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Muntz George Frederick (1794-1857)

DJKH

New Member
Hi
I think you will find that was his son Philip Albert who had the house at Clifton, he was made a Baronet and died in 1909.
 

DJKH

New Member
Hi
I was interested in what you had to say about PH Muntz, He was GF's younger brother and from what I understand he was contracted by GF to make yellow metal for him. However from reading some papers it seems after GF 1sts death he started to claim he had been a business partner and it went to chancery in 1865. Would you have any information on this? Thanks
 

DJKH

New Member
Hi
very interested to hear you are a descendant and was wondering which line you came from?
Thanks
 

JCK

New Member
G.F. Muntz built Ley now called Lea Hall, near Perry Bar, but it was his youngest son P.A. Muntz M.P., who built Dunsmore in 1881 and bred the world famous Dunsmore stud of shire horses. The house is on the market again, however the estate was sold by my grandfather who died circa 1922. He was the last family member to be managing Muntz Metals Ltd., Elliots then took over the company before selling the patents to I.C.I., who in turn made Muntz Plastics which were making goods up till 1970?. I think that the Gas Board bought the works at French Walls later. I can remember seeing the advertisement for Muntz Metal painted along the wall of the canal when travelling on the Pines Express train from Manchester to Bournemouth.
Hi Mr Molyneux,
Do you know anything about what happened to your Great Grandfather's House (Lea Hall) circa 1920 and how it came to be allotments? Many thanks!!
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
On reading this thread I notice that GF Muntz is labelled a great man. It always interests me as to why many are called great, some just because other people have said so.

Now if you consult Wikipedia concerning George Frederick Muntz (26 November 1794 – 30 July 1857). It says that he was an industrialist from Birmingham, England and a Liberal Party Member of Parliament (MP) for the Birmingham constituency from 1840 until his death.

Fair enough but further on...

...Whilst claiming to be a republican, his true character appeared to be that of an egotistical aristocrat. Edwards wrote in 1877 of a conversation about a speech he made : "They won't be able to print Muntz's speech verbatim." "Why not?" said I. "Why my dear fellow, no printing office in the world would have capital I's enough".

More investigation needed!
 
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Pedrocut

Master Barmy
Re: Some great men and women of Birmingham..

This is a family album portrait of Philip Henry Muntz, around 1860ish. He lived at Edstone Hall Wooten Wawen (his seat) but purchased Somerset House, Leamington Spa in 1864 and lived there until his death on Christmas Day, 1888. He represented Birmingham for seventeen consecutive years - 1868-85 and was twice Mayor. Educated privately, he then was sent to Shrewsbury School prior to Heidelberg. His father-in-law was at one time, Finance Minister for the Grand Duchy of Baden. I know little about him(Philip Henry) in essence, other than he was considered to a very fair man and judge (magistrate) and conscientious Liberal politician. I only wish that I had been old enough to question my grandmother about him. His elder brother, George of 'Muntz Metal' fame, remains the more prominent member of the family, owing in no small part to his radical views. I think I am correct in saying that during the royal visit to then Muntz works (Prince Albert) it was HENRY who acted as 'host' as George declined that honour. The 'yellow metal' carpet in place of a red one, set down for that occasion, is recorded somewhere in text, but I cannot remember the source.
I don’t think it would be right to say that George Fred Muntz MP declined the honour to act as host during the visit of Prince Albert. He had sent a letter of apology to the Lord Major saying that he had urgent business in London.
 
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Pedrocut

Master Barmy
George Fredrick Muntz could certainly be regarded as famous, but I am not sure that he can be described as great. There are many references in the Newspaper Archives that help to add further information to the Wikipedia article.

The Birmingham Political Union, of which Muntz was a founder member, was formed in 1829 by Thomas Attwood, and amongst other things called for extending and redistributing suffrage rights to the working class. In 1832 it is reported that 200,000 people attended a meeting of the Union to put pressure on the House of Lords to pass the 1832 Reform Act. However many of the working class members felt “betrayed and frustrated,” as the Act was nowhere near universal suffrage.

There were some that benefited as Birmingham was granted Parliamentary representation by the Reform Act of 1832. with two MPs representing it. Thomas Attwood and Joshua Scholefield both Liberals, were elected as Birmingham's first MP's. On the retirement of Attwood in 1840, Muntz offered himself as candidate and was returned, and he served until his death in 1857.

In 1848 there was a new reform movement, but Muntz was against the call for universal suffrage, saying that at the time it would endanger the attainment of household suffrage.

One young artisan, George Mantle, wrote in response to a speech by Muntz...

“....it rather proves that the capital and credit that you can at all times command enables you to enter the markets when they are dull and heavy, and to carry off (under such pressure) both the raw material and the Labour at (to you) very advantageous terms. This confession of yours, sir, simply proves you to be a shrewd capatalist, whose successful speculations have greatly increased your private fortune and local influence.”

On his death he certainly left his sons something to work on; his son, also a George Fredrick Muntz, died in 1898 and left effects of over £1,000,000.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
As indicated above the son of the GF Muntz mentioned, also GF Muntz, left an enormous amount of money. He left money for the Church and schools he had erected around 1877 at Umberslade, southwest of the village of Hockley Heath, Solihull.

The Baptist Church was designated Christ Church and it is said that... “It was built by George Frederick Muntz following his purchase of Umberslade Park. Muntz was a Baptist convert and placed the church between his house and the village to attract further converts to the Baptist cause.”

The Church is now redundant and under the care of The Historic Chapels Trust. It is now a Grade II* Listed Building.

I had passed by this amazing Church on a walk from Hockley Heath in March 2006.
https://www.ipernity.com/doc/2254674/album/980872


Three views of the Baptist Church can be seen here...

https://www.ipernity.com/doc/2254674/44820122//in/album/980872
https://www.ipernity.com/doc/2254674/44820136/in/album/980872
https://www.ipernity.com/doc/2254674/44820138/in/album/980872
 
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