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Lock keeper’s cottages

Here is a Tame Valley Canal Lock Keepers cottage with a story attached ...

View attachment 150803
Re the above cottages, Enock Mason, shown in photo below, was the lock keeper on stretch of lock 10 -13, by College Road Bridge. He also worked the pumping station in Deakin Avenue, Witton. The next door neighbour, who also worked for BW, as a builder, was Mr. Mrs Lindop.
The right hand side of the building was used for shoeing the cart horses. To the side was a very large stable which held overnight cart horses from the boats.
Just up from these cottages on the canal bridge, was the boat entrance to the coal wharf. Which can still be seen, although it’s built across.
These cottages were sold off in 1966, to build the small industrial estate, which is still there.
My grandfather and his wife, plus the next door neighbours, were moved to two new Dormer bungalows, built by BW at the side of the canal on the Walsall Road, lock 13. By this time both were retired age 72, but they had these properties rent free until their deaths. These properties were then sold about 1968, to Private buyers.
There ends the life story of Enock Mason, who gave 50 years of his life to working on the canal, plus polishing all the brass works in the pumping station in Deakin Avenue AC9845CF-45CA-4E46-8A82-878774DB9843.jpegand keeping it in running order. He loved it.

Such fond memories of this cottage, where I lived as well , when I was small.
Every night to get to sleep, I walk the cottage remembering the rooms, the very large garden, and the outhouses, where gran used her ‘dolly maid’ to bash the washing, then put it through the ringer.
THE END, but not forgotten.
 

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Richarddye

master brummie
Re the above cottages, Enock Mason, shown in photo below, was the lock keeper on stretch of lock 10 -13, by College Road Bridge. He also worked the pumping station in Deakin Avenue, Witton. The next door neighbour, who also worked for BW, as a builder, was Mr. Mrs Lindop.
The right hand side of the building was used for shoeing the cart horses. To the side was a very large stable which held overnight cart horses from the boats.
Just up from these cottages on the canal bridge, was the boat entrance to the coal wharf. Which can still be seen, although it’s built across.
These cottages were sold off in 1966, to build the small industrial estate, which is still there.
My grandfather and his wife, plus the next door neighbours, were moved to two new Dormer bungalows, built by BW at the side of the canal on the Walsall Road, lock 13. By this time both were retired age 72, but they had these properties rent free until their deaths. These properties were then sold about 1968, to Private buyers.
There ends the life story of Enock Mason, who gave 50 years of his life to working on the canal, plus polishing all the brass works in the pumping station and keeping it in running order. He loved it.

Such fond memories of this cottage, where I lived as well , when I was small.
Every night to get to sleep, I walk the cottage remembering the rooms, the very large garden, and the outhouses, where gran used her ‘dolly maid’ to bash the washing, then put it through the ringer.
THE END.
Wonderful story!
Thanks for sharing
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Andy Tidy makes remarkably interesting videos about the lost canals of Birmingham and Birmingham Canal history. In his latest he covers the Perry Barr canal down to Spaghetti Junction and mentions Enock Mason, the lockkeeper at College Road.

I did an interview with Andy in between the lockdowns last year about our waterworks. He is a sterling chap who has an amazing knowledge of the Birmingham canal systems. Please do enjoy his video.

 

Richarddye

master brummie
Andy Tidy makes remarkably interesting videos about the lost canals of Birmingham and Birmingham Canal history. In his latest he covers the Perry Barr canal down to Spaghetti Junction and mentions Enock Mason, the lockkeeper at College Road.

I did an interview with Andy in between the lockdowns last year about our waterworks. He is a sterling chap who has an amazing knowledge of the Birmingham canal systems. Please do enjoy his video.

Mort, REALLY enjoyed that video, thank you!.......................Looking forward to the next edition!
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Me too. Learnt quite a few things from it. Didn’t realise the canals were/are still effectively a drain for water and that the 1960’s layout of the pillars under Spag Junction was designed with horse-pulled barges in mind. Seems so outdated (even for the 1960s) compared to the cars speeding overhead. But how appropriate to acknowledge that canal traffic with horses still existed at the time. Viv.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Well interestingly, when I was a kid, there were always hundreds of coal barges lined up outside the GEC. They generated their own electric right up until the 70’s maybe even later. I used to watch the coal being lifted up and taken into the boiler-room by the crane in the video.

It is worth watching more of Andy’s videos. He is a very good historian who places things into context.

Of course, if you’re really unlucky, you may come across me on one of them.
 

Woz24

New Member
Re; my post #37 & the Primrose Hill lock, I thought this one still existed, but had been extensively modernised. First it is properly called Garrison Lock No. 63 and here is the area on the 1902 Alan Godfrey map of Saltley:-
View attachment 150829
The lock keeper's house is pointed to by the red arrow.
The modern satellite view of the same area looks like this:-
View attachment 150830
with the Network Park Industrial Estate replacing the Gas Works. Here are two Google view of lock keeper's house from the canal side:-
View attachment 150831
and the next from Crawford Street where it is known as 70 Crawford Street:-
View attachment 150832
It's now a freehold 3-bedroom property, though one bedroom is only 8ft x 7 ft, was last sold in 2004 for £139,000, and offered for sale in 2018, but not sold, for £135,000. The Zoopla site has all the details here:-
https://www.zoopla.co.uk/property/70-crawford-street/saltley/birmingham/b8-1jl/347466
and if you move to Image History further down the page there are images both inside and outside.

But now come conflicting pictures and stories that it had burnt down sometime after 2012 when this picture was taken:- https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3143106 but seems that it was not demolished and the awning over the external staircase and some of the windows had been removed/modified. There are marks in the rendering on the Crawford Street view that suggest that windows may have been removed. Also in a picture take 43 years ago, the embankment between the lock and the pool behind it did not exist, but on the 1902 bank above it doed. What do you think?

Maurice :cool:
I lived in the back to back houses facing this little house in the early 60's..
 

Heartland

master brummie
Old Mohawk posted on December 7th an ariel view of Aston Locks. There was no lock keepers cottage in that view although there was a BCN cottage on the Coal Wharf, Chester Street for the wharfinger.

In Birmingham at Gas Street there are a collection of cottages beside the canal.630731.png

This is an ariel view of 1951 which shows Gas Street from Broad Street running from left to right. The Birmingham Canal passes under Broad Street and the decorative block of properties, and then Gas Street is fronted then by a warehouse, canal cottages and a length of wall where a basin extended under the road. This basin, with narrow boat, served a masons yard, but originally s built was called Islington Basin. The first purpose of Islington Basin was to serve to Birmingham Timber co wharf.

The long Worcester Bar is evident on the canal and the Bar Lock of 1815 is also seen. There is the BCN lock cottage, the Worcester & Birmingham Canal cottage, the Worcester & Birmingham company offices and another Worcester & Birmingham Canal cottage.

Under the Worcester & Birmingham Canal offices was another canal arm called Netherton Basin. This basin was built for the Netherton Coal Company which was actually a trading part of the Dudley Canal Company and so the Dudley Canal Co had a short length of canal in Birmingham City Centre.
 
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Heartland

master brummie
Yes the BCN Society have a facebook group looking at canal cottages, which generated some useful new information
 
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