• Welcome to this forum Guest. We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Passages, Alleyways Gulletts and Snickets of Old Brum

Elaine Hemming

knowlegable brummie
Are we related Elaine? My grandfather was Thomas William Gibson and he had a son of the same name I think one of my dad's brothers.
Hello Eric, yes my Grandad father's name was also Thomas William Gibson, my grandfather other siblings were Frank. Harry, Leonard and Florence. they are from the Ladywood Area of Birmingham
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
Have we done this one here?

Crick Lane Handsworth runs from Rose Hill Road by King Edwards Grammar School across Broughton Road, Holly Lane (see b & w photo) and ends at Hamstead Road (see modern map). It has been around since the early 1700's when it used to be the access lane to Crick farm, but now it mostly serves as garage & rear access to all the properties that have been built over the last 300 years (see modern image).


132683132684132685
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eric Gibson

master brummie
Close Elaine but not quite I think, my dad was Leonard and he had a brother Frank and a sister Ada...…...and more and they were from Aston, maybe a looser link somewhere in there.
I have a family tree on the net if you would like to compare.
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
This is a copy of a post I have just made on the Origins of the Brummie Accent thread in response to a discussion about the word Snicket

I had not heard the word snicket before. When I was describing the Back-to-backs to a friend from Liverpool she said 'so there's no ginnel behind them?'.

This is a quote from Wikipedia.
Informants from the north west of England speak up in favour of the snicket, a noun of uncertain origin first recorded by the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in a Victorian glossary of the dialect of the Lake District. Another term, ginnel, is also widely used in Greater Manchester and parts of Yorkshire.

I once lead a walk through what I have called the 'alleyway' and at the end of the walk, the walks programme organiser in thanking me said. 'We have walked through some narrow gullies and some long gullies but that was the longest, narrowest gulley we have been through'.
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
Midlandslass

Not that I have photos of either, but do you mean Seymour Street Balsall Heath that ran from Sherbourne Road to Belgrave Road or Seymour Street that ran from Albert Street to Masshouse Lane in the City?
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
We were in Shaw's Passage the other day en route for The Warehouse Cafe in Allison Street. It was absolutely tipping it down but at the junction of the two roads someone had planted silver birch trees and hung bird feeders from the branches. Even in the rain these were full of sparrows. It was a lovely sight! Unfortunately many of them flew away as we tried to photograph them.

I have been down there several times but only just noticed the Digbeth Community Garden which I hadn't seen before. It looks sadly neglected at this time of year but I'll keep my eye on it when the spring comes.
 

Attachments

A Sparks

master brummie
Is there still a health food shop under the cafe? I remember there was one in Allison Street.
The was a Friends of the Earth office next door.
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
It's all changed round now A Sparks. The shop is where the Friends of the Earth Office was and the cafe is where the shop was on the ground floor (for which I was truly grateful - those stairs were so steep!). This was the first time we'd been since the changes and will definitely go again.
 

batmadviv

master brummie
This is a copy of a post I have just made on the Origins of the Brummie Accent thread in response to a discussion about the word Snicket

I had not heard the word snicket before. When I was describing the Back-to-backs to a friend from Liverpool she said 'so there's no ginnel behind them?'.

This is a quote from Wikipedia.
Informants from the north west of England speak up in favour of the snicket, a noun of uncertain origin first recorded by the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in a Victorian glossary of the dialect of the Lake District. Another term, ginnel, is also widely used in Greater Manchester and parts of Yorkshire.

I once lead a walk through what I have called the 'alleyway' and at the end of the walk, the walks programme organiser in thanking me said. 'We have walked through some narrow gullies and some long gullies but that was the longest, narrowest gulley we have been through'.
Ginnel and snicket were interchangeable in north Yorkshire when I lived there. Alley way was never used except by other Brummies/midlanders.
 

Elaine Hemming

knowlegable brummie
Hi Tony Barlone, as far as I know that we had no relatives in Buck Street, I did not know all of my Dad's side of the family, like his Aunts Uncles or Cousins - But my Dad his parent and brothers and sister lived in Jesmond Grove Pype Hayes Erdington - regards Elaine - sorry for the late reply
 

Elaine Hemming

knowlegable brummie
Close Elaine but not quite I think, my dad was Leonard and he had a brother Frank and a sister Ada...…...and more and they were from Aston, maybe a looser link somewhere in there.
I have a family tree on the net if you would like to compare.
Hi Eric, sorry for the late reply as I have been really busy at work and sometimes not managed to get on site. - is it possible that I could have a look at your family tree on the Gibson link. to see if any names on there, could be linked to the names i have. Many thanks Elaine.
 

mw0njm.

brummie dude
1579069250738.pngthere was an old factory down shaws, it had a yard outside. kept in the yard were dirty old hotdog carts that were scattered around the city of night, the sellers would wheel the cart out light the gas, and get the makings. buns etc out of a shed. the gravy/fat was still in there from last night ,even longer,then put on a white coat and off they went selling. the men were down and outs, making a few bob....This went on every night. we watched them. through the window. the rats were having feast on the old stale buns and beefburgers left around. the carts were owned by a ice cream company,, no names
so i hope you enjoyd it if you bought a hotdog or beefburger from these in the 70s:mask:
 
Top