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Midland Cycling & Athletic Club

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Pedrocut, thanks very much for these. Regarding the Goyt Valley piece, if you read the right-hand margin of the post you will see that it was I who contributed the scans to the website owner. Having become fascinated with the Goyt Valley and what had once been (before the creation of the reservoir) a most lovely cycling haunt, I stumbled upon David Stirling's Goyt Valley website and contacted him.

As to "Wheeling Adventure," it is one of three booklets (not really full books), sponsored by Birmingham's Phillips cycle manufacturer, "Renown the World Over." At one time Phillips sold more bicycles and bicycle parts globally than Raleigh. Each booklet contains an essay as much on the glories of cycling and on F.J. Urry's past cycling experiences as it does on selecting and caring for a bicycle. They are wonderful pieces, written in Urry's lovely style, and were handed out by cycle dealers as "soft sell" pieces. The complete list of titles is "Perfection in Cycling," (1949, the first and most rare), "Wheeling Adventure," (1951), and "Salute to Cycling," (1956), the last, issued just before Urry's death. One of my copies of "Salute to Cycling" had been handed out by the famous CTC-ite and cycle dealer/builder from Hull, Cliff Pratt.
In his description of the Goyt Valley Frank Urry mentions climbing to Axe Edge, heading towards Dane Head, and passing the Cat and Fiddle. The illustration shows a single track which from what is today Errwood Reservoir, up to Derbyshire Bridge.

Back in October 1990 with my late friend we had a 10 mile walk from Derbyshire Bridge, across Axe Edge Moor to Dane Head and on to Three Shire Heads. From there we headed to the Cat and Fiddle, on to Errwood Reservoir and back up the Goyt Valley. The last picture I took was from more or less the same spot as the artist’s drawing!

The series of scans can be seen here...
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/2254674/album/1018698
 

Wrongway Pete

New Member
In his description of the Goyt Valley Frank Urry mentions climbing to Axe Edge, heading towards Dane Head, and passing the Cat and Fiddle. The illustration shows a single track which from what is today Errwood Reservoir, up to Derbyshire Bridge.

Back in October 1990 with my late friend we had a 10 mile walk from Derbyshire Bridge, across Axe Edge Moor to Dane Head and on to Three Shire Heads. From there we headed to the Cat and Fiddle, on to Errwood Reservoir and back up the Goyt Valley. The last picture I took was from more or less the same spot as the artist’s drawing!

The series of scans can be seen here...
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/2254674/album/1018698
Pedrocut, amazing photos of a magical landscape. Thanks so much. I'd previously seen images from another rambler of some of the area and Errwood Hall, but yours are simply stunning! Makes me want to move to Britain.
 

Bish Bong

Midlander
THE MAKERS TOUR
The Centenary Pilgrimage which Frank Urry organised for the manufacturers of bicycles and equipment, was a great event, and probably one of the most enjoyable week-ends in a cycling sense the trade has ever spent. In all there were twenty eight manufacturers, and the total party was thirty two including journalists and photographers. The jolly old tourists did not enjoy the best of weather conditions, for when they reached the ridge of the Berwyns under Cader Fronwen, a 60 mile an hour gale, charged with the icicles of the north, tried to tear their coats off; while all day on the Sunday it rained with a steady persistence which could not damp the ardour and boyish jollity of that somewhat aged company. For the average age of those pedallers numbered 47, and many of them have passed the half century mark. But we have never seen, and probably never may we see again so magnificent an array of new bicycles and new waterproof equipment; the sight of it was enough to make the various villagers who stood and stared at us sufficiently covetous to break the beneficence of a weather-sad Sabbath.
The little week-end culminated in the formation of the Centenary Club, which is to be a most select company, exclusive to the executives of the cycle trade who have been on this week-end or other week-ends that the Club intends to organise. It is satisfactory to note , from a Roll-Call point of view, that of the company out, eleven of them were members of the Midland Cycling & Athletic Club.

This little article was printed in the MC&AC Roll-Call magazine in May 1939 & also included a photo of Frank Urry, plus a Group photograph of those that attended this inaugural event.
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
I was a proud member of the Midland C&AC I joined I think around 1946 (Huh John Bishop) and now living in Parker, Colorado USA I fully remember many such rides in like weather, but we always just caped up and carried on. Racing in those conditions was a challenge but we did it as in the photo of John Bradbury the late and a long time member of the club. A good mate and friend001-SNOW.gif
 

Aurry

New Member
Hi,

I just wanted to say I found this forum on a google search researching my family and it’s just been brilliant thank you! Frank Urry (Francis was his first name but known as Frank) was my great grandfathers brother and John Urry ( first name Albion) was my great great grandfather ) my father David was more into motorbikes however my son who is 14 is bike mad road bikes mountain bikes and bmx he has spent the whole of lockdown cycling and living his best life! How fantastic to find out that we had brilliant cyclists in the family
Thank you

THE MAKERS TOUR
The Centenary Pilgrimage which Frank Urry organised for the manufacturers of bicycles and equipment, was a great event, and probably one of the most enjoyable week-ends in a cycling sense the trade has ever spent. In all there were twenty eight manufacturers, and the total party was thirty two including journalists and photographers. The jolly old tourists did not enjoy the best of weather conditions, for when they reached the ridge of the Berwyns under Cader Fronwen, a 60 mile an hour gale, charged with the icicles of the north, tried to tear their coats off; while all day on the Sunday it rained with a steady persistence which could not damp the ardour and boyish jollity of that somewhat aged company. For the average age of those pedallers numbered 47, and many of them have passed the half century mark. But we have never seen, and probably never may we see again so magnificent an array of new bicycles and new waterproof equipment; the sight of it was enough to make the various villagers who stood and stared at us sufficiently covetous to break the beneficence of a weather-sad Sabbath.
The little week-end culminated in the formation of the Centenary Club, which is to be a most select company, exclusive to the executives of the cycle trade who have been on this week-end or other week-ends that the Club intends to organise. It is satisfactory to note , from a Roll-Call point of view, that of the company out, eleven of them were members of the Midland Cycling & Athletic Club.

This little article was printed in the MC&AC Roll-Call magazine in May 1939 & also included a photo of Frank Urry, plus a Group photograph of those that attended this inaugural event.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
I want to say thank you to everyone contributing to this thread! I'm not sure what planet I have been on but completely missed it until now.
oldbrit is my cycling mentor & Pedro please keep posting those wonderful photos for me its a history lesson and understanding the magnificent beauty.
Thank you all......
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
Hi,

I just wanted to say I found this forum on a google search researching my family and it’s just been brilliant thank you! Frank Urry (Francis was his first name but known as Frank) was my great grandfathers brother and John Urry ( first name Albion) was my great great grandfather ) my father David was more into motorbikes however my son who is 14 is bike mad road bikes mountain bikes and bmx he has spent the whole of lockdown cycling and living his best life! How fantastic to find out that we had brilliant cyclists in the family
Thank you
Where do you live? Maybe you could contact the Midland C&AC direct,Message BisBong John Bishop he is a big cheese in the club, they are still an active club, I am sure they would love to hear from you I know John has lots of older club news that include the URRY members
 

Aurry

New Member
Where do you live? Maybe you could contact the Midland C&AC direct,Message BisBong John Bishop he is a big cheese in the club, they are still an active club, I am sure they would love to hear from you I know John has lots of older club news that include the URRY members
thank you I will do I live in Devon UK My father his mother and her father ( Johns son and Frank’s brother) moved to Porlock in West Somerset in the 1960s
 

Bish Bong

Midlander
thank you I will do I live in Devon UK My father his mother and her father ( Johns son and Frank’s brother) moved to Porlock in West Somerset in the 1960s
Hi, I am John Bishop, General Secretary of the MC&AC.
I do indeed have all the historical records of the club. If I can be of any help please let me know.
Just remembered, I did some carpentry work for a member of the Urry clan many years ago, in a cottage at Dickens Heath, Solihull area.
 

Aurry

New Member
Hi, I am John Bishop, General Secretary of the MC&AC.
I do indeed have all the historical records of the club. If I can be of any help please let me know.
Just remembered, I did some carpentry work for a member of the Urry clan many years ago, in a cottage at Dickens Heath, Solihull area.
That was probably Sidney Urry or Wavell Urry my fathers uncle and cousin they all lived in Solihill/ Shirley areas
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
Amazing the contact that can be made through this BHF. It has completely changed my life. As we used to say "REAL CHUFFED" to say the least THANKS BHF
 

devonjim

master brummie
Many years ago I knew a WW1 veteran who lived in Lozells. He would speak fondly of his time out riding with his local cycling club, the Anglesey Wheelers. Anyone have knowledge of this organisation?
 
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