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NewStreet Birmingham

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Some more photos taken on New Street.

Apple & Oasis (ex Midland Bank and Midland Hotel - now Burlington Hotel and Arcade).



Buffet Hut at King Edward House. Seen from the end of Union Passage. Was the Yard of Ale (site of 1974 Birmingham Pub Bombings as the Tavern in the Town).



A frame at Medicine Bakery. With loafs of bread.

 

Richarddye

master brummie
The drawing in post 600961 by Vivienne14 is New Street. Note the Hen and Chickens Hotel in left foreground. Here's another view of the same building from a print of a Samuel Lines 1833 drawing published in RK Dent's 'Making of Birmingham' p336, 1894.
View attachment 140024
OMG, I love the old Brum drawings/pictures...…...Its like a wonderful history lesson. To think I grew up with this and took SO much for granted, now I can't get enough of it!
 

Richarddye

master brummie
Some more photos taken on New Street.

Apple & Oasis (ex Midland Bank and Midland Hotel - now Burlington Hotel and Arcade).



Buffet Hut at King Edward House. Seen from the end of Union Passage. Was the Yard of Ale (site of 1974 Birmingham Pub Bombings as the Tavern in the Town).



A frame at Medicine Bakery. With loafs of bread.

Ell, what is a Buffet Hut?
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Re post first photo #281. I see the HSBC building is still as faceless as I remember it. Surprised it’s still there given the redevelopment of the station. Viv.
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Do you mean the bank or the Premier Inn hotel above it? All that's changed is the odd bit of cladding and new signs.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
The Bank Ell. But of course it has a good companion in the Ramp ! Just seems odd that the bank and the ramp weren’t developed along with all the other Station redevelopment. Probably something to do with land ownership. Viv.
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
They re-paved the ramp and changed the glass railing section when New Street Station was done up at the time.



Not sure why Network Rail didn't have the section above the shops recladded.
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
They re-paved the ramp and changed the glass railing section when New Street Station was done up at the time.

Not sure why Network Rail didn't have the section above the shops recladded.
Probably because they do not own the building. It was never part of New Street Station. It was previously the Exchange Building
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
This 1829 drawing doesn’t seem to have been posted before. Looks like the artist drew this view from the junction with High Street, looking along New Street towards Christ Church.

The stagecoach seems to have stopped to the left, so must have been an inn there (on the corner ?), hence the barrels (name of Phillips above the door). Presumably the road to the left was a continuation of High Street, leading to and joining Digbeth and the markets. To the right would be High Street leading to Dale End. Viv.

287A7E16-5AD7-4EC5-8D0D-23DECD566375.jpeg
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
This 1829 drawing doesn’t seem to have been posted before. Looks like the artist drew this view from the junction with High Street, looking along New Street towards Christ Church.

The stagecoach seems to have stopped to the left, so must have been an inn there (on the corner ?), hence the barrels (name of Phillips above the door). Presumably the road to the left was a continuation of High Street, leading to and joining Digbeth and the markets. To the right would be High Street leading to Dale End. Viv.

View attachment 142580
The detail in the drawing is marvellous and a guide to the clothing of the people of that era. Noticeable are the boneshaker bike and the woman's parasol/umbrella and the artist predated L S Lowry with the two dogs. I suppose before it became Zissmans, it was Top Hats R Us. On looking again, I realise the boneshaker is a hoop

Bob
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
You can just make out the Hen and Chickens portico along on the left. Samuel Lines drew this a few years later and an engraving was made in 1833. See earlier post #260.Viv
 

Radiorails

master brummie
A delightful drawing to be sure. Interestingly that is before the most famous (in my view) and splendid building in the city was under construction. I refer, of course to the Town Hall, on which construction began in April 1832 and opened in October 1834. The date of 1829 is when the drawing was published so it may be a year or so earlier. Good to see the street had decent pavements - they look better that some I know. ;)
 

Richard McNeill

knowlegable brummie
This 1829 drawing doesn’t seem to have been posted before. Looks like the artist drew this view from the junction with High Street, looking along New Street towards Christ Church.

The stagecoach seems to have stopped to the left, so must have been an inn there (on the corner ?), hence the barrels (name of Phillips above the door). Presumably the road to the left was a continuation of High Street, leading to and joining Digbeth and the markets. To the right would be High Street leading to Dale End. Viv.

View attachment 142580
The Inn is behind the corner building. It is the Swan Hotel. The Swan was a terminus for coaches travelling between Birmingham and London. The coach we see post No.293 appears to be waiting outside the New Street entrance to the Swan. Here's a plan of the site in 1850, together with a drawing of the Swan Hotel frontage and yard from 1829 (same date as the drawing in post No. 293).
New St High St Jcn Swan Hotel Plan 1850.jpgNew St High St Jcn Swan Hotel 1829.jpg
 

Richard McNeill

knowlegable brummie
This 1829 drawing doesn’t seem to have been posted before. Looks like the artist drew this view from the junction with High Street, looking along New Street towards Christ Church.

The stagecoach seems to have stopped to the left, so must have been an inn there (on the corner ?), hence the barrels (name of Phillips above the door). Presumably the road to the left was a continuation of High Street, leading to and joining Digbeth and the markets. To the right would be High Street leading to Dale End. Viv.

View attachment 142580
The shop on the left appears to have 'Phillips' written above the door. This is No.89 High Street. In Robson's 1839 directory (10 years after the 1829 drawing), and in Kelly's 1845 directory, No.89 is occupied by Thomas Phillips' Wine and Spirits Merchants.
 
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