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Radio

Dave89

master brummie
There are m,any like that, Dave, with their free conversations to a full licence.

Maurice :cool:
Hi Maurice,

In my case I seem to have a mental block at about 15wpm, and I am at the
moment having a final go at improving with the very able assistance of the
radio community here in Norfolk. Fingers crossed!

Kind regards
Dave
 

richardinwales

master brummie
Hi Maurice,

In my case I seem to have a mental block at about 15wpm, and I am at the
moment having a final go at improving with the very able assistance of the
radio community here in Norfolk. Fingers crossed!

Kind regards
Dave
I learned morse aged 11 when I moved in with my step father (now silent key) and he said the best way to learn is to listen, turn your radio on, leave morse on in the background and do something else, read a book or something. One day you'll be sitting there listening and "a switch will flick in your brain" and all of a sudden you understand the code...thats exactly what happened with me; it really is a case of putting in the hours of letting your brain associate the sounds with words/letters. The hardest part for me was learning the 'text speak' hams use.

I had a break from ham radio lasting forty years between age 20 and 60 when I retired and took up the hobby again. It took a while to get my speed back up to scratch. These days I'm a happy CW QRPer and get a kick out of DX on a few Watts.

Setup shop/shack in the garden shed back in May, running a little Chinese SDR rig (Xiegu G90) through a G5RV and X-80 vertical and its great fun. When the loft conversion is finally finished the loft will be my shack and I'll rig up with something like an ic-7300 which seems a firm favourite with hams these days and the G90 will be my mobile rig...its the best £400 I've spent in years, superb value for money.

Keep listening, keep safe and 73.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
I learned morse aged 11 when I moved in with my step father G5IW (now silent key) and he said the best way to learn is to listen, turn your radio on, leave morse on in the background and do something else, read a book or something. One day you'll be sitting there listening and "a switch will flick in your brain" and all of a sudden you understand the code...thats exactly what happened with me; it really is a case of putting in the hours of letting your brain associate the sounds with words/letters. The hardest part for me was learning the 'text speak' hams use.

I had a break from ham radio lasting forty years between age 20 and 60 when I retired and took up the hobby again. It took a while to get my speed back up to scratch. These days I'm a happy CW QRPer and get a kick out of DX on a few Watts.

Setup shop/shack in the garden shed back in May, running a little Chinese SDR rig (Xiegu G90) through a G5RV and X-80 vertical and its great fun. When the loft conversion is finally finished the loft will be my shack and I'll rig up with something like an ic-7300 which seems a firm favourite with hams these days and the G90 will be my mobile rig...its the best £400 I've spent in years, superb value for money.

Keep listening, keep safe and 73.
i have loads of fun with a BaoFeng BF-F8 :grinning: a very usefull handy.73
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
Learning morse is like riding a bike, once you have mastered it you never forget. I was aircrew wireless operator for 8 years in the RAF 1948 - 56 but because of a weak eye was 'grounded' for the last 12 months and worked in a signal centre at Bletchley where we took messages down on a typewriter at 25 wpm (about 18 wpm during my flying days) I doubt if I could do that speed now. Incidentally if you were a w/op in the RAF you could apply for your 'Ham' licence without taking the test Eric
 

richardinwales

master brummie
i have loads of fun with a BaoFeng BF-F8 :grinning: a very usefull handy.73
I've got a the earlier one U5RV IIRC and that works well, lets me into a couple of repeaters but to be honest 2m is dead round here.

On the Xiegu G90 I've been playing with CAT control/FT8 digital and thats a bit of fun. My shed has served me well, started off running off a battery but put power in there for the rig and a heater but I am looking forward to the loft being finished. It would have been done by now but covid etc coming along put a stop on the works so I'm looking at end of March/April now. Its a good hobby, cheaper than golf ;)
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
I've got a the earlier one U5RV IIRC and that works well, lets me into a couple of repeaters but to be honest 2m is dead round here.

On the Xiegu G90 I've been playing with CAT control/FT8 digital and thats a bit of fun. My shed has served me well, started off running off a battery but put power in there for the rig and a heater but I am looking forward to the loft being finished. It would have been done by now but covid etc coming along put a stop on the works so I'm looking at end of March/April now. Its a good hobby, cheaper than golf ;)
and her 2m has had it. i use 70cms. and hf. uhf 446. i have a marine license as well.. my 570dge has done me well, i bought a blackbox yaesu 897,that is good. the kenwood 2000 was poo so i sent it back,it was deafer than i am lol. 73 de pete
 

richardinwales

master brummie
My G5RV is half wave and does OK, the vertical (only £60) skips the UK, I might work far north of England on a good day, in 7 months I've only worked two other Welsh stations using it but...it does a grand job working Europe, east coast USA, Russia, Scandinavia on voice and I've worked Brazil, Mexico and north Africa on CW and Japan on FT8.

People think radio hams are a bunch of 'anoraks' well, I double qualify as I also collect old Primus stoves LOL. Primus stoves were born in Sweden but the UK had some very very good manufacturers of Primus type paraffin stoves and some were based in the brum area; two of the best known was Samuel Heath & Sons and George Marris & Co. My auntie Lillian was a solderer for Samuel Heath during WW2 so may well have made one of the old stoves I own :)
 

Dave Riley

master brummie
Back in March I posted a link in a thread called "These Trying Times - 2020" to a excellent site called "American Radio History". At the time I thought some folks may find loads of interesting material to peruse to pass the time. The site has now changed it's name to "World Radio History" and I thought this would be an excellent and more appropriate thread to remind you all of it's existence.

There is thousands upon thousands of radio and music books and magazines going right back to the start of broadcasting, also, there of loads of British books and magazines relating to radio, music and electronics. All these may be downloaded to read at your leisure, I myself have spent many a happy hour going through this excellent site bringing back memories of yesteryear.

Here is the link....

https://worldradiohistory.com/index.htm

I must say a big thank you to all the folks at World Radio History who have spent thousands of hours and and a lot of personal expense at creating such a fantastic collection of radio, electronics and broadcasting history.

I hope you all enjoy.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Dave,

Yes, that is an excellent site and I have used it quite often myself when doing technical research though I wasn't aware of the name change. Thanks for reminding me to take another look.

Maurice :cool:
 
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