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Muntz George Frederick (1794-1857)

Webster

New Member
I am looking for information on George Frederick Muntz (1794-1857)
With respect to Muntz Metal (60/40 brass)
Some sources say that he patented Muntz Metal. I have copies of his patents 6325,6347 and 11,410. These refer to Sheathing of ships,manufacture of bolts,manufacture of metal plates for sheathing ships. None refer to the patent for Muntz Metal.Can anybody tell me if Muntz Metal was ever patented?
Are there any statues,plaques, buildings in Birmingham which refer to Muntz?
Thanks.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Post 945 at https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=31888 states it was patented, as does wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntz_metal). 6347 is described (https://archaeologydataservice.ac.u...062-1/dissemination/pdf/cornwall2-89948_3.pdf) as his second patent, and so 6325 would presumably be his first. As i understand it muntz patented the use of a particular blend of metals for ships purposes. Presumably it could also be use dfor other purposes, but was not patented by him for those.
 

Webster

New Member
The 1832 Patents are
6325 Sheathing for Ships, 6347 Manufacture of Bolts and other Ship Fastenings. But nothing about the patent for the composition of the alloy.
Thanks for your help, but Wikipedia cannot always be trusted.
 

G.S.Molyneux

Brummie babby
G.F. Muntz M.P. for Birmingham was my gt.gt. grandfather. His metal was patented as well as the nails used. My grandmother told me that the metal was discovered by chance, because the foreman was drunk when mixing the metal and put in the wrong mix. When Prince Albert visited the copper works they rolled out a sheet of Muntz metal for him to walk on instead of the usual red carpet. I will post more when I have checked out some family papers.
 

Old Boy

master brummie
Are there any statues,plaques, buildings in Birmingham which refer to Muntz?
Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Hi,
None of the above which I know of but there is a Muntz Street in Small Heath which presumably refers to him.

Old Boy
 

G.S.Molyneux

Brummie babby
There was a medallion struck with this inscription on the reverse, " An Honest Man A Sincere Reformer A Faithful Friend. Represented Birmingham from 1840 until his death".
 

G.S.Molyneux

Brummie babby
There was a medallion struck with this inscription on the reverse, " An Honest Man A Sincere Reformer A Faithful Friend. Represented Birmingham from 1840 until his death". G.F. Muntz M.P. for Birmingham.jpgG.F.Muntz M.P. for Birmingham medallion.jpg
 

G.S.Molyneux

Brummie babby
G.F. Muntz built Ley now called Lea Hall, near Perry Bar, but it was his youngest son P.A. Muntz M.P., who built Dunsmore in 1881 and bred the world famous Dunsmore stud of shire horses. The house is on the market again, however the estate was sold by my grandfather who died circa 1922. He was the last family member to be managing Muntz Metals Ltd., Elliots then took over the company before selling the patents to I.C.I., who in turn made Muntz Plastics which were making goods up till 1970?. I think that the Gas Board bought the works at French Walls later. I can remember seeing the advertisement for Muntz Metal painted along the wall of the canal when travelling on the Pines Express train from Manchester to Bournemouth.
 

G.S.Molyneux

Brummie babby
@Webster, I will have to look that up in the family papers, which will have that info, that may take some time, but don't worry!.
 

fredstone

New Member
Re: Some great men of Birmingham.. Philip Henry Muntz M.P. circa 1860

My great-great grandfather, Philip Henry Muntz (later MP for Birmingham and twice its Mayor) was born at SELLY HALL in the Northfield district of Birmingham - now named St Pauls Convent. I am not sure whether any of the old hall remains as part of the convent. Philip Frederick Muntz, the paternal father of the Muntz family in England, resided at Selly Hall until his death in 1811, the same year as the infant Philip Henry was born. Philip Frederick's first factory, I believe stood in Water Street, Birmingham. From that acorn 'Muntz Metal' seemingly grew. A century later and I recall from an old worker/employee at the West Bromwich works (PH MUNTZ & BARWELL) during the 1920's that folk strived to get work there, owing to both fair wages and fair treatment. Philip Henry's elder brother, George Frederick, was probably the best known member of that family, owing to 'Muntz-Metal' and the plates which adorned the hull of the Cutty Sark and his political stance as a radical reformer. He is mentioned in the Ingoldsby Legends in respect of his huge black beard and being the first member of Parliament to wear a beard. A rather unorthodox man, George was seemingly greatly respected by his workforce, as was demonstrated on his death, when they lined the funeral route in great numbers. As a footnote, I always understood that Philip Frederick, the father, raised George in the 'physical' vein, i.e. developed him body and soul, so that as an adult, reports tend towards making mention of his sheer physical strength and size. Few men, if any, seemed keen to take him on! Colourful times!
 

Attachments

fredstone

New Member
Re: Some great men and women of Birmingham..

This is a family album portrait of Philip Henry Muntz, around 1860ish. He lived at Edstone Hall Wooten Wawen (his seat) but purchased Somerset House, Leamington Spa in 1864 and lived there until his death on Christmas Day, 1888. He represented Birmingham for seventeen consecutive years - 1868-85 and was twice Mayor. Educated privately, he then was sent to Shrewsbury School prior to Heidelberg. His father-in-law was at one time, Finance Minister for the Grand Duchy of Baden. I know little about him(Philip Henry) in essence, other than he was considered to a very fair man and judge (magistrate) and conscientious Liberal politician. I only wish that I had been old enough to question my grandmother about him. His elder brother, George of 'Muntz Metal' fame, remains the more prominent member of the family, owing in no small part to his radical views. I think I am correct in saying that during the royal visit to then Muntz works (Prince Albert) it was HENRY who acted as 'host' as George declined that honour. The 'yellow metal' carpet in place of a red one, set down for that occasion, is recorded somewhere in text, but I cannot remember the source.
 
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