• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Salford bridge

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Not sure if this is much help, but this is a map accompanying proposals for water pipes by the water authority in 1865, and presumably accurate at that time. Because of the size of the plan (about 2½ft x 1½ft) I could not scan it, so it is a rather poorly lit photo. It does show a building, but it is not named as a pub, and you will see that other pubs such as the Swan, the Queens Head, and the Bell & Cuckoo are named.

waterworks plan new schemme 1865.1A.jpg
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Thank you Mike. I see what you mean about the pubs - It could be that the Erdington Arms wasn't there at this time or the building could be an ale house. It doesn't look as if it was a coaching inn. I don't suppose it was needed - there were plenty of others along the Lichfield Road and the other pubs you mention are not far away.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Thank you Mike. I see what you mean about the pubs - It could be that the Erdington Arms wasn't there at this time or the building could be an ale house. It doesn't look as if it was a coaching inn. I don't suppose it was needed - there were plenty of others along the Lichfield Road and the other pubs you mention are not far away.
Lady P
What is an ale HOUSE(sorry about the upper case, my tablet won't let me do lower case for the word)
Bob
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
An Alehouse was a drinking establishment that did not have a full licence and could only sell beer and . I think, cider. No wine or spirits. People who were allowed these licensees were at first only restricted to those that could afford the licence fee, though this was lightened up later. Initially they were almost all a room , or possibly two, rooms in a private house, though successful ones expanded and often rebuilt. Although they had names used by the local residents, the name was not listed in directories, just the licensee's name and "beerseller" or "beer retailer", though the latter could also include those who were only licensed to sell for consumption off the premises (an "offy"). Similarly they were not picked out specifically on maps.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
An Alehouse was a drinking establishment that did not have a full licence and could only sell beer and . I think, cider. No wine or spirits. People who were allowed these licensees were at first only restricted to those that could afford the licence fee, though this was lightened up later. Initially they were almost all a room , or possibly two, rooms in a private house, though successful ones expanded and often rebuilt. Although they had names used by the local residents, the name was not listed in directories, just the licensee's name and "beerseller" or "beer retailer", though the latter could also include those who were only licensed to sell for consumption off the premises (an "offy"). Similarly they were not picked out specifically on maps.
Mike
Thanks
Bob
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Mike, I think the Erdington Arms is the building shown opposite Copeley Lodge (I called it Copeley House in error in an earlier post). Looking at the following photo I believe that the buildings shown at the rear of the pub are those on your map, what do you think? There was a 'Publican' on the 1841 census in the right place and the name 'Erdington Arms' appears on the 1851 census. Looking at the building the styles are completely different so I expect the front was a later addition.
 

Attachments

Lady Penelope

master brummie
https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/index.php?threads/salford-bridge.45932/page-3

The link by Pedrocut above takes you to the sales blurb for Copeley. I had thought this was where Copeley Lodge was to be found but now realise that it was where Copeley House was built. Both buildings were owned by the Harding family. The Lodge by the father William and the house by his son William Sextus Harding (who son, I believe was William Septimus!). There is a house now used by Liberty House in the same spot - do you think this is the same building? There's a photo of the rear garden on their website. I wonder how long the Lodge was there?
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
When I lived adjacent in Hillside Rd 1962 to 1985 I seem to remember a Remand Home/Borstal top of Copeley Hill, was I correct ? Eric
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Hi Eric, whenever we went to Nan's in Bridge Road we were told never to go up the hill as there was a Borstal up there. Having read about it, I don't think they were particularly dangerous. It seems they were out of parental control and truanting rather than committing serious crimes. I think this was at Copeley House which I mentioned earlier. Must have been lovely views from up there originally when the house was built. I expect they could see right over the valley and take in Erdington Hall etc.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Mike, I think the Erdington Arms is the building shown opposite Copeley Lodge (I called it Copeley House in error in an earlier post). Looking at the following photo I believe that the buildings shown at the rear of the pub are those on your map, what do you think? There was a 'Publican' on the 1841 census in the right place and the name 'Erdington Arms' appears on the 1851 census. Looking at the building the styles are completely different so I expect the front was a later addition.
There is a little bit of memory.....Magicoat, I remember the first time we used it, because it was the future when it came to painting and decorating. Thanks for the memory Lady P. The statement modern by your photo is not supported by the cars in the picture, have you a date for it?
Bob
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Mike, I think the Erdington Arms is the building shown opposite Copeley Lodge (I called it Copeley House in error in an earlier post). Looking at the following photo I believe that the buildings shown at the rear of the pub are those on your map, what do you think? There was a 'Publican' on the 1841 census in the right place and the name 'Erdington Arms' appears on the 1851 census. Looking at the building the styles are completely different so I expect the front was a later addition.
Certainly that is very possible. As I said, it is approximately in the right place, and a later addition would explain differences
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Bob, when I save them to my files I always put a word after the title so that I don't lose another view by saving with the same name. I'd been looking at some from earlier times so this one was the 'modern' one, as in my lifetime. I should imagine it's the early 1960's but I'm not very well up on cars. I'm sure someone will tell me!
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Pedrocut, my husband was just telling me about the Irish workers when I opened your post. Really interesting, thank you.
i worked on the jnk and m6 in1971-3 as a auto electrician maintaning the trucks nd plant for douglas plant.i worked day and night. the money was very good but not a lot of it, one day being exhausted i went to thr loo and slept 24 hour in there lol.what a great job and gang of blokes.:grinning:
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
There was an enormous sewage farm to the east of Salford Bridge, where sewage was spread on fields. this was developed from 1865. The purchase of esome of the land is mentioned in the 150 years thread recently. When treatment methods improved and bacterial filtration was introduced in 1898, the area was considerably reduced.
and it wasl full of rabbits, too we had a field day as kids catching and floging them .you could cut through and come out in aston church rd
 
Last edited:
Top