• Welcome to this forum Guest. We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

sayings

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
now here is one i have not heard for ages mom would often comment "shes a nosey cod" :grinning: again i say it..has anyone else heard of this saying and i wonder where it came from

lyn
 

jmadone

master brummie
now here is one i have not heard for ages mom would often comment "shes a nosey cod" :grinning: again i say it..has anyone else heard of this saying and i wonder where it came from

lyn
Perhaps your Mom was being discreet and not swearing in front of the children. She may have substituted an S for a C in the last word?
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
"Legging it". Just been listening to the radio and there was a short piece on "legging" i.e. when barges were "legged" through the tunnels. The horse would be walked over the tunnel and the bargemen/women would push the barge through the tunnel by lying on their backs and using their feet to push against the tunnel roof and so move the barge along. I'd already heard of the way in which barges were taken through tunnels, but hadn't realised it was called "legging it". Viv.
also means To run away. . .scarper
 

Attachments

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
"Legging it". Just been listening to the radio and there was a short piece on "legging" i.e. when barges were "legged" through the tunnels. The horse would be walked over the tunnel and the bargemen/women would push the barge through the tunnel by lying on their backs and using their feet to push against the tunnel roof and so move the barge along. I'd already heard of the way in which barges were taken through tunnels, but hadn't realised it was called "legging it". Viv.
Just read this, sometimes on the Dudley Canal where they do the trips into the old Dudley tunnel, they will offer you the opportunity to leg the boat.

Bob
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
That's the landlubbers saying, here the word 'shepherd' is replaced by ''sailor's'.
The concept of "Red sky at night, shepherd's delight. Red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning" first appears in the Bible in the book of Matthew. It is an old weather saying often used at sunrise and sunset to signify the changing sky and was originally known to help the shepherds prepare for the next day's weather.
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
Lubber is an old word (dating from the 14th century) meaning a clumsy or stupid person.1 This is its sense in the sailing term landlubber, which refers to an unseasoned sailor....... I am no sailor.i get seasick in a pedlo
 
Top