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Radio

Radiorails

master brummie
I never heard Radio Caroline.
However, most of the programmes in this thread are BBC ones and usually of a humorous or musical nature. As far as the humorous ones are concerned the principal thing I remember was that they were for family listening - rather than much of the present day humour which verges on the offensive to many. Yes, there were camp comments and innuendo in many of them but in the days when sexuality was not continually forced upon everyone, including children, risqué comments were not always understood by younger people and often went over their heads.
The musical element was just that. Most radio music was easily followed, generally the words were understood (sometimes sang along with) and usually easy on the ears - even if it was not ones preferred kind of music. The musicians were just that; there were no repetitive sounds principally manufactured by electronics. Compare that with today where you have, in many instances women screaming at you - hardly easy on my ears I must say - maybe younger people can sing along with it, but, I suggest, only in parts. There is some good music these days but, by and large, less evident. The music of WW2 and for a few years after, I am certain, helped keep up people spirits at the time as did the comedy shows and those of an informative nature - Woman's Hour, The Archers etc. There are still some very good programmes on radio - anyone with poor vision will know and appreciate that.
I wonder how many BHF Members scroll down the tv channels below 1 (BBC1) into the 700 series where the radio programmes are?
 

Smudger

master brummie
I never heard Radio Caroline.
However, most of the programmes in this thread are BBC ones and usually of a humorous or musical nature. As far as the humorous ones are concerned the principal thing I remember was that they were for family listening - rather than much of the present day humour which verges on the offensive to many. Yes, there were camp comments and innuendo in many of them but in the days when sexuality was not continually forced upon everyone, including children, risqué comments were not always understood by younger people and often went over their heads.
The musical element was just that. Most radio music was easily followed, generally the words were understood (sometimes sang along with) and usually easy on the ears - even if it was not ones preferred kind of music. The musicians were just that; there were no repetitive sounds principally manufactured by electronics. Compare that with today where you have, in many instances women screaming at you - hardly easy on my ears I must say - maybe younger people can sing along with it, but, I suggest, only in parts. There is some good music these days but, by and large, less evident. The music of WW2 and for a few years after, I am certain, helped keep up people spirits at the time as did the comedy shows and those of an informative nature - Woman's Hour, The Archers etc. There are still some very good programmes on radio - anyone with poor vision will know and appreciate that.
I wonder how many BHF Members scroll down the tv channels below 1 (BBC1) into the 700 series where the radio programmes are?
Alan, I must confess i haven`t listened to the radio since Adolf Hitler was a mere lance corporal. Even in my car i never have the radio on, wouldn`t be able to hear it anyway with the wife yakking in my ear ):) As for the screaming female singers i agree with you, & as for rap, it rhymes with crap & some of it incites violence. I do like to watch tv, but not the soaps, they`re all a bunch of miserable sods. There`s enough real misery in the world without having to watch fake misery on tv. I`m just a grumpy old grandad as my grandkids tell me:(
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
I never heard Radio Caroline.
However, most of the programmes in this thread are BBC ones and usually of a humorous or musical nature. As far as the humorous ones are concerned the principal thing I remember was that they were for family listening - rather than much of the present day humour which verges on the offensive to many. Yes, there were camp comments and innuendo in many of them but in the days when sexuality was not continually forced upon everyone, including children, risqué comments were not always understood by younger people and often went over their heads.
The musical element was just that. Most radio music was easily followed, generally the words were understood (sometimes sang along with) and usually easy on the ears - even if it was not ones preferred kind of music. The musicians were just that; there were no repetitive sounds principally manufactured by electronics. Compare that with today where you have, in many instances women screaming at you - hardly easy on my ears I must say - maybe younger people can sing along with it, but, I suggest, only in parts. There is some good music these days but, by and large, less evident. The music of WW2 and for a few years after, I am certain, helped keep up people spirits at the time as did the comedy shows and those of an informative nature - Woman's Hour, The Archers etc. There are still some very good programmes on radio - anyone with poor vision will know and appreciate that.
I wonder how many BHF Members scroll down the tv channels below 1 (BBC1) into the 700 series where the radio programmes are?
Can't get Jazz FM in North Devon on DAB radio, so have to pick it up on the TV, so many radio channels there. I drive to work every morning with Radio 4 Extra on and get the comedy hour, most of the programmes are gentle, funny and well written, Hancock, Doctor at Large, TIFH, Rays a Laugh (these two are lunchtime programmes), The Men from the Ministry and of course The Navy Lark. However in a strange sort of way, the double entendres from I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again and Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne are probably much nearer the limit than some of the obscenity and crudeness that passes for humour nowadays and I love it when the continuity announcer warns us that the programme was made some time ago and may now include matter not considered suitable in this day and age. I got a shock when I scrolled down the TV channels and found myself in the 900 series, they was something different, unfortunately couldn't stay, my wife does not like football as I had said it was a sports channel.

Bob
 

Nico

master brummie
If we wanted bread on a Sunday we used to get it from Hardings Bakery up by the Swan, Yardley.
That reminded me, Suttons and Pails bakeries always baked on a Sunday afternoon and the smell.........wafting over the allottments.
 

Nico

master brummie
We had gran over for Sunday lunch too. I liked that. She never stopped talking. Dad got a tape recorder with 2 spools and taped her. OOOh - wear! She said, I don't talk like that do I?
 

Nico

master brummie
Alan, I must confess i haven`t listened to the radio since Adolf Hitler was a mere lance corporal. Even in my car i never have the radio on, wouldn`t be able to hear it anyway with the wife yakking in my ear ):) As for the screaming female singers i agree with you, & as for rap, it rhymes with crap & some of it incites violence. I do like to watch tv, but not the soaps, they`re all a bunch of miserable sods. There`s enough real misery in the world without having to watch fake misery on tv. I`m just a grumpy old grandad as my grandkids tell me:(
I remember having a car with no radio. We had one with one once with stiff black push buttons and you had to hold it while you pushed as it almost pulled the dashboard off and the reception was useless. Whistle whistle. No new fangled speakers. "Turn it up dad"' No it puts me off" snaps mum. (I agree about the soaps). We had a big heavy red radio in the house you could kill someone with it. Dad took that in the car. On his lap; He wore jeans. Mum drove. And on Sundays off we went picnicing in the summer months. Sandwiches in an old biscuit tin.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
I remember, as a nipper, hearing "Much Binding in the Marsh" being sung by Richard Murdoch and somebody else. I think it was a comedy programme.
My best radio experience was in 1964, when I was posted from Germany to Colchester. My new regiment was in a camp which had large WW2 wooden buildings and was well within range of all the Pirate radio stations. In those days everybody seemed to own a little "tranny" and during a visit to the Gun Stores, for example, you'd hear Radio Caroline, the Signal Stores would perhaps be listening to Invicta or Radio London and so on. There seemed to be music everywhere. Great times.
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Maypolebaz, the other bloke was Kenneth Horne. He seems to pop up everywhere on the radio. It was set in an RAF station and recorded all the problems they had with supplies after the war. I remember the tune but I can't remember the programme.
 

Maria Magenta

master brummie
I remember having a car with no radio. We had one with one once with stiff black push buttons and you had to hold it while you pushed as it almost pulled the dashboard off and the reception was useless. Whistle whistle. No new fangled speakers. "Turn it up dad"' No it puts me off" snaps mum. (I agree about the soaps). We had a big heavy red radio in the house you could kill someone with it. Dad took that in the car. On his lap; He wore jeans. Mum drove. And on Sundays off we went picnicing in the summer months. Sandwiches in an old biscuit tin.
We also took a radio with us in the car, an A40. We had a rather nice picnic set which included a spirit stove and a kettle with a bamboo handle, and I can still remember the smell. Tomato sandwiches used to feature!
The picnic set was left in a garage and the case rotted. Dad was a bit upset as he'd had it for years.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
Maypolebaz, the other bloke was Kenneth Horne. He seems to pop up everywhere on the radio. It was set in an RAF station and recorded all the problems they had with supplies after the war. I remember the tune but I can't remember the programme.
Thanks ! I had a feeling the title was something to do with the location.
Kenneth Horne, how could I forget ?
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Maypolebaz, I think the word 'bind' is still used sometimes, as in 'a bit of a bind' when something isn't going according to plan.

Alan, I can't see the link - could you post it again please?
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Maypolebaz, I think the word 'bind' is still used sometimes, as in 'a bit of a bind' when something isn't going according to plan.

Alan, I can't see the link - could you post it again please?
Apologies, I omitted to post it. anyway it is my post (#192) now.
 

Dave89

master brummie
Alan

Re your earlier post on Radio Nederland Wereldomroep, I wonder if you remember the presenter
Eddie Startz, and the tea ceremony. Somewhere I still have a letter from him and a QSL card.
Strange thing is, it seems like last week, rather than 60 odd years ago.

Kind regards
Dave
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I most certainly do Dave. Good morning, good afternoon or good evening, wherever you are!
I first came cross Eddie, The Happy Station and RNW in 1955. He knew my area of Devon having visited it. I did have their programme schedules and cards but I guess after all this time they have gone. I do have many QSL's from all over the place. Interestingly I only have one letter that I recall and that was from Li Po Teh at Peking (Beijing). I used it in 1985 as proof I had lived at my home in 1965! :D
One thing I cannot remember about The Happy Station was whether Het Wilhelmus (the Dutch national anthem - incidentally accepted as the oldest anthem in the world - was played? Or am I confusing it with the Dutch local transmissions from Hilversum.

 

Dave89

master brummie
Hi Alan,

I'm in Scratby on the Norfolk coast, and its blowing a gale today, and raining,
so I have dug out this which I hope will bring happy memories of the 'Happy Station'
and remind us both of how good those times were on shortwave.
The Binnie Hale brought back memories too!

Kind regards
Dave

Scan0002.jpgScan0003.jpg
 

Radiorails

master brummie
This may bring back memories of waiting for the start of the show. Bells from one of the singing towers of Holland, in this instance, as far as I remember, in the City of Breda (Noord Brabant) which is in the south near the Belgian border.
Lots about the RNW here, did no one else listen to shortwave back in the pre tv days? Radio means you can listen and do other things, tv, is far more restrictive.
 
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sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Alan,

The only station I actually listened to was the Voice of America Jazz Hour. There used to be an annual paperback publication called something like the Short Wave Listeners Handbook, which listed the frequencies and other details of commercial stations all over the world, so my only other interest was DX and trying to locate some of these rarer stations, and collecting the QSL cards, of course! Some of these powerful European stations were a nuisance to me as they tended to operate close to the frequencies of the low-powered stations in places like South America.

The annual publication seems to have ceased and the last similar title I found was last revised in 1997.

Maurice
SWL.jpg
 
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