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Loxton School and Bloomsbury St

A

angeleyes

Guest
teachers

welcome back kandor i remember those teachers i went to that school also mrs hastelow i lived opp co/op dairy mary
 
A

angeleyes

Guest
windsor st

hi everyone does anyone have any info on this school or pictures i attended this school in 1954 my teacher was miss soppitt i think and i recall a miss janice te janitor also a mr fairbourne thank you mary god bless
 

Pomgolian

Kiwi Brummie Admin' Team
:angel: Try these:
BLOOMSBURY ST area
The school playground (Outside 'Miss Piggies' classroom).
The school from Goodrick St gate
The Nick
The Library
 
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proper brummie

proper brummie kid
loxton st boys ,bloomsbury st.school.

Thanks for the photos,the picture of the police station,brought back many
memories,the house shown next door to the station,was the last house in the
yard where we lived,See my contribution on neighbours and streets!
Thanks again.
 

Isobel

proper brummie kid
Re: windsor st

hi everyone does anyone have any info on this school or pictures i attended this school in 1954 my teacher was miss soppitt i think and i recall a miss janice te janitor also a mr fairbourne thank you mary god bless
Hi Angel , I attended Windsor St from 1950 to 1956 . I think I remember the teachers mentioned . Do you remember Miss Holton and Mr Taylor.I played in the skittle ball team and have a picture somewhere.
 

pedlarman

master brummie
Re: Loxton St School

I went to Loxton st School back about 1938 when I was 8yrs old and living in Vauxhall. We left there when I was 11yrs old and went to live in a new house in Kingstanding. I remember I had to walk up Duddeston Mill Rd over the railway bridge down to, I think it was Gt Lister St, I know there were trams running along there and I had to cross over it to get to Loxton St.
Kandor, you say it was a boys school, but I saw a message on VirtualBrum I think it was. It was from a lady named Terry and she went there in 1957. I replied to her message and she said she was glad to hear from someone who even remembered the place. Yes indeed I do and have fond memories of school friends, and the Gas Works where we would go to get Coke for the fire in the winter months, and the continual smell of Gas in the air..

Happy Days. Wally.



Hi, Wally,

I know you wrote your post in 1994 and I hope you are still a member.

I just wanted to say that in all the "Old Schoolmates" websites I have looked at over the last seven or eight years I have only ever come across one other Loxtonian who was at Loxton Street Senior Boys at the same time that I was (a Brett Ford)

I have given up on my old classmates but, at least, I have found yet another Loxtonian who was there at about the same time as me...!

I joined the school just about the time WW2 started in 1939, when I was eleven and left at 14 in 1942.

Cheers,

Jim Pedley (pedlarman)
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BazzM

master brummie
Jim. I may be another one that wasnt there at the same time as you, I was there 1954-64, but I stillclass anyone that went to Loxton St.,as a MATE. Hope you find some class mates soon. Barry.
 

GER22VAN

master brummie
I was there from about 1949 to 1953, Teachers names were Mr Mears, Mr Walker.Mr Howell. Mr Bond, Mr Martin and a couple that I have forgoten. Also Mr Hartshaw ? and Mr Jones who were Head teachers there.
 
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Peter Walker

gone but not forgotten
I didn't go to Loxton Street as a kid, but my dad taught there, from 1933 until about 1956 (less 4 years in the RAF), and I remember many of the other teachers. Sam Hartshorne was the headmaster after Len Griffiths retired in about 1942. He was quiter a character, and used to write grown-up plays for the old BBC steam radio, as well as doing stuff for Children's Hour. He lived in Sutton, and I remember his hospitality very well.
Harold Martin, mainly the craft teacher, specialised in woodwork and metalwork, but he was a good fiddle player (not to mention the greenhouse he built to encourage the lads to develop their green fingers) , and trained as a teacher with my dad at Saltley College in the very early 30s. I was brought up to call him Uncle Birdie, and his kids called my dad Uncle Felix.
There are quite a few recollections of Loxton Street on other threads I believe - you should try the search engine. I have come in contact with quite a few people here who remember the school, my dad, and in one case even me.
Peter
 

pedlarman

master brummie
Bazzm: Thanks for the sentiment. In spite of your youth(!) please consider yourself a MATE of this other Loxtonian...

Cheers,

Jim
 

pedlarman

master brummie
GER22VAV: Hello again. I well remember popular "Daddy" Walker, the art teacher and talented pianist, whose renderings on the piano used to march us back to our classrooms after morning assembly.

I also remember Mr. Martin, who used to teach geometry and woodwork. He wasn't quite so popular. He lost his temper too easily, especially if you weren't very bright, and I recall a sharp clout across the head because I had made a wrong projection in a Geometry lesson...

I'm not sure about the other teachers you mention. One or two of them may have been at Lokko at the same time but - as I have just mentioned - I'm not very bright, and don't have any vivid recall of teachers I wasn't taught by.

My memory comes to life with names like George Grove ("Groggy") - another popular one... And can see some teachers' faces but not their names. Ah well! This aging business is a curse...!

Mind you, I did manage to finish as school captain and was the main runabout for "Dickie" Griffiths - who was headmaster at the time.

I have aleady mentioned in another post that Mr. Griffiths made out my school leaving certificate to "John" Pedley, instead of the correct christion name, James, because - at the time - there was a song came out called "Johnny Pedlar" and that's what he used to call me...

And that's why he slipped up and made out the certificate to "John".

Cheers,

Jim Pedley (pedlarman)
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wallyb71

master brummie
Hi! Jim, When I went to Loxton there was a silver haired lady who was Head Mistress of the school. She used to play the Mandolin and once a week she would have one of the classes sitting on the floor in that large assembly hall just to hear her play. I only remember that the classrooms were around the assembly hall and there was a balconey upstairs with classrooms around it to. I can't recall any of the teachers names.

Have a nice day, Wally.
 

GER22VAN

master brummie
Jim. I remember all those names apart from one - the games teacher. A teacher I missed was Mr Bond the religious teacher ( Very Strict like Mr Martin.) I can remember most of their faces. There should be a couple of photographs somewhere on one of the threads.
 

GER22VAN

master brummie
Wally. I guess you may be talking about the junior school.
The senior school was also as you described with D and C first year followed by B second and third year. downstairs fourth year B and A as I remember them.
 

Peter Walker

gone but not forgotten
It's a pity I left home almost 50 years ago now, after my mum died and my dad remarried. We had a lot of photos of Loxton Street and other things, which I never saw again, as I didn't get on very well with my stepmother, and had no souvenirs, other than from my grandmother, who outlived my dad by three years. Among the pictures was a very good one of Mr Bond - I think they called him Wally, but I'm not sure. I seem to remember he was a big man, built like policemen used to be, and didn't he have a west country accent?
I got on well with Jimmy Rome who taught at the school (except for a spell of military service in the war) and a few years after. He was a very lively character, and must have been a good teacher. I remember he took me up to Ellesmere Port for the day, and we came with his girl friend back to Brum for the Easter week end in 1947.
Peter
 

GER22VAN

master brummie
Peter. Mr Bond as you say was a big man and although I said he was strict I believe he was most probably a kind man, I quite think he could put any man in his place but not violent of coarse. There should be a photograph of him posted from a newspaper clip by the name of " Goodby Locko ." somewhere on a thread. He came from Cornwall as chaps used to laugh about him ( not to his face I dare say ) quoting " When I was down in Cornwall ". I could never forget it.
 

pedlarman

master brummie
Hi! Jim, When I went to Loxton there was a silver haired lady who was Head Mistress of the school. She used to play the Mandolin and once a week she would have one of the classes sitting on the floor in that large assembly hall just to hear her play. I only remember that the classrooms were around the assembly hall and there was a balconey upstairs with classrooms around it to. I can't recall any of the teachers names.

Have a nice day, Wally.


Hi, Wally,

Thanks for coming back to me. I guess you must have started Lokko at the Junior school, as we didn't have a female headm(aster!) when I was there.

But it's nice to know we have something in common - good old Loxton Street...!

Cheers,

Jim Pedley (pedlarman)
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pedlarman

master brummie
It's a pity I left home almost 50 years ago now, after my mum died and my dad remarried. We had a lot of photos of Loxton Street and other things, which I never saw again, as I didn't get on very well with my stepmother, and had no souvenirs, other than from my grandmother, who outlived my dad by three years. Among the pictures was a very good one of Mr Bond - I think they called him Wally, but I'm not sure. I seem to remember he was a big man, built like policemen used to be, and didn't he have a west country accent?
I got on well with Jimmy Rome who taught at the school (except for a spell of military service in the war) and a few years after. He was a very lively character, and must have been a good teacher. I remember he took me up to Ellesmere Port for the day, and we came with his girl friend back to Brum for the Easter week end in 1947.
Peter


Peter,

I have sent you a post in the past - rather a long one, which ruminated for quite a length on Loxton Street Senior Boys. But I had only just become a member of Heartlands and was fumbling a bit with posting methods, so I think my post was lost in the maelstrom...!

But in my post I certainly didn't forget to sing the praises of your popular father - who was affectionately nicknamed "Daddie" by us wartime urchins...

And I shall never forget his talents on the piano, when his music used to march us back to our classrooms after Assembly. I know he was a talented artist, too, and I remember - long after I left school - that I came across a report that he had produced a book of drawings of Fuschias, a flower he was crazy about...

I also remember that Mr. Grove (nickname "Groggie") also had a craze - Roses - and this craze used to help us get out of Maths lessons; one of us would stand up and ask Mr. Grove a question about roses. By the time "Groggie" had finished answering the question and enlarging on the subject there was no time left for Maths!

Incidentally, I notice that in one of your posts you bracketed a query after headmaster, Mr Griffiths' first name, which you had (mistakenly) noted as Les. I was captain of the school at that time and spent a little time doing errands for Mr. Griffiths. As a result I had seen that he always signed his documents as: Leo Griffiths - short for Leonard, I suppose. And I believe you did pick this up in a later post.

But I could go on and on. It's nice to know I am in contact with the son of one of my old teachers...

Regards,

Jim Pedley (pedlarman)
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