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Scouts Cubs Boys Brigade Girl Guides Brownies

Jeannie

master brummie
I spent many hours polishing my badges ready for Brownies or church parade over 60 years ago ,like you I still have mine, Happy days , 231st Brownie pack
 

OldBrummie

master brummie
Age plays havoc with the memory so I am having difficulties remembering exact dates and names. I started Cubs sometime in the late 40's, joining 1st Olton. Mom was taken on to be Arkela (have I spelt that right?), Dad joined up as "driver and general go-for" and once we got going my younger brother joined. At the time, 1st Olton (Cubs & Scouts) was located in the grounds of Chapel Fields School, Olton. We subsequently re-located to Olton Park. Mom attended many training camps at both Yorks Wood and Gillwell. After a number of years Mom was asked to move to Yardley District as Assistant Commissioner Cubs and my brother and I moved from 1st Olton to 298th Birmingham. When we moved senior schools (Lode Heath Grammar Stream to Tudor Grange Grammar School) I was asked to assist setting up the Tudor Grange School Scout Group.
I remember we (as a family) spent a day at Sutton Park in 1957 at the Jamboree and were taken aback at the shear scale of the event, especially noting the extreme differences between the American style of camping and the 'bare necessities" of the English lads camp sites. We often spent time at Yorks Wood and also visited Gillwell to deliver and collect Mom when she attended conferences there. A name I remember from Yardley was Arthur Painter (Funeral Director) who was also closely connected to the Scouting Movement. Also the Installs. I can still see many of the people involved but am having a hard time trying to remember names. Here's another memory - sometime in the 1950's - camping at Kibblestone Park in Staffordshire.
Had a lot of fun in those days. Also the odd bad experience. But, I wouldn't change any of it.
OldBrummie.
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
i was a lifeboy at nechells hall n/park rd. and a boy scout at 211 st anns devon stme a scout.png
 
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OldBrummie

master brummie
Attached photo Yardley District Management Team at a Butlins Conference approx 1957.
Harry & Evelyn Adams. Arthur Painter. My Mother. Bert Graham (I think). And although the last one is familiar, I don't recall his name.
1957 or there-a-bouts - The Management Team at a Butlins Conference.jpg
OldBrummie
 

Maryd

Exiled Brummie
I'm very impressed with everyone remembering the number of their pack! I know I left the Brownies in about 1962 and we used to meet somewhere near Dorrington Road Junior School, Great Barr. Every so often for some reason we used to parade with a flag around where Dorrington Road joins Tower Hill - I always wanted to carry the flag in the leather holder thingy, but maybe because I was only a 2nder Gnome I wasn't high enough. Maybe one had to be a 6er? After this I joined the Dance School just up the road from the Clifton Cinema for ballet, tap and acro. The building is still there - I wonder who meets upstairs nowadays...
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
Juniors 100 - The History of the Junior Section

Up until 1917 The Boys' Brigade had only catered for Boys aged 12 and over. However, in September 1917, Brigade Council (the governing body of The Boys' Brigade) setup the Boy Reserves to cater for Boys aged 9 to 12 years of age.

For several years prior to this a number of Companies had started to take in recruits under twelve, the Boy Scouts had done so too from 1916 as Wolf Cubs, and for this reason there were calls to lower the age limit to accommodate these Boys within the Brigade.

The uniform adopted by the Boy Reserves was nautical consisting of a sailor's cap, navy blue jersey and shorts. The NCO's working with them too had nautical ranks as petty officers. In the early days of the Boy Reserves there was a noticeable increase in attendance at Sunday School in those churches which had adopted the section and the number of Companies operating a Boy Reserves quickly started to grow. By 1918 there were more than 1,500 members of the Boy Reserves across the UK, the section continued to grow through the 1920's.

In 1926 The Boys' Brigade Boy Reserves merged with The Boys' Life Brigade Lifeboys and became known as the Life Boys. With this amalgamation membership increased to more than 30,000 Boys in the early 1930's and then to more than 70,000 in the 1950's.

In 1966 the Life Boys became a full part of the Brigade as the Junior Section, a name which was intended to be temporary, until such time as a better one could be thought of and still holds today; although now many often refer to the Boys and Girls of the age group simply as Juniors.

i had a job to google this,kept coming up with soap lol
 

Jeannie

master brummie
This is my old school hat with brownie and guide badges, does anybody remember what the blue one was for, I’m guessing it was brownies as it’s a two finger salute ?
 

Attachments

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
1548849715238.pngMain article: Scout sign and salute




Many Cub Scout sections also use a two-finger salute. The salute was devised by Robert Baden-Powell and originally represented the two ears of a wolf cub, since the original programme was based on Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book.[3] However, Cubs in several national associations now use the three-finger Scout salute used by the rest of the Scout Movement.

The Brownie Promise 1990:
I promise to do my best​
To do my duty to God​
To serve my Queen & my country​
To help other people​
And to do a good deed every day.​
Motto 1990: Be prepared.

The Brownie Guide Motto, prior to 1996, was:
Lend a hand
browies.jpg
 
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Jeannie

master brummie
View attachment 131221Main article: Scout sign and salute




Many Cub Scout sections also use a two-finger salute. The salute was devised by Robert Baden-Powell and originally represented the two ears of a wolf cub, since the original programme was based on Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book.[3] However, Cubs in several national associations now use the three-finger Scout salute used by the rest of the Scout Movement.

The Brownie Promise 1990:
I promise to do my best​
To do my duty to God​
To serve my Queen & my country​
To help other people​
And to do a good deed every day.​
Motto 1990: Be prepared.

The Brownie Guide Motto, prior to 1996, was:
Lend a hand
View attachment 131219
Thank you.
The Brownie promise I made in 1955 was
I promise to do my best
To do my duty to God and the Queen
To help other people every day
Especially those at home
Something I will never forget, Happy days
 

A Sparks

master brummie
When I had to make my promise I fluffed it and said ....God and the King!
This was in the late 50's in the reign of our Queen and I've no idea what made me say that!!
 

pjmburns

master brummie
The promise I made in 1959 also said I would do a good turn every day.
The blue badge was the world badge of the Brownies. I think there was a slightly different one for guides but also on a blue background. Memory hazy as stopped being Brown Owl over 25 years ago:D
 

Radiorails

master brummie
When I had to make my promise I fluffed it and said ....God and the King!
This was in the late 50's in the reign of our Queen and I've no idea what made me say that!!
We have all, I guess, had these moments. For many here we would say it was a 'senior' moment.
I guess that was a 'junior ' one.
One 'junior' moment I often recall, at school, concerned a poor devil who lived in Worcestershire. He was asked to conjugate the verb 'to be'. He started off " I be, you be, he be" - he didn't get any further as he was hauled out and given six of the best! I never thought about until today, but I have the feeling that the master had heard him speaking, knew he would make that silly mistake, consequently using him as a scapegoat. There were good masters and some sadists. Good sense was recognizing that.
 
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