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MICRO BREW

H

hmld

Guest
:?
A general query:
This question has broader social-economic ramifications:
Many moons ago - decades - small breweries and individual taverns supplied their own brew. In modern times Brains of Cardiff would be an example, where local demand was sufficient to keep a brisk and prosperous operation operating around the clock. Actually the product did not travel well further afield, so I don't know if it made Swansea.
Davenports in Birmingham was another such operation. That company also owned pubs. (The founder [would you believe] was made a baron! - such must be the secular bourgeois equivalent of canonization.)
What interest me is that in recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the small scale, specifically microbrewing, on premises producion. And so I (would have) thought Birmingham would be a prime situation for such to be vogue, quite the thing, especially on account of enterprise heritage. I do not refer to a tavern which carries a range of stuff from smaller breweries peppered about the island.

This kind of individuated and small scale enterprise is surely a key component to the quality of community homelife, weft 'n' weave? So, in a certain strict sense, inspirational - while not advocating venality.
In the now defunct - because of prohibitive operating costs born by Peter Gamble - Virtual-Brum Forum a correspondent explained there is some fort of excise taxation regulation (probably introduced to favour the development of oligopoly by the big brewers as culminated with sweeping vigour in the 1950s) which is a prohibitive impediment to say an individual tavern or small co-operative operating. Though I am not satisfied that is altogether so.

So I'm wondering that since so many taverns were disgorged by the breweries and are now free houses - or appear to be from the slew of snaps on V-B - what is the extent of microbrewing?

Of course people make their own jobs at home. Many are likely skilled hobbyists. Some are undoubtedly professional drunks who embark on a pub outing vibrantly three sheets to the wind and soon reduced to a condition of abject simpering idiocy. A tragic plight and gruesome spectacle. That terribly unfortunate phenomenon eventuated with high unemployment and an increasingly ageing populace as elderfolk retirees on subsistence survival income. (There is a very incidence of men injured falling in and out of their trousers, including so doing falling down and upstairs. The statistics are shocking and clearly not attributable to a high incidence to rheumatism, arthritis, battle injury - as such was pandemic until recent time.)

Is there a trend, or a movement in the direction of independent brew pubs? There is a brewing component either at UoB or UoA - I think the former. So there is no shortage of brewers in receipt of formal disciplined training. The CAMRA operation aught prove an appropriate umbrella as catalyst for a process which would sweep the island.
British domestic beer consumption is very high per capita and has not contracted despite terribly adverse and utterly unnecessary economic conditions.

:wink:
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
hmld said:
:?
British domestic beer consumption is very high per capita and has not contracted despite terribly adverse and utterly unnecessary economic conditions.

:wink:

Problem is, hmld, the British are not now drinking British ale. The in vogue is for anything with the octane level of rocket fuel, brewed on the continent.

It seems to be even more desirable, if it tastes like cat's urine! :?
 
H

hmld

Guest
:?
Good gracious! A staunchly sobering observation! I was going by a Times Business summary - of course conveniently ignoring the fact you point out. Thanks. I notice M&B is moving a big grab on north England brewing operations. Just a superficial scan on my part, mind. It might be the prevalence of those mammoth drinking clubs is the illuminating prospect.
My recollection is that some of the real ales I've sampled from England were of exemplary character. But if the general taste is for hugely high octane composition with the flavour of cat urine.... I feel sorry for the cats, actually. The canned food they are being fed, as dogs, has recently been exposed as for the most part diabolical.
In the V-B Forum Rod Birch posted his recipe for dog biscuits which to any sensible human being were mouth watering.
But then for we radical traditionalists our lot seems naught other than stand our ground and stick with the real thing....
:wink:
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
Hit it on the head, hmld!

Today's commercial pet food is about as palatable as the beer (could actually explain the taste of the beer). Perhaps if their cats were fed better, our continental brothers could produce better ale? :lol:

God help us if they ever start feeding them on Mc******'s. :shock:
 
H

hmld

Guest
:idea:
An address for two learned articles (many citations) on toxicity of pet food (industry):

newsagepress.com/foodpetsdiefor.html.author
and
newsagepress.com

Ref.:
ANN MARTIN
Protect Your Pet
[ii]Foods Pets Die For[/i]

The article(s) are too long to post here, though if you email me I'll forward 'em:
[email protected]

The high octane - often carbonated - business is very disadvantageous in the longer term because it rapidly induces a knee jerk reaction of hypoglycaemia - and of course hypo and hyper manic behaviour.
The internal organization being an utter addle.

Best
:wink:
 
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