• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

researching children's homes

Helen G

Almost a Brummie
This is complicated but stick with it......

My sister-in-law's friend is trying to find out more about her Mother and her Mother's family. However, her Mum grew up in a children's home and apart from her father's name and date of birth, Mum can provide no other information.

I have managed to find the father's birth and 1911 census records and death on Ancestry, that was the easy bit.

But, I have no experience of researching Children's Home records. The Children's home she was in is probably long gone, has anyone any idea if and where I might be able to locate any records. Would, for example, they would be held by the local record office or if the Children's Home was part of a charity would the charity still hold them?

Given that her Mum is still alive, should she contact her local Social Services? Would they be able to help?

Any advice fom someone who's done similar research would be very welcome

Thanks
Helen
 

John Young

master brummie
Hi Helen,

Best to post Fathers name & dob & 1911 reference, Folks can then assist your quest (on behalf of Sis-in-law's friend)
Could you also put in her Moms details dob/marriage etc for Her Mother,,the more info you can share the better your responses will be.

Childrens Homes/Charitable Houses/Barnados/Father Hudsons,,,absolute multitude of "options" for searching so Area's/Years are helpful too.
Good luck John
 

Barr_Beacon

The Prodigal Brummie
Dr Barnado's Homes "Ever Open Door" premises at 23-24 Digbeth, pictured in 1900. ("An Ever Open Door For Orphan & Waif Children").
 

Alberta

Super Moderator
Staff member
As the person who was in the childrens home is still living starting with her local social services is probably the best way forward.
They are loathe to give any information to anyone other than the person concerned.
If the lady can remember the name of the home or even where it was it would help our members to give you more information about it and hopefully where to find the records without you having to give us the names of your friends family.
Alberta.
 

JackiePeevor

New Member
As the person who was in the childrens home is still living starting with her local social services is probably the best way forward.
They are loathe to give any information to anyone other than the person concerned.
If the lady can remember the name of the home or even where it was it would help our members to give you more information about it and hopefully where to find the records without you having to give us the names of your friends family.
Alberta.
My friend was taken into 'voluntary care' in the late 50s/early 60s. She was very little so can't remember where she was (the family lived in Oldbury) and requests Staffs and Birmingham social services have drawn a blank. Has anyone any ideas about how she can find out who dealt with her so that she can get access to her file. The only clear memory of the home is a Dalmation dog! Does that ring a bell with anyone?
 

wam

master brummie
This from a quick google search.
The obvious place to start would be national records. There's detail with links to relevant forms at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/children-care/

Some organisations that ran care homes may have separate records and, if you know who ran the one in question you might be able to find them online too. For example
https://www.barnardos.org.uk/former-barnardos-children

Hope that helps. Some government records will be sealed from the general public depending on the age of the record but, for descendants of the person involved, there should be ways around that and, hopefully, the National Archives should tell you who you have to apply through.
 
Top