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sayings

Lady Penelope

master brummie
As I took my new trolley out for the first time (see post #379 These Trying Times) I kept recalling a really annoying saying from the sixties 'I had one of those but the wheels fell off'. Don't know who first coined this phrase but it was said if somebody used a big word. Anyone know where it came from?
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Probably from a UK comedian Lady P. - that was when we had real comedians of course, and many of them. Oh! how the country needs people like that today. :laughing:
 

Smudger

master brummie
A friend in need is a pain in the backside
The early bird catches the worm
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder
Neither a lender or borrower be.
People who live in glass houses should wear clothes.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
It seems its first appearance was in 1941 according to a Google search and it relates to death
Gone for a Burton is a British English expression meaning to be missing or to die. The term was popularised by the RAF around the time of World War II. It migrated to the USA quickly and in June 1943

i think you have won a coconut bob:grinning:
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
Gone for a Burton is a British English expression meaning to be missing or to die. The term was popularised by the RAF around the time of World War II. It migrated to the USA quickly and in June 1943

i think you have won a coconut bob:grinning:
I thought it was related to cheap demob suits
 
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