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New unseen photos of brum

redken

master brummie
You know Astoness, this entire collection of photographs are pictorially magnificent. They bring back memories from an era that we all were part of from those days long gone now. Thanks so much for posting them. God bless you.xx
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
You know Astoness, this entire collection of photographs are pictorially magnificent. They bring back memories from an era that we all were part of from those days long gone now. Thanks so much for posting them. God bless you.xx

thank you redken...not only is it a pleasure to post them but i am learning all the time...

lyn
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Like it Phil. Only another 500, 454 photos to do on the Forum! (Made that number up) . Viv.
Hi Viv, Lyn's photo reminds me of 1953 when the rather drab times of the 1940s suddenly became colourful with many shops in the city putting up decorations for the Coronation as can be seen in the view of Lewis's in post #4. It seemed to be a time of optimism and the future looked bright and the memories led me to get my colouring pad out and do some colouring but have to confess I pinched the blue sky and clouds from Lincolnshire ....
...... I'm looking forward to the next lot of photos ....
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
thank you redken...not only is it a pleasure to post them but i am learning all the time...

lyn

Lyn

What I find about photos is that they refresh our memory and can sometimes point out that not all that we remember is true. I agree that collecting photos can be educational and there is nothing better than finding a photo of Birmingham that you have never seen before, especially if it of an area that you did not know, consequently we can learn something from each photo we collect. Especially if when posted here on the forum it is discussed and analysed by the membership of the forum then we all end up that little bit more knowledgable about our City.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
could not agree with you more phil...forums such as this is the place to be if you want to learn about our city...i love it when we are trying to pin down a location as well...our members are like dogs with bones...they dont give it up easily lol

lyn
 

jimbo

master brummie
With apologies
Just to prove an old nerd is alive and well in Leamington Spa and that "Big Healeys" are my specialist BORING subject
The car in the photo is definitely an Austin Healey 3000 (post 1959) due to its front disc brakes, curved windscreen and wind up windows. A BN/1 was a 100/4 (4 cylinder 2.4 litre) circa 1954 which was developed to a BN6 (6 cylinder 2.6 litre) 1957/58. In 1959 it became the "3000" BN/7 and BT/7 -2 /4 seats - (6 cylinder 2.9 litre). I think the car in photo is a post 1962 BT/7 or BJ/7.
Thats enough
Glassman, never be afraid to share your knowledge, where would us less informed members be if no one shared their expertise.
 

philm1310

New Member
Thanks for this. When I was at junior school some mates and I appeared in a production by the Midland Music Makers here.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
IMG_1102.jpg

Not sure where to put this one as I can't find any mention of Marshall Osborne. Anyway this is a new old picture from the Evening Despatch of June 1939...Is that a young boy with a fag in the front row?
 

Smudger

master brummie
View attachment 110176

Not sure where to put this one as I can't find any mention of Marshall Osborne. Anyway this is a new old picture from the Evening Despatch of June 1939...Is that a young boy with a fag in the front row?
It`s almost certainly a fag. Those kids at the front don`t look old enough to be workers ( or smokers ) Not so many people wearing hats either, even some of the women are hatless. All got their Sunday best on. Oh the joy of Sundays past. No shops open, a chance to wear your best gear & hopefully impress the girls. Get the guitar out & look like a plonker trying to find a chord that didn`t sound like demented cat. Simple times.
 

pjmburns

master brummie
Don't forget the school leaving age in 1939 was 14 so the workers might have been just 15 when the photo was taken.
 

paul stacey

master brummie
I'm not sure there ever was a legal limit for smoking, unlike drinking, school boys as young as 11 used to smoke at my school in the 50's early 60's, could get "caned" , for it, but they could be served in all shops by us.Paul
 

adap2it

master brummie
I'm not sure there ever was a legal limit for smoking, unlike drinking, school boys as young as 11 used to smoke at my school in the 50's early 60's, could get "caned" , for it, but they could be served in all shops by us.Paul
I started smoking at age 9. Rolled up paper at first, looking in the mirror and blowing smoke. Then moved on to our mom's dog ends, which were real small. There was a shop in Summer Lane, close to Milton St, where you could buy 1 cigarette at a time...I got caught smoking at school (on Saturday morning detention) and got caned in front of the whole school. I quit smoking 20 years later.

Dave A
 

paul stacey

master brummie
Most shops by us sold fags in one's and two's, as well as 5's and10's, never smoked at school, started in the army , (mostly due to the stress, and everyone else smoking) stopped in 1975.Paul
 

Katie

master brummie
Thanks for these pictures, Lynn, lovely memories, especially the West End. Like Morris, spent most Saturday nights there. Still dancing!!!
 

norfolk brummie

gone but not forgotten
In 1945, not only could you buy just one cigarette (hate the word 'fag', spent too much time in the States), but I would buy that from a tobacconist, for my father, when I was still fourteen.

Like Paul, I never smoked until I was posted to Germany in 1952. Players & Senior Service were a shilling for twenty. Won so many at poker, that I started to smoke them. Never a big smoker, I would go for weeks without smoking a cigarette. Gave the habit up completely in 1970, aged 37, forty seven years ago. Never a big smoker, nasty habit. My wife still smokes!

I recall friends aged 12 & 13 at school, in the forties, who smoked, and yes, they received the cane, if caught.

Eddie.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Neither my late wife nor my current other half have ever smoked, so I consider myself lucky in that respect. I didn't start smoking until after I came out of the RAF into the coffee bar era, where almost everyone seemed to smoke. Nevertheless, I never smoked more than seven a day, and most of those had one puff taken and then burned their way into the varnish on the end of some establishment's piano keyboard. As my wife was an asthmatic, that made it easy to enforce a no smoking rule in the home which applied to both visitors and one of my teenage sons - the other two never smoked. I never liked smoking outdoors and my habit would never have survived in today's environment anyway.

One or two schoolboys out of the 700 at my senior school occasionally smoked behind the bike sheds, but it was such an insignificant problem that I never heard what happened to any offenders if caught. Unlike Eddie I was based in Shropshire in the RAF and by the time I'd paid my coach fare home every weekend, I didn't have the money to buy cigarettes! Never gambled - I don't think I would have been any good at it - and spent most of my spare time either practising piano or in the amateur radio club. I haven't smoked now for well over 40 years and certainly don't miss it.

Maurice
 

nickcc101

master brummie
I've never smoked but was caned at school and a letter sent to my Mother saying I a had been caught smoking. Unfortunately I was standing with a group of older boys who were smoking so also got the blame.
 

Smudger

master brummie
I suspect that like most smokers i started at an early age. There were no health warnings back then, & even if there were, i doubt if we youngsters would have taken much heed. We were rebels, with a ciggie hanging from the corner of the mouth, just like the film stars we saw at the cinema. During my illustrious army career, i received 7 days in the glasshouse. We were allocated two ciggies a day, & boy did we look forward to that heavenly smoke. I haven`t smoked for 30 years, & i don`t think i could afford to start again at todays prices.
PS. I`m surprised we haven`t been threatened with the cane for going off topic.!!
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
I'm not sure there ever was a legal limit for smoking, unlike drinking, school boys as young as 11 used to smoke at my school in the 50's early 60's, could get "caned" , for it, but they could be served in all shops by us.Paul
Being a once hardened smoker from an early age, I always thought that there was no age limit for smoking, but the legal age limit to purchase cigarettes was over 16 years of age.
 
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