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moseley rd remand centre

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
hi there guys
what i want to know as to why and when ;was mosely rd remand centre as it was in the fore gone years
on moseley rd next to the old church which is still being used and it was next to old harveys bakery
which was used for the bad kids whom committed crime and was sent there by thebirmingham juvenile courts
from all over the place not just birmingham courts was for being held for a period of timeawaiting courts decision on what to do with he bad kids it was also used as a detention centre to detain kids for a period of time
it later became and changed name as a commutity homefor young kids i beleive they called it atherstone house
but due to the staffing that was employed in the seventys allowed these kids to do what they wanted to do there ; drink and smoke druggs and come and go when they feel to do ; so thats why they closed it down ; and the building as been closedup for about twenty or thirty years now ; so why have they not done some think about it why not a placefor the homeless or an hostel; or some think of that nature; put it to used i say ;the part i would like to know when was this centre first openend up as a birmingham remand centre
for these young tearaways i beleive it was a little hardplace .i beleive it was for kids up to the age of 14 years old
surely why not openen it up again ;if only for the young home less night shelter; after all they demolished the old stratford rd church on camp hill for night shelter for the men folk
would be intresting tohear or see what the council intend to do with it and the views of of other members ;
have a good day folks and wrapp up warm ; and be careful out there ; astonian
 
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Elizabeth Redmond

Guest


1911 - 2001 (c.)

This home has had a number of different functions during its long history and a number of different names including 'the Birmingham Children's Remand Home', 'the Boys' Remand Home', 'the Junior Remand School', 'the Moseley Road Remand Home' and finally, 'Athelstan House'. The following text is our best effort at extrapolating this complex history from the written records available.

The home opened in 1911 as Birmingham Children's Remand Home having been paid for by Barrow and Geraldine Cadbury. At this stage, the home was run by a voluntary committee which worked closely with the City Council.

According to the registers from the early years of the remand home, many of the children brought into the home were not on remand but were destitute and were brought into the home for just for just a short while before being sent back to their parents, to an independent orphanage or into the workhouse. At this time, both boys and girls were being brought into the home.

In the 1930s, it was the only remand home in Birmingham and accommodated boys who were aged over 10, 15 in total. At this time, known as the Moseley Road Remand Home, the running of the home was taken over by the Education Committee of the Council. Another part of the same building was in use as a hostel for working boys.

During the Second World War, all the children were evacuated to Bell Heath Lane in 1940 (and then to Fircoft College in 1941). At the end of the war, the older boys went to Forhill while boys up to the age of 12 went back to the Moseley Road home which, at this time, was known as the Junior Remand Home.

In 1948, it accommodated 30 children – boys aged 8 to 12 and girls aged 8 to 14.

“The premises were built in a pleasant style reminiscent of many of the buildings in Bournville and are well adapted for their functions. Pleasant airy dormitories for four to six or seven boys each, a large neat, dining room, playrooms with lockers for the possessions of each individual boy, and good sanitary and kitchen accommodation were provided. A large hut was subsequently added to serve as a schoolroom in which a qualified teacher wrestles with the educational problems of a constantly changing population” [Children’s Committee 1953]

In 1966, Athelstan House was still a remand home and accommodated 30 boys aged under 13½. Older boys were sent to Forhill.

The Children’s Committee minutes of February 1966 state that Athelstan House needed to be replaced as the Moseley Road area was scheduled for industrial development and thus would not be suitable as a location for a remand home.

However, Althelstan did not close. The following year, a decision taken to make the centre, now known as, Athelstan House into a reception centre for both boys and girls – a 16 bed home for 13-16 year olds. The remand function of Athelstan being taken over by Forhill.


Athelstan was king of England from about 924 to about 940, there is a local connection as, before his reign as King of England, he was King of Mercia (the Midlands counties) as was his father before him.

Girls were only accommodated at Athelstan, for a short time however. In 1972 the home became a boys' only observation and assessment centre.

The view of a senior residential care officer at Athelstan House from 1974 to 1977:

“It had the function of being an assessment centre. Boys were remanded to us for three weeks or six weeks by the juvenile court and our job was basically to keep them contained and while they were there, assess them. So, we put them in various situations where we could assess their behaviour and attitudes and whatever else. There was a school on the site so it was totally contained, they didn’t leave unless they went out on some kind of special treat, which was usually a Sunday afternoon.Sometimes we took them out to the park in the evening, occasionally they would get a treat like a trip to the ice rink or something, but not very often. More often than not it was an enclosed thing, there were big fences at the back. I think they are still there probably”.

By 1981, the home was accommodating both boys and girls once more. In 1982, Athelstan House became the district centre for the central district. As such it provided reception and other facilities (including placement and management) for the 13 other community homes in the central district.

In 1988, it was planned that the residential side of the work at Athelstan House, as a district centre, would be moved to the recently closed Melplash building on Moseley Road. Remaining at Athelstan house would be the Fostering and Adoption Team, Child Abuse Team and Children’s Services. Residential care continued at Athelstan House, however, until it closed.

Athelstan House closed on 23rd May 2001.
 
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Old Boy

master brummie
Hi All,

Thankyou Elizabeth for your excellent account of the history of Athelstan House. Like Alan I feel that some use should be made of it now unless it has alrady deteriorated beyond repair.

Old Boy
 
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Elizabeth Redmond

Guest
Hi I lived a little way from here when I was growing up, and never knew this place existed, until a few years ago,
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
HI Elizabeth
Just felt i had to say a big thank you myself personaly like old boy said thank you for that in most valued information
regarding that building as i have been reading and watching with intrest on this property for years and as i am researching a person whom was
the school teacher whom was there trying to educate these kids many years ago and she lived in one of the victorian houses across th road from the home she her self was a victorian lady within her own can you cast your ideas as to what this building could become ;
and whilst you mentioned forhill house what become of that ; was that closed down do you know ; ? .
but its seems a shame as to the council leaving it emty fr all these years now ;
once again elisabeth i sincerely thank you for your responce in my thread ; bestwishes Astonian
 
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Elizabeth Redmond

Guest
Back to Results Forhill House, Lea End Road, Bromsgrove



1945 - 1987 (c.)

Barrow Cadbury, as a keen observer of remand work in the city, believed that the city needed a new type of remand home or observation centre where children could be observed for longer periods of time than was usual so that more comprehensive reports about them could be given to the courts. To this end, he gifted Birmingham a property called Leahyrst in Blackwell in 1942 in memory of his wife, Geraldine.

The idea was that the home would be used more as an opportunity to try to work out why the child’s behaviours had arisen rather than as a place of punishment.

Unfortunately, planning permission could not be obtained and so Leahyrst was sold in 1945. The money made from the sale was used to buy Forhill (pronounced 'forrull'), a large country house two miles south of Birmingham.

The city already had two remand homes for boys at this time – the Moseley Road Remand Home and Fircroft Remand Home, Bournville. During the Second World War, children had been evacuated from the Moseley Road Remand Home into temporary accommodation on Bell Heath and then into Fircroft College. While younger boys returned to the Moseley Road Remand Home, Forhill was intended for boys aged over 12 and thus, in 1945, all the Fircroft boys were moved into it.

Fircroft had already been developing the experimental observation approach favoured by Cadbury and so this continued at Forhill.

Forhill had accommodation for 50 boys aged 12 to 17.

The 1969 Children and Young Persons Act replaced children’s remand homes with observation and assessment centres, which would ‘provide facilities on both a residential and a day attendance basis for children remanded or subject to interim orders by the courts, and will advise on the treatment of children in care, so that decisions can be soundly based on the best possible diagnosis of the child’s needs and circumstances.’ [‘Children in Trouble’, Home Office, 1968.]

In 1981, the number of beds at Forhill was reduced from 50 down to 40.

In 1986, Brian Owen retired as principal of Forhill and was replaced by Percy Lea (previously principal of Tennal).

In 1987, Forhill House closed largely because of the amount of money needed to renovate the buildings. The remand function was moved to ‘Woodsong’ a new remand unit at St John’s, Erdington. The buildings of Forhill have since been demolished.

https://www.search.connectinghistor...&direction=1&pointer=766&text=1&resource=1663
 

Joey

New Member
HI Elizabeth
Just felt i had to say a big thank you myself personaly like old boy said thank you for that in most valued information
regarding that building as i have been reading and watching with intrest on this property for years and as i am researching a person whom was
the school teacher whom was there trying to educate these kids many years ago and she lived in one of the victorian houses across th road from the home she her self was a victorian lady within her own can you cast your ideas as to what this building could become ;
and whilst you mentioned forhill house what become of that ; was that closed down do you know ; ? .
but its seems a shame as to the council leaving it emty fr all these years now ;
once again elisabeth i sincerely thank you for your responce in my thread ; bestwishes Astonian
The teacher name when I was there was Miss crump
 

Joey

New Member
The teachers name when I was in there was miss crump.a fine lady ,she learnt me to read ,joe
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi joey
I am just wondering what year you may have been there was it pre forty or fifty or even early
As I can tell you the school mistress was a small very stout lady whom was a very Victorian style dressed lady and very stern in speech
And she lived across the road in the huge Victorian houses that use to be across the road from the centre
There was the council run school facing and the houses in Victoria style was on the left hand of the school
It had three or four steps high to get into the front door and her name was miss Steele and if you disobeyed or your writing was bad she would said you across to the main building a put soap in your mouth always had a bunch of keys on her waist and you would also get the stick
She was not a nice lady indeed in any form or state and in general in the early years of forty and fifths young lads would be sent there
For social reports for the courts and on arrival they would get a slap around and basicicaly to let you know whom is in control there and you would be told to say yes sir this was apparently done on reception when as soon as you went in to change into there uniforms of karky shirts and shorts
The remand centre uniform along with brown sandals and when scrubbing floors a men
Ber of staff would walk over it and say it was not good enough do it again
Violent to kids was going on strife way back in time there was no sexual contact just pur physical assaults
It was the norm in those days of the era then in the sixties and early seventies it changed to what they called a community home
With a complete different approach in staffing attitude what we call students carreys when they let kids run a mock in and out and smoke pot
It came to light and closed down for good and ever since it remained closed
Best wishes astonian,,,,,,,,,
 
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