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Lost Birmingham Pubs

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
below is a thread for shadwell st with photos



 

pauljon

master brummie
I believe that the area was known as St. Mary's. Bath Street address was known as St. Mary's Birmingham 4.
Shadwell Street Little Shadwell Street and Shadwell Street were next to Bath Street. The district was Ladywood.
 

Tinpot

master brummie
Does anyone remember The Greyhound in Holloway Head.
It was a Cider House, I talking rough cider which you drank through your teeth.
It was a strong brew and they used to keep a Shillelagh behind the bar for those people who didn't know when to leave when they'd had enough !
Is it still there ?
It must be more than 50 years ago when I drank cider in the Greyhound. It was usually with black currant.
 

Tinpot

master brummie
Certainly made your head swim. A bit like these hearts drifting around today.

My earliest pub memory is the Brighton on Coventry Road. My Mum and Dad used to drink there and would take me round to the garden. We lived on Grange Road by the cinema.
 

patricia NASH

knowlegable brummie
my fave watering holes were the Golden Eagle - a rough bikers pub at top of new street - bulldozed down and became extension to post office. Also Bogarts on New Street and Costermongers near Brum market at back of tescos near oasis - well thats where they were if I remember correctly back to 1980s. I also remember when Tesco was the Beehive. Oh gosh I'm getting old:cry:
the eagle is where i first knew my husband my sister worked there as a barmaid this was in the sixties , the manager was the late ray scott and his wife betty ray passed away in 2002 betty passed away 6 mths ago
 

pauljon

master brummie
The pubs I remembered as a child was The Gunmakers Arms affectionately known as the Guns. which was opposite the yard where I lived, in Bath Street. Saturday nights we children used to sit on the step at the bottom of the yard and watch the fights outside, we were never frightened as the men never bothered with us or shouted at us. My mom used to be a cleaner there. The other pub was the Bull on the corner of Price Street and Loveday Street. In those days children were not allowed inside pubs and used to sit outside whilst their parents were drinking, if they were lucky they had a bottle of pop and a bag of crisps. Opposite the pub was waste ground which was known as the bombed peck. One bonfire night all of the regulars from the Gunmakers arms came out to join our bonfire (which was being supervised by my uncle) he had dug a trench around it to keep us all safe and he had fireworks
sealed in a tin. We were all given a potato to hold, to stop us getting burned when we held a sparkler. ( something I always did with my children and grandchildren.). We had great fun that night, the men from the pub, bought us all bottles of pop and bags of crisps and joined in with us. Potatoes were put in the hot embers and the men were all laughing as they tried to retrieve them. The mums provide cocoa and toffee apples on sticks. The bonfire was so big that it was blazing away and the fire engine had to come and put it out. Such excitement. A night to remember.
 

MWS

master brummie
A little further afield in Cradley but my 3xgreat grandfather was a brewer and one time publican who seems to be associated with The Vine (long gone) in Park Row. Possibly his mother in law (my 4xg grandmother) was as well, there seems to be a newspaper article from 1834.

Question is were there no restrictions on what a pub could be called? I think I've found 3 pubs all called The Vine operating at the same time with barely a mile between them - Park Row, Colley Gate and Lyde Green.

Would seem quite easy to get confused especially if already a little worse for wear.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
No restrictions. Sometimes , if very close then one might have "new" added to the title. {it has been known for the original to disappear and later another appear, so the "New" XXX is actually older than the XXX
 
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Reactions: MWS

Zoe_T

Brummie babby
Hello all, I've a newspaper advert from 1855 for the Plough and Harrow Wild Green [sic]. Can anyone point me to where this pub was in Wylde Green / whether it is an existing building/pub with a different name. The ad describes the Plough and Harrow being on the main road from Birmingham to Sutton. Thank you.
 

NoddKD

master brummie
It ain't the wrapping,it's the content that matters. Why care what a pub is called it's the tasty ale inside that counts.:yum:yum:D;)

NoddKD. Not an alcoholic,yet:innocent:
 

MWS

master brummie
Hello all, I've a newspaper advert from 1855 for the Plough and Harrow Wild Green [sic]. Can anyone point me to where this pub was in Wylde Green / whether it is an existing building/pub with a different name. The ad describes the Plough and Harrow being on the main road from Birmingham to Sutton. Thank you.

The earliest map I can find of Wylde Green is 1889. The only pub seems to be the Wylde Green Hotel.

However on the 1861 census William King is listed as Publican on Sutton Road, Wylde Green (doesn't say Plough & Harrow) but there is a newspaper report of the death of his wife, Eliza in 1860 at the Plough & Harrow.

Willian Green is listed between The Oaklands and Wylde Green House on the 1861 census both of which are on this map...

Wylde Green.jpg

The Wylde Green Hotel is on the opposite side of the road to The Oaklands. If this is the renamed Plough & Harrow or a different pub I don't know.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
The 1868 Warwickshire Kellys lists William King as the landlord of the Plough & Harrow, so it looks like it is the same as the Wylde Green Hotel
 

Zoe_T

Brummie babby
The earliest map I can find of Wylde Green is 1889. The only pub seems to be the Wylde Green Hotel.

However on the 1861 census William King is listed as Publican on Sutton Road, Wylde Green (doesn't say Plough & Harrow) but there is a newspaper report of the death of his wife, Eliza in 1860 at the Plough & Harrow.

Willian Green is listed between The Oaklands and Wylde Green House on the 1861 census both of which are on this map...

View attachment 154361

The Wylde Green Hotel is on the opposite side of the road to The Oaklands. If this is the renamed Plough & Harrow or a different pub I don't know.
Thank you for your detective work!
 

Zoe_T

Brummie babby
The earliest map I can find of Wylde Green is 1889. The only pub seems to be the Wylde Green Hotel.

However on the 1861 census William King is listed as Publican on Sutton Road, Wylde Green (doesn't say Plough & Harrow) but there is a newspaper report of the death of his wife, Eliza in 1860 at the Plough & Harrow.

Willian Green is listed between The Oaklands and Wylde Green House on the 1861 census both of which are on this map...

View attachment 154361

The Wylde Green Hotel is on the opposite side of the road to The Oaklands. If this is the renamed Plough & Harrow or a different pub I don't know.
Thank you too - so great to be able to piece things together with your help.
 
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