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Street views of Birmingham c 1870

pjmburns

master brummie
If you download them it is possible to magnify them although they can get pixellated if you magnify too much.

Many thanks for these Mike.
Janice
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
I had never , obviously downloaded any of these myself as I put them on, but have just realised they are only (well last one anyway) 52kb, which does not give much detail. The ones that I loaded were over 300kb, but were reduced by coppermine
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
The fifth panorama is of Ann St, in particular part of the frontage of Ann st that was demolished in the early 1870s to make way for the Council House, going from either 25 to 40 Ann St. The view seems to have been between about 1868 and 1872, as the firm of Joseph Jones, auctioneer at no 33 was listed in the 1872 directory, but not in the 1868 or 1873 directories.. By the time of the 1876 Post Office directory all these buildings had disappeared, to be replaced by the Municipal buildings..
At the far right of the picture is Eden Place, and next to it no 25-26 (listed as 25in some directories and 26 in others), occupied mainly by the RSPCA and the Anti-Contagious Diseases Society. The latter was not formed to act against smallpox and the like, but as a campaign organization against the Contagious Diseases Act, which, from 1864, enabled prostitutes in navy and army towns found to suffer from venereal diseaes to be confined in Lock hospitals, though, conveniently for the male politicians and lawmakers, made no such restriction on male clients. It was at one time suggested that it be extended all over the country, but thebefforts of the above society and its successors saw the Acts repealed in 1886 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contagious_Diseases_Acts) . A coat of arms is visible by the door, presumably that of the RSPCA at the time, though it does not resemble the present version..
Next door at 27 was Heptinstall & Lawledge, file manufacturers, who moved here in 1789 and remained until demolition for the municipal buildings. they are mentioned at
https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=10608.
No 28, clearly numbered on the print, changed hands several times over the period, and could have been R Mann Paperhanging manufacturers, Jabez Wilson, bookseller or Henry Stern, glass merchant. similarly no 29 would have been John Tristram Caswell, hair worker, or Bowdidge & Norton, auctioneers.
No 30 was Adam & co, sewing machine agents, though G.H.Adam was also the registrar of births & deaths.
No 31 was either Suckling & Ormond, auctioneers, or James Cox , poulterer.
No 32 was confectioner Thomas Richards,
No 33 was Thomas Arnold Jones, auctioneer while 33½ , in court 5 behind the building, was James Hughes, french polisher.
No 34 was Miss Mary Jane James, milliner, who took over from auctioneer Earl James, presumably her father or husband, while 35 was either unoccupied or occupied by Henry Stern , glass sign writer.
The name over no 36 shows it to be George Gardner,fruiterer & tobacconist, while next door at 38, under the sign "Irish Porter Stores" was the Bell & Candlestick pub, run by Charles Godfrey.
Adam Smith ,chemist was at no 39, and at no 40 was iether David or Nathan cohen-Spiers (depending on date), pawnbroker, with brass balls displayed.
 

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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Replacing this lost post.


image.jpeg


The last panorama is the north side of Colmore Row roughly between Church St & Livery St. The numbering of Colmore Row varied considerably around this period due to changes such as the absorption of Ann St and Monmouth St into Colmore Row. On the far right is Joseph Lucas, pharmaceutical chemist. Pre about 1875 this was no 4 Colmore Row, in the 1876 directory it was no 1, but by 1878 it was no 13. This view seems to be from between 1868 and 1872. Next to it no 5 had mixed uses probably being either an optometrist or a commercial hotel, while Robert Worrall (the artist seems to have the spelling wrong) at no 6 was a tailor.
Next (no 7) is homeopathic chemist George John Morris, while the impressive no 8 was a surgeon dentist, Frederick Sims. 8½& 9 is Saul & Walter Samuel, Australian merchants. Yet more surgeons occupied no 10, while pawnbroker John Aaron at 11 & 12 possibly provides a source of finance for those visiting all these surgeons (yet another is at no 13 and at no 16). furterh up are a boot & shoemaker ( no 15) and an auctioneer (no 17) while on the corner with Church St is Abraham Allport , tailor.
Soon the buildings would be demolished. A c1870 view of them from down the street , part of a photograph, is given below
 

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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Possibly a false hope, but I don'tt suppose any more of these wonderful street views have been uncovered? Maybe when the Central Library archives were cleared out and moved to the new Library of Birmingham? Viv.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
The original article only had these 6 views. However, on e-bay there has recently appeared a rather expensive book which is listed as "1870 Birmingham buildings past & present.15 folio plates street scenes" ( https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1870-BIRMINGHAM-BUILDINGS-PAST-PRESENT-15-FOLIO-PLATES-STREET-SCENES-/272179579909?hash=item3f5f2acc05:g:J9MAAOSwAuNW7t-O )
They helpfully include copies of some of the plates, and I include them below and on the next post they are :
1. T
he front cover
2.. The smallest shop in Birmingham, The Gullet, corner Lichfield and Stafford Streets. Looks like R.Jones hat maker(?), but cannot find him in directories around 1870
3. Junction of Congreve St & Ann St.
4. High St. (showing St Martins)



 

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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
The remainder but 1:
5. no 60 Edgebaston St and shoeing forge Deritend.
No 60 has name Reynolds on it. In the 1868 directory William Henry Reynolds & Son are steel mill makers at no 60. Close by at 61 is G hemming, maltster and hop merchant, which again agrees with 1858 directory, The forge has Inston over it. In the 1868 directory there is an John Instone at the shoeing forge 162 High St Bordesley.(also an Edward Inston (no e) at the Nelson pub, 22 High St Deritend)
6. Old Houses digbeth. Actually the Leathern bottle pub and three crowns pub, which were next door to each other at 221-222 High St Deritend. The licensee of the three crowns (George Muddyman(?)) does not agree with the 1867, 68, 72 or 73 directories, but he is listed in the Birmingham Daily Gazette as giving up the three Crowns on 4th Oct.1866 .
7. Old Houses, Moor St. there is no indication where exactly it might be.
8. St Martins Lane. With church wall on right, and Swan with Two Necks pub on right. I have seen this before, but the earlier one was a poorer reproduction.
9.`Whateleys, Bennetts Hill. & Old house in High St
All the directories give Whateleys & Whateleys, solicitors as being at 41 Waterloo St. This is only a couple of doors away from the junction with Bennetts Hill, so possibly there was an entrance there also. On closer examination the picture seems to possibly be marked " from sketch in 1830" (despite titel of posting in e-bay). The 1830 Wests directory lists Whateleys in Bennetts hill. Possibly the same house, but different entrance.
The High St shop is labelled T.Weston, haberdasher. I can find no T.Weston in High St. In the 1862 directory there is a T WEston, haberdasher at 25 Temple Row,again the picture is marked "from sketch in 1830" . The 1830 directory gives him in Bromsgrove St, but the 1841 directory at 20 High St.
 

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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
These are beauties Mike. Not seen most of them before. I looked at the book on eBay and it's starting price is £68 - pity I'd have liked that, or at least had the opportunity to browse it. Viv.
 
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