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Old street pics..

alan bartlett

master brummie
Night services left the city on the hour.
Bob
Was the fare 4 shillings, that would be in the 60,s. 5a Corporation Street to Perry Common Ring? We used to board at Rackhams, opposite Lewis,s store. Gave that up, You could wait 50 mins for the next bus and it would turn up full, another hours wait for the next one. Deep joy.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The NS night services of BCT commenced, experimentally for six months, in 1947. This was extended soon to twelve months. Seeming to be successful a further twelve months experimental period was approved. 1949 appears to be when the services became official.
The initial fares, for some time, was 6d. (two and a half new pence). This was a flat fare , one stop, many or the whole route. Later it was 7d , then eight and increased as time went by. A special night service ticket was issued.
Many of the longer routes did not reach the daytime terminii as the route was served by just one bus and it has to be within a hour for the round trip. Cross country services, like the 29A only went to Kingstanding from the city, the Hall Green area was served by the 37. Some went outside the city boundary such as the 73 to Carters Green and the 85 to Spon Lane, Smethwick. All route number were prefixed by the letters NS. Tram and trolley buses did not run at night, motor buses took their place such as NS2 Erdington, NS36 Cotteridge, NS 94 Sheldon etc. Midland Red, who ran the Scott Arms service for BCT had only one route the NS119.
For those living at the extremities of the city or even outside the boundary it often meant a decent walk, but at least a good part of the journey was possible by public transport. Besides in those days people walked far more then than most do today.
 

devonjim

master brummie
For those living at the extremities of the city or even outside the boundary it often meant a decent walk, but at least a good part of the journey was possible by public transport. Besides in those days people walked far more then than most do today.
In 1950's I used to have to make a choice, to use the NS14 or NS58, where I lived was mid way between the two .I could walk from The Good Companions or from Lea Village.
 

Edifi

master brummie
Up to 2011 my brother after drinking in the Witton Arms caught the No 11 to the Bulls head at Stechford got of and caught the last bus the 11 o'clock from Bham to the Glebe.This he did for 20 years.
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
Picture 4484 page 225.

It’s a Triumph Herald coupé. It had the same profile as the convertible, but a fixed top rather than a hood. I had one for a while, winning the local motor club’s production car trials trophy in it once, before it fell apart. Mine was a 1200, think this one has the 948cc engine. They did not make a Vitesse version iirc.
 
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Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Was the fare 4 shillings, that would be in the 60,s. 5a Corporation Street to Perry Common Ring? We used to board at Rackhams, opposite Lewis,s store. Gave that up, You could wait 50 mins for the next bus and it would turn up full, another hours wait for the next one. Deep joy.
I thought 56 to 59 about one shilling, used to cost about two Bob for me to get home from the Plaza those nights that I had to go straight home. The worst moment of course was escorting the young lady to her front door, which was opened by her Dad , and you knew you were not going to get a coffee, turned round, started to walk back to the bus stop to see the bus going past before I could get to the bus stop.
Bob
 
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