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Nechells Park Road.

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
wished the manor house was still there phil...you may recall my rellies once owned it.only got that half demolished photo of it...so far:D

lyn
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
I'm pretty sure I have posted this one before, which was obviously taken shortly before demolition.

Nechells Nechells Manor House Chattaway St By Cook St   .jpg
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
yes thanks phil thats the one you posted for me a few years back...only one i have to date

lyn
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
This is on ebay for £32, ridiculous price, don't know whereabouts in Nechells Park road, and I walked that road 2 or 3 times a day for 5 yearsView attachment 107143
John Knight said he didn't know where the photographer stood to take the £35 photo of Nechells Park Road. Well, extreme left is Butlin Street leading down to Aston Sheds. Extreme right was a yard of back-to-back houses where my friend Raymond lived. Straight ahead is The cross roads of Aston Church Road (r)) and Holborn Hill. I saved lots of my pocket money at the Post Office by the pilar box by buying saving stamps with a photo of young Prince Charles on the front.
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
Another nice 1920's photo of Nechells Park Road, this time looking back toward Bloomsbury Street from Aston Church Road. Just out of sight on the left would have been the not very old Nechells baths and to the right would have been Ernest H Lloyd Beer Retailer which would later become the Villa Tavern.

Nechells Nechells Park Rd 1920.jpg
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
This is on ebay for £32, ridiculous price, don't know whereabouts in Nechells Park road, and I walked that road 2 or 3 times a day for 5 yearsView attachment 107143
Right! Something went wrong with my earlier comment on this photo of Nechells Park Road. So... extreme right of the photo is Butlin Street leading down to Long Acre which was my address, 204. Butlin Street was where the entry to our back yard was found. Extreme right of the photo was a yard of back-to-back houses. Nigel Mansell's mother ran the shop on the left hand corner in the years I lived there and sold wool and sewing materials. She also ran a grocery shop further into the photo on the corner of Holborn Hill. Two doors away from the wool shop was a Post Office where I regularly bought saving stamps at a tanner a piece. Young Prince Charles was featured on the stamp face. There was no interest on my savings. That could be one reason why he is rich and I am penniless. Malvern Hill Road still runs between Holborn Hill and Butlin Street and can be just made out on close inspection of the photo. BMTR had a depot in Malvern Hill Road and hundreds of tyres were stacked around the yard. We had fun climbing those towers when no adults were around.
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
Another nice 1920's photo of Nechells Park Road, this time looking back toward Bloomsbury Street from Aston Church Road. Just out of sight on the left would have been the not very old Nechells baths and to the right would have been Ernest H Lloyd Beer Retailer which would later become the Villa Tavern.

View attachment 115658
Extreme right of the photo was a grocery shop that Nigel Mansell's mother ran. Further along that line of shops was one run by Harry Evans which was a mix of electrical and hardware goods. My dad caved in to my pestering after I had seen a two-wheeler bike taking up prime position in Evans' window. He paid twenty-five pounds for it and I loved it. I had it for years, a black-framed Phillips Sports with red mudguards and white-walled tyres. I passed my cycling proficiency test on it at Salford rezzer. It underwent a major transformation when a school friend pinched it and stripped it in the hopes that it was unrecognisable. I did know my bike, though, when I saw him on it. He was arrested at Bloomsbury Police Station. I kept the bike for three more years.
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
I'm no transport buff, but I think it's pretty obvious that this photo taken in 1922 on Nechells Park Road shows one of the first 12 trolleybuses (no11) to operate in the Birmingham area as the Old Square to Nechells was the first route for this type of transport in 1922 and I believe trolleybuses on this route lasted until 1951. As I say I'm not a fan or as buff of public transport but I'm sure we have people with such an interest who will either confirm or debunk what I have said.


Nechells Nechells Park Rd 1922.jpg
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
I'm no transport buff, but I think it's pretty obvious that this photo taken in 1922 on Nechells Park Road shows one of the first 12 trolleybuses (no11) to operate in the Birmingham area as the Old Square to Nechells was the first route for this type of transport in 1922 and I believe trolleybuses on this route lasted until 1951. As I say I'm not a fan or as buff of public transport but I'm sure we have people with such an interest who will either confirm or debunk what I have said.


View attachment 115675
What a superb picture, no debunking, it would be very ungentlemanly and unfair, yes the trolley bus system finished in 1951, but Nechells actually finished on 30th September 1940 without warning, they were withdrawn overnight. For a good précis of the Birmingham system, and why this occurred read Peter Gould at:
www.petergould.co.uk/localtransport_history/fleetlist/birmingham3.htm
These 12 trolleybuses were made by Railess of Rochester with bodies by Roe of Leeds. Interestingly enough as the various manufacturers battled for the City's business, Leland produced a trolley bus with a dummy radiator and it looked very like the post WWII HOV buses.

Bob
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
phil your photo on post 29 shows stanley road on the right...the far corner is where the old vicarage stood..it was demolished to make way for st clements nursing home..

lyn
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
The top and bottom of Nechells Park Road, it seems all you needed to do in those days to get a crowd into the street was to produce a camera.

Nechells Nechells Park Road .jpg Nechells High Park Rd.jpg
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
thats very true phil...the camera must have been quite a novelty back then..nice photos
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
In the first photo, the house next to the shop I had a mate who lived there in the mid 60's thinking about it the last time I saw him must have been about 1968.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
The top and bottom of Nechells Park Road, it seems all you needed to do in those days to get a crowd into the street was to produce a camera.

View attachment 115698 View attachment 115699
People preferred their postcards/photographs animated back in the day, once a photographer appeared, yes he did attract a crowd and unless it was an accident, a celebration or other historic event where the crowd was automatically present, the best way to dress up a street scene was with some children. Of course the problem in Edwardian times was getting them to stand still while the shot was taken. All the postcard collectors will have identical cards, one with all girls on, one with a boy/boys on and occassionaly a horse or cart or the odd local inhabitant. Pre 1920 cards are far more interesting than those taken with 'instant modern cameras.
Bob
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The key logo of the Birmingham Municipal Bank was to be seen on doors each end of the saloon in Birmingham's tramcars. The door was usually shut behind the driver to prevent people trying to alight from the wrong end of the tram. I don't know if this was a feature on all of Birmingham's trams but it seemed to occur on many of them.
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
Right! Something went wrong with my earlier comment on this photo of Nechells Park Road. So... extreme right of the photo is Butlin Street leading down to Long Acre which was my address, 204. Butlin Street was where the entry to our back yard was found. Extreme right of the photo was a yard of back-to-back houses. Nigel Mansell's mother ran the shop on the left hand corner in the years I lived there and sold wool and sewing materials. She also ran a grocery shop further into the photo on the corner of Holborn Hill. Two doors away from the wool shop was a Post Office where I regularly bought saving stamps at a tanner a piece. Young Prince Charles was featured on the stamp face. There was no interest on my savings. That could be one reason why he is rich and I am penniless. Malvern Hill Road still runs between Holborn Hill and Butlin Street and can be just made out on close inspection of the photo. BMTR had a depot in Malvern Hill Road and hundreds of tyres were stacked around the yard. We had fun climbing those towers when no adults were around.
Sorry! The second line should read as " extreme left is Butlin Street". Sorry folks!
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
I remember my little metal savings bank with the key on the front Viv. It had a lovely wiggly handle and you could put money in but had to take it to the bank to get any out (which in my case was a very good idea as there would have been nothing in it!)
 
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