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St Asaph’s Church

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llamafarmer

Guest
Rowan, probably a bit late but here goes... St Asaphs church was on corner of Great Colmore Street and Latimer Street South. Bow Street joined Irving Street with Windmill. Think its still there now but all the courts are long since gone. Birmingham Central Library holds fantastic maps of the area in 1891 on the 6th floor. Hope this helps?
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
The church must have gone as the only one I know in that area is St Cathrine's RC, where my daughter teaches in the school.

Here y'go courtesy of Mr Google... The circular building is St Catherine's church.
 

robert

master brummie
The church along with Windmill st, Latimere st,Lower Cregoe st and Bow st were demolished in the 1960s.
 
L

llamafarmer

Guest
My dad was christened in St Asaphs in the 40's. I was christened in the exact same font but in its new home of St Lukes on the Bristol Road!!! St Lukes has recently moved and is now a few meters away from the site of the old St Asaphs! Confused? You will be!!! I wonder if the old font went with it? Dad has fond memories of playing on the old bombed buildings within the area bounded by wynn st, grant st and great colmore street. I have fond memories of playing in what was left of the old factories around irving st, ernest st and suffolk st. We used to call it the bomb peck. Anyone heard of that name/ expression? Think its now the site of a big car park, behind the Dome nightclub. Ah those were the days! If you stand on the corner of wynn street and great colmore street and look towards the nursery thats roughly where latimer street south and St Asaphs stood
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
And a fine building it was too - rather unusual for a church - more like a Victorian school.
 

rowan

Born a Brummie
It is rather grand isn't it.................but then most churches were built on a grand scale................................and a lot of parishoners money:rolleyes:
 

edgbaston

master brummie
Thanks to everyone who has posted concerning this area of the oldend. I too played on the bomb sites of Wynn st ,Cregoe st ,Bell Barn rd,Bow st and Bell Barn rd where I was born ,happy days.
 

sylviasayers

master brummie
St. Asaph

In the mid fifties I worked for a short time at Boulton & Paul in Bow Street, and remember some of the streets mentioned.
 

edgbaston

master brummie
Thankyou,SylviaSayers for your reply.These sites about about old churches and streets are fascinating and bring much joy thankyou everyone concerned.
 
L

llamafarmer

Guest
edgbaston, you must know my dad John Smith. His older step brother is Dennis Cooper and they used to live in Latimer Street because my great grandma Polly used to look after them while their mother Gladys was at work. Any recollection?
 

edgbaston

master brummie
Hallo llamafarmer I'm sorry but I can't recall anyone of that name.Two families I do remember from Irving St are Dempsey and Rae.
 

edgbaston

master brummie
Hallo again can you remember my uncle Bill Clayton and his wife Irene from Latimer St.Thanks llamafarmer for your earlier question.
 
B

brjobu

Guest
I remember huge numbers of roads in this area being flattened when I lived in the Midlands.

If I remember now they were victorian terraces - and planning laws in those days stated that if you did not have natural light on the starewell a property could be condemned. We are talking demolition as far as the eye could see.

If you are searching census records you have to remember - that even though Edgbaston may have been administered by Birmingham - Edgbaston was classified as Worcestershire in the 1800's - It came under Kings Norton and along with Yardley and Hall Green was counted in Worcs.

I think it took the Greater Birmingham Act of 1911 to rectify.

I have had trouble researching Bellis Street in the slums of Ladywood just up the road only to find this info
 
A

Ann B

Guest
My mom grew up in Cregoe Street, which went up to Bath Row. Latimer street cut across it. Her dad's army papers of 1915 show Cregoe Street Edgbaston. When my mom married at St. Asaph's in 1940, it came under Birmingham.
Here is a map dated 1899, titled Edgbaston Warwickshire, showing Cregoe Street and Latimer Street.

Ann
 
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