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sayings

Nico

master brummie
Nico, I remember Dad saying the 'Um tiddly um tum....'. Long time ago now!
That had really stirred the brain cells and I can half remember it and I am not sure if it is the same or a bit different. My dad used to sing something just like that. And umpty tiddly eye doh.
Nan sang "Ighty tiddly ighty, tittle me under me nighty, Blighty is the place for me. "
There was another song when my dad used to tickle me and I ued to shout (beg him) to stop it, and he sang "storp yer ticklin Jork (Jock) stop you ticklin, tickle ickle icklin stop your ticklin Jock. "
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Whenever my Dad, who was no handyman, had a difficult job to do involving screws etc, he would always use the Birmingham Screwdriver...pass me the Birmingham Screwdriver...he'd say and I'd give him the hammer....the coal hammer. It always worked

Bob
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Thanks for the responses to my 'aleara' post. There's always been a very strong Irish presence in our city so the O'Leary theory sounds very promising.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Lots of single Irish girls came to the Birmingham area - and presumably other industrial areas - to work in factories during WW2. Many Irish, followed by West Indians and some Asians, were on the buses. The construction industry is always a favourite.
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
I believe the Irish connection goes much further back than that. Not sure when the first Irish people started coming over but perhaps it was around the potato famine? There was mass emigration from that time and it has continued. Although as you say Radiorails, Irish navvies are well known so maybe they came to build the canals. Wasn't that where the name 'navvies' comes from - navigators? Lots of girls came over to train as nurses too.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Indeed., Lady P. 'navigators'. I had overlooked the nurses. Quite a few Irish ladies in my church were from various parts of Ireland - north and south. They, like many folk, retired here for a quieter life. Incidentally one of them was surnamed O'Reilly.
And here is another well know Riley: :D
 

Nico

master brummie
I believe the Irish connection goes much further back than that. Not sure when the first Irish people started coming over but perhaps it was around the potato famine? There was mass emigration from that time and it has continued. Although as you say Radiorails, Irish navvies are well known so maybe they came to build the canals. Wasn't that where the name 'navvies' comes from - navigators? Lots of girls came over to train as nurses too.
My Dublin mate now 89 told me that Ireland kept the UK going with food during WW2 which I had not realised. The Germans dropped several bombs in Dublin including one on his chip shop, to remind them that they were supposed to be neutral. Much further back during the time of the wars in the holyland knights were rewarded with parts of Ireland and England and Wales for their services. One of my ancestors was given Herefordshire I am told, and one was gifted part of Ireland. My favourite French cheese is Munster. A French cheese. I wonder where the Irish connection is? Blimey O'Reilly!
 

adap2it

master brummie
Anybody familiar with the word "donuck"? not sure of the spelling because I'm really not sure if there is such a word, doesn't appear to have a Black Country connection. As kids in Aston, we used the word to describe something to do or get up to, fun or mischief...
Dave A
 

Nico

master brummie
I had a colleague in Brum surname of Geary his nickname was Leary Geary.
Did you ever play that game, O'grady says this and you you copy it on and on and when the one that speak says and this omitting O'Grady, and you do it you're out!
 
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