at no 162, though this may be a missprint as there are Instons who are smiths in Bartley Green at this time
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Malt Shovel Inn, Smallbrook Street, 1869.

TheBuildingsofBirmingham017.jpg

Edited: Street name corrected. Sorry!
 
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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
No . Spent ages trying to find a Sparkbrook St because I only read the post title. But now know there was a Spark St and it had a pub at no 13, only it was called (in 1940) The White Hart
 
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