• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Poem

Jules65

master brummie
When the light of day is waning
And there's Stillness in the air,
We think of the lads so uncomplaining,
Fighting for freedom and all that's fair.

We think of the lad's that have done their bit,
And are now lying wonded in France,
We see their lips move in silent prayer,
That they may be given another chance.

Then we think of the soldier's dear ones,
Whom they have left at home,
And we pray that the lads will be spared to come back,
To Mother and Friends and Home.

And last we think of those who have died,
Through wounds, in this terrible war,
But we pray to God that we all shall meet,
Above on the heavenly shore.


I found this poem in a small book of my great Aunts. It was an Album full of blank pages and her friends wrote poem's and drew wonderful pictures in it. It was given to her Christmas 1914. This poem was signed E. Guest and dated 22nd March 1916.
 

Graham

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
Lovely Jules and reminded me of how my grand dad must have suffered before he died in 1918 as a POW so far from his very young loved ones.:( My mum, his daughter, was born in 1911.

Graham.
 

Jules65

master brummie
I too thought it was a lovely but very sad poem. The man who gave my Aunt the album which the poem is taken from was a Dan Dickinson who served in the 4th Loyal North Lancs. I have just found out that he died on 7th April 1917. He is buried at Croston (St. Michael) Church Yard Extension. They were engaged and I knew that he died and she remained a spinster all of her life. It really brings it home to me, reading the passages in this album, how it must have been. There is definetely a sadness in lots of the passages.

My great Uncle also died in a POW Camp in Stendal, Germany. He served with the Kings Rifles.

Here is one of the illustrations (which I think is wonderful - it is so detailed) and I think probably sums up the feeling at the time. Stiff upper lip understated British humour!

View attachment 28840
 

Jules65

master brummie
Cadeau - just checked. My great uncle Alfred Reginald Mason was also in the 9th Battalion of the King's Rifles. He died on 6.10.18 and his buried in Berlin South-Western Cemetery.

Hopefully you can now see the attachment.
 

Graham

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
Cadeau - just checked. My great uncle Alfred Reginald Mason was also in the 9th Battalion of the King's Rifles. He died on 6.10.18 and his buried in Berlin South-Western Cemetery.

Hopefully you can now see the attachment.
Jules, what a coincidence, they may even have known each other!(yes, we can now see the attachment, thanks), Graham.
 
J

jan hedger

Guest
Poignant words of inner thoughts - thank you for sharing. I have written some poetry related to WW1, I shall post them one of themon here later.
I do study poetry of the period - it was an important time for poetry, poets spoke of the truth and deep inner feelings - spoke with grit and honesty.
The words in your poem are beautiful in their sad thoughts.
Jan Hedger
 
Top