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Sheldon Bombing

Bookworm

proper brummie kid
I have a book that is the records of an air raid warden (by John V Abbott). It has maps showing where bombs fell and shows that four high explosive and three incendiary bombs fell on and around Cranes Park Road. There is no indication that any bombs fell on Parkdale Road. I hope this helps.
I remember that the Birmingham Mail published a map of all bombings in the area. It must be available somewhere.
 

OldBrummie

master brummie
At least three bombs were dropped on the dairy farm and "Rover Sports Club" Soccer Field in Lyndon Road. The Soccer Field or adjacent farmland hosted an "AA Battery" and at least one and possibly two Barrage Balloons. Neither the "AA Battery" nor the Balloon(s) were hit and it was assumed the bombs were intended for the Rover Factory and/or adjacent Gas Works, about half a mile distant. Our house at 279 Lyndon Road suffered minor shrapnel damage. The Daylesford Road Estate and Lyndon School sit on the site of the bomb craters. One other incident occurred during the war which comes to mind. One of the Balloons (assuming more than one) broke it's tether and drifted northwards towards the houses in Lyndon Road, dragging its steel cable in a sawing motion across the roof of number 287. The occupants, Mr & Mrs Ken Cook woke from a deep sleep, thinking dreadful thoughts at the commotion going on above their heads.
OldBrummie.
 

Paula112

Brummie babby
My grandparents lived at Tigers Island from the 1930's (Edgworth) There were 2 cottages, theirs was the white one with the lovely garden.
 

Paula112

Brummie babby
My grandparents house. Nell and Alfred Edgworth. Lived there from the 1930's. Lovely cottage, such ashame it had to be knocked down.
 

templartyler

proper brummie kid
I remember them well.....do believe he walked with severe limp.... and is it the case he was involved with road construction? Thanks for posting the cottage image......
 

perry commoner

master brummie
German P o Ws were employed on house building immediately after the war. In my case, the prefabs in hurstwood Road and its environs were built between 1946 to 1948. They were billeted in Sutton Park and arrived for work in Dovedale Road in the back of army lorries. I recall the winter of 1946-47 when we often threw snowballs at the as they left work to go back to their billits. They often returned fire with snow from the back of the truck. There was an army guard but they were not ill-treated. There main work was digging foundations for prefabs and bricklaying the supports for the prefrabricated houses. We moved into one of the in January 1948. The expected life of the prefabs was just 10 years but they lasted over 25 years. The bridge over the stream in Hurstwood Road has a concrete slab commemorating the fact that it was built by Germans in 1946.
 

Paula112

Brummie babby
Yep, that's the one. This photo taken from the back yard of the house. Brings back some memories. All the gates round the house had those horseshoes on!
 

Paula112

Brummie babby
Yes! He did walk with a limp and had a built up shoe. Quite a character and always had a story to tell. He had various jobs and did work on road construction. He worked away a lot and also worked at Abelsons on the Coventry road for a while. Both my grand parents loved their garden and lived quite self sufficiently. You would often see a board in the garden selling tomato plants!
 

BigAlMercMan

New Member
My grandparents lived at Tigers Island from the 1930's (Edgworth) There were 2 cottages, theirs was the white one with the lovely garden.
I lived in the other cottage 1973 to 1990ish when I was a child, I remember Fred now, he used to give me and my sister ice pops over the gate with the horse shoes in it. Good to see photos of the old place, I bet my dad had loads of them!
 

Bills Lad

Brummie babby
We lived at 97 Common Lane, one of the flat roofed houses built 1935. The houses were all of a similar design but varied in size up and down the street. No.97 started as a two bed but was converted into a three bed by a cinder block wall between the old bathroom (bedroom 3) and the W/C and a new bathroom built at the other end of the landing.
The flat roof design was used all over the country, another group was built out towards the Maypole.
A great little house, good times. Mark.
 

Bills Lad

Brummie babby
Thanks Chris.
I was directed to the forum by a work mate. Is there an introduction forum / post? I'll flesh out my background and family history. As I was born in '59 the early Sixties picture posts re-kindle some memories.
 

sheldontony

master brummie
Just out of interest what was the name of the pub in common lane? Was it the Chelmsley or did it have its name changed. My brother in law was a regular.
 

Ian Leggett

master brummie
I knew Common Lane well as it was my cycling route to work at the Yew Tree and Stechford every morning when working at Wrensons.
 

robert

master brummie
It was indeed the Chelmsley,later to be renamed the Cornerstone then Red Rooster and now known as George V
 
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