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Our childhood toys

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Interesting that in actual fact although there were five Buntline specials, there is no proof that Earp ever carried one. Ned Buntline was a dime novelist who wrote Westerns making heroes of people like Earp, Cody et al and commissioned the guns from Colt. Some other firearms manufacturers did make long barrel guns and apparently in the fifties Colt did extend the length of their Navy revolver. There is some interesting history on Google. When I was doing my national service, I had to fire off and condemn some weapons, amongst them was a Webley revolver, so I tried quick drawer and fire. An almost impossible task, landed on my back twice, jarred my arm and just missed my foot. Nuff sai


Bob Davis
before the ban in 1996. we had members at the club with all sorts of hand guns. i fired everything from 22.short to 45.
the worst was a smith and Weston. 44 magnum.hand gun the recoil was like being kicked by a horse.it went all through me down to my boots. it jumped up into the air. The colts were tame compared to that.thing.
Colt Buntline - Wikipedia
 

Spargone

master brummie
There was a series of model hand guns in half-section given away with, possibly, Shredded Wheat. They were all the same metallic blue plastic and about two inches long. Something else to hang on the walls of our baronial halls, alongside our big cat collection!

The 'Lone Star' brand in its prime must have out-done James Bond's 'Q' in its range of weaponary! They didn't just do 'Cowboy' guns, my brother had a decent looking 'Luger', possession of which now would probably get one locked up.

As an infant I took a simple pop gun to school for 'The March of the Tin Soldiers'. Those guns were quite common and cheap. Most of the other boys had the same sort of gun but one brought in some sort of fantastic ray gun! My 80+ great-grandmother accused me of hitting her with the pop gun, she had the bruises to prove it. I protested my innocence as she was on the far side of the room and the popped cork was still attached to the string holding it to the gun!
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
a bush xtal set. .hours I spent listening to loads of stations all at once.and garbled. but i thought it wonderfull
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
Interesting that in actual fact although there were five Buntline specials, there is no proof that Earp ever carried one. Ned Buntline was a dime novelist who wrote Westerns making heroes of people like Earp, Cody et al and commissioned the guns from Colt. Some other firearms manufacturers did make long barrel guns and apparently in the fifties Colt did extend the length of their Navy revolver. There is some interesting history on Google. When I was doing my national service, I had to fire off and condemn some weapons, amongst them was a Webley revolver, so I tried quick draw and fire. An almost impossible task, landed on my back twice, jarred my arm and just missed my foot. Nuff said


Bob Davis
Bob I hope you're not trying to ruin the dream , your quick draw was obviously the wrong gun . See World Fast Draw championships
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Interesting that in actual fact although there were five Buntline specials, there is no proof that Earp ever carried one. Ned Buntline was a dime novelist who wrote Westerns making heroes of people like Earp, Cody et al and commissioned the guns from Colt. Some other firearms manufacturers did make long barrel guns and apparently in the fifties Colt did extend the length of their Navy revolver. There is some interesting history on Google. When I was doing my national service, I had to fire off and condemn some weapons, amongst them was a Webley revolver, so I tried quick draw and fire. An almost impossible task, landed on my back twice, jarred my arm and just missed my foot. Nuff said


Bob Davis
you got the stance wrong.... draw cock it on way out put hand over chamber and fire.
doc holiday sawed his Barrel short.and had no front sight to catch on the draw
 

Nico

master brummie
We had a Minibrix set in Miss Green's class in Mapledene Infants (the class following the reception class). The studs were wider at the ends so the bricks had to be made of rubber. I remember them as being quite hard to put together or pull apart. My friend, a year younger, had a Bayko set. It was quite complicated to use as you had various lengths of thin steel rod that were inserted vertically into a plastic base plate. You had to choose the right length for the height that you intended to build. At the start of the build it almost looked like scaffolding. There were various plastic panels with different textures and colours that slid between the vertical rods. After a certain height you were supposed to put in a layer of metal strips, like very tiny Meccano strips, that tied the rod ends together. It was possible to make quite nice scale buildings if you had all the parts but it took a lot of care.
Sometime between seeing both these systems, neither of which I had, my older friend had a different building system. It consisted of little ceramic bricks, about the size of a 2x4 Lego brick but not as tall. You were supposed to mix up a paste 'cement' to hold them together. When you wanted to use the bricks again you soaked the building in water. My friend's dad was a builder with Dare's so maybe he was training him up!
I had Sticklebricks
 

Spargone

master brummie
I expect every age is the 'golden age' for each generation, after all they know no better, but I think I did quite well. There were a lot of quality toys available at pocket-money prices. We quickly worked out the merits of tin-plate, die-cast and plastic materials, a useful life-skills training, the right material for the right job.

Something else that I had was independence. Just about every newsagent sold a range of decent toys and there were many newsagents within walking distance, (and of course I was allowed to walk!). I knew in advance what I might want to have, a few pennies would buy a catalogue or price list that could be eagerly studied and plans made!

I wasn't restricted to the newsagents either, a trip to the Post Office, a postal order, clipped coupon or short note and a few days later 'Master S' was the proud owner of a new purchase, (sometimes to the consternation of the parents!).

I'm sure many of my generation sent off for the 'Seebackroscope' or 'Throw Your Voice' instructions, complete with the dangerous looking 'swazzle' or that clear-plastic 'ten-in-one' device, (most of which were variations on magnifiers, plus a mirror and compass).

But then today's youngster just raises their voice above the noise of their computer game and says, "ALEXA! Buy me a ...", and it all goes on a parent's card?
seebackroscope.jpg
 

ade

master brummie
Not so much a toy but I had this exact same radio off my grandparents for Xmas 1964, a sign that I was growing up. Unfortunately, I found it before it had been wrapped and had to pretend I was surprised when I opened their present on Xmas Day. Like the fascination of having a torch I was endlessly turning it on and off and re-tuning the stations until the on off switch failed! It was my first and last transistor radio.

View attachment 140268
that radio would have been every young boys dream, I had a radio given to me at a very early age and now have this obsession with old vintage radios, I remember as a kid, my dad started his own business in a small shed in the garden and I used to sit for hours with him listening to the cricket commentary from far away from Australia, or radio five football night. I'd take radio over T. V any day of the week
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
I expect every age is the 'golden age' for each generation, after all they know no better, but I think I did quite well. There were a lot of quality toys available at pocket-money prices. We quickly worked out the merits of tin-plate, die-cast and plastic materials, a useful life-skills training, the right material for the right job.

Something else that I had was independence. Just about every newsagent sold a range of decent toys and there were many newsagents within walking distance, (and of course I was allowed to walk!). I knew in advance what I might want to have, a few pennies would buy a catalogue or price list that could be eagerly studied and plans made!

I wasn't restricted to the newsagents either, a trip to the Post Office, a postal order, clipped coupon or short note and a few days later 'Master S' was the proud owner of a new purchase, (sometimes to the consternation of the parents!).

I'm sure many of my generation sent off for the 'Seebackroscope' or 'Throw Your Voice' instructions, complete with the dangerous looking 'swazzle' or that clear-plastic 'ten-in-one' device, (most of which were variations on magnifiers, plus a mirror and compass).

But then today's youngster just raises their voice above the noise of their computer game and says, "ALEXA! Buy me a ...", and it all goes on a parent's card?
View attachment 140320
1577873466878.png
 

Ray T

master brummie
that radio would have been every young boys dream, I had a radio given to me at a very early age and now have this obsession with old vintage radios, I remember as a kid, my dad started his own business in a small shed in the garden and I used to sit for hours with him listening to the cricket commentary from far away from Australia, or radio five football night. I'd take radio over T. V any day of the week
Before I could stretch to a transistor radio, as boy I made myself a crystal set from parts bought from a shop in town, whose name I can't remember. Having soldered the few components in accordance with a circuit drawing I had, and spread a thin wire around my bedroom ceiling to act as an aerial, I could twiddle with the little tuning device and sit up late at night listening to Radio Caroline and other stations on my little bakelite headphones. Does anybody else remember their crystal set?
 

ade

master brummie
Before I could stretch to a transistor radio, as boy I made myself a crystal set from parts bought from a shop in town, whose name I can't remember. Having soldered the few components in accordance with a circuit drawing I had, and spread a thin wire around my bedroom ceiling to act as an aerial, I could twiddle with the little tuning device and sit up late at night listening to Radio Caroline and other stations on my little bakelite headphones. Does anybody else remember their crystal set?
Those crystal sets were a good learning curve for boys and girls interested in radio, at the time, to actually go to a shop and bring home some components to build your own radio, then hear it working would have been wonderful. I still think radio is an amazing invention, to hear voices and music coming through airwaves and to be able to listen to it anywhere you like at anytime
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Before I could stretch to a transistor radio, as boy I made myself a crystal set from parts bought from a shop in town, whose name I can't remember. Having soldered the few components in accordance with a circuit drawing I had, and spread a thin wire around my bedroom ceiling to act as an aerial, I could twiddle with the little tuning device and sit up late at night listening to Radio Caroline and other stations on my little bakelite headphones. Does anybody else remember their crystal set?
see #344.....i built a lot from bits.1577875150089.png
 

Spargone

master brummie
.Having soldered the few components in accordance with a circuit drawing I had, and spread a thin wire around my bedroom ceiling to act as an aerial...
Picture rails, (remember them?) were good for that. I bought a box of single-core insulated cable from Civic in Sheldon for use as an aerial. It was possibly sold just for that purpose. I never saw cable like it elsewhere, the insulation was quite thick and it very strongly smelled of town gas.
Most of my radio parts came from advertisers in Wireless World, a magazine that my dad had bought from his late teens. There was a very good shop across the road from Lewis's that I visited a few times in the late 1960s. Wasn't Hurst Street home to a few electronics-based shops? Henry's, Bi-Pre-Pak, Electrovalue and Maplin (customer 2457) were some of my postal suppliers.
 
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