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sayings

Radiorails

master brummie
Ta(i)ters (potatoes) in the mould = cold. Yes, London rhyming slang. London slang is frequently abbreviated too just the first word e.g. apples (apples and pears - stairs).
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Edifi, I seem to remember eeny meeny, macaraca, air-eye dumeracka, chick-a-racka, lollipopa, um. pum, push. But this was when we were doing the 'choosing bit' for teams when you put your foot into the circle.
 

Edifi

master brummie
Seem to remember the last lines were.Out goes 1 ,Out goes 2,out, goes another 1 and that means you.
 

Nico

master brummie
Does anyone remember when girls were skipping a saying , Chic a licka lollypop out goes one.
Mum sad she skipped to Salt Pepper Vinegar Mustard. My mate's Dublin mum sand a rhyme but I don't know the what the firs words were but they sounded like, Nada nada chimney sweep, we never learned the rest because we were useless at skipping. We boys skipped too.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Living in a coastal community many expressions I hear have a marine connection.
Being inebriated can be referred to as "dree (three) sheets (sails) in the wind i.e all over the place and unsecured.
Another way would be to say "' ee be shippin' some watter".
A cup of tea in the rural areas might be known as '' a dish of tay'.
A comment might end with 'daunee knaw' (don't you know).
One saying I never fathomed its origin was 'ees fay' which is an agreement of a comment heard.
'Ma dear zawl' is often used as an exclamation.
'Towing in the tide' was an older custom for dealing with promiscuous women. Men, as usual, got no such treatment.
The 'higher the collar, the lower the church' was often said of Anglican clergy.
Older fishermen would always remind you 'that you zails by permission, Zir'
a person who has 'a lot of ole crams' would be someone fussy.
Older women would be apoplectic if you picked up their teapot, This was likely to 'give them ginger twins'.
A cup of tea, not filled well might cause the comment 'Aw, be the vicar cummin?'
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Living in a coastal community many expressions I hear have a marine connection.
Being inebriated can be referred to as "dree (three) sheets (sails) in the wind i.e all over the place and unsecured.
Another way would be to say "' ee be shippin' some watter".
A cup of tea in the rural areas might be known as '' a dish of tay'.
A comment might end with 'daunee knaw' (don't you know).
One saying I never fathomed its origin was 'ees fay' which is an agreement of a comment heard.
'Ma dear zawl' is often used as an exclamation.
'Towing in the tide' was an older custom for dealing with promiscuous women. Men, as usual, got no such treatment.
The 'higher the collar, the lower the church' was often said of Anglican clergy.
Older fishermen would always remind you 'that you zails by permission, Zir'
a person who has 'a lot of ole crams' would be someone fussy.
Older women would be apoplectic if you picked up their teapot, This was likely to 'give them ginger twins'.
A cup of tea, not filled well might cause the comment 'Aw, be the vicar cummin?'
Praper job m'dear thank ee

Bob
 

Smudger

master brummie
During world war two, the Americans used Cherokee indians for some communications during a battle. This was to confuse the enemy. I reckon they could have hired a couple fo brummies for the same effect!! My brother would have been right for the job.. i can`t understand half of what he`s saying.
 

Dave89

master brummie
Hi Smudger,

I read somewhere that Welsh was also used for the same purpose in WW2,
but I don't know how true this is.

Kind regards
Dave
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
Edifi, I seem to remember eeny meeny, macaraca, air-eye dumeracka, chick-a-racka, lollipopa, um. pum, push. But this was when we were doing the 'choosing bit' for teams when you put your foot into the circle.

oh crikey pen thats just taken me back...we sang it slightly different...eeny mey macaraca...dare die dumeracka sticka racka lollipop a rum tum push...out goes one out goes two out goes another one and thats means you....

where on earth this came from and what it meant i have no idea lol :D:D:D

lyn
 
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