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Kingsthorne Cranbourne Rd School

daimlerman

proper brummie kid
Hi Daimlerman.

If I remember correctly Mr Worrel, the Headmaster, was always in a smart grey suit. Definitely a figure of authority and, I guess very respected by parents. I think Mr Martin was his deputy, and rightly so as he could stop you in your tracks just with one of his stares ! Some of the punishments that went on in our childhood wouldn’t be tolerated today of course. I think we were lucky to get away with a rap over the knuckles - nowadays even that would be reported. And I remember the big step up to the next school. How frightening that seemed. Hardly any preparation for what to expect at ‘big school’. That’s all changed too. Kids have all sorts of activities to prepare them for the transition today. Kingsthorne was a walk in the park by comparison !

I think you must have been in different year to me. I can’t remember the names of your friends, but how lovely that you are still in touch.

Please keep the memories coming on here. It’s surprising how the seemingly smallest comment can bring back memories for others.

Viv.
Morning Viv,
I left Kingsthorne in the summer of '65.
Where did you live? I lived 4 doors from the school along Cranbourne road, opposite the Haskins; a large family of 10 kids. They all went to our school ranging from about 1955 to 1970! You probably encountered them.
My older sister, Christina Egan, was in the same class as Stevie Winwood, the famous musician.
Perhaps our paths crossed unknowingly.
I remember the car in your great pic. Mr Martin's black Triumph Mayflower which he later changed to a green Rover 90, probably not to be out done by Mr Worral's fleet of Daimlers.

We talk of discipline at that school, and I agree in the main, we got off lightly in most cases. However, I do recall one episode (*)
You might recall the Tuesday lectures (*) assembly. (*) we all remained in the hall to hear (*) about the virtues and morals of the bible and such like. However, one Morning we all sat down on the floor and (*) there were (*) two chairs on the stage and (*) the stage lighting was adjusted to a dim red glow.
(*) the names of two boys (*) were called (*). They were older boys. (*) They were sat (*) down and very cleverly began to cross examine them about an incident where they were seen after school, smashing bottles at the Co-oP Milk depot on Kingstanding Road.

This went on and on, and like a crown court Barrister, (*) ran their denials around in circles, gradually tripping them over. Occasionally (*) turned to the public gallery (us) and explained various points.
By now, the two boys were trembling with fear (*) Total silence descended and the teachers led us all back to the classrooms.

I too suffered the cane from(*) , but in the office one lunchtime. Me and Tommy Perkins, (of the Perkins brothers) had been amongst a gang of lads (*) involved in an incident in the playground Well we thought it was funny but the playground duty teacher, Mr Davis didnt and we were marched up to (*) the office. We were punished with one stroke of the cane on each hand. It didnt do us any harm but it did reaffirm the line which shouldn't be crossed.
So many memories Viv. That little greenhouse next to Mr Martin's car housed Cactus plants. When I moved up into Mr Martins class , One of my occasional responsibilities was to see they were watered. Another was to record the tempetatures from the thermometers in the Stevenson screen, placed in the central grass area...That spawned an interest which remains to this day. I now belong to an amature meteorologist group studying weather patterns around the world and trying to develop seasonal forecasts.
The school trips to Dudley zoo, Harvington hall, Warwick castle, etc were always great days out. They sparked another life long interest. I was more interested in the coach or bus than the subject matter of the trip.
When I left school, I started an apprenticeship with Birmingham corporation as an apprentice fitter on the blue and cream buses. Many, many years later, I joined the Police, then after retiring from police service, joined the Civil Service as a Driving Examiner finally retiring last year at 65 from a life of traffic and transport. It's still in my blood tho as I spend most of my days in my garage, restoring old cars.
Many more memories of Kingsthorne school to follow, not all bad I hasten to add.

(*) Edit. The above account has been edited to remove named teachers and accusations about their conduct. This is to protect any named person, whether rightly or wrongly accused, their family and friends, and the good name of BHF.
 
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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Yes great photo. The picture on the wall looks familiar. Think it might have been in the school in the 1950s when I went there. Viv.
 

Dom Tredwell

New Member
Thank Viv for taking the trouble to repost the history of Crambourne Road School you don't say when you attended the school.

I attend the school till 1948 before going to Dulwich Rd Seniors.

I've just been writing to a school friend in New Zealand it was nearly 70 years ago I met her,

Just in case any old school pall's are looking through these are some of the names I remember.

Graham Wharton, Kenneth Tredwell, Roy Parish ( played for Aston Boys Football Team ) Ronnie Jordan, Carol Crump, Margaret Ford, Maureen Faulkner, Derek Boxly, Johnnie Middleton,
The head Miss Fairhead, the dreaded Miss Freeman, Mr Howard,
I have to say they was happytimes it even though it was wartime for a part of my attendance, no buses in them days you walked in all snow, ice, fog.
Being Christmas I remember parents being asked to provide jellies and cakes for the party, with food rationing os cause it wasn't easy but we had our parties.
Hi my dad was Ken Tredwell, unfortunately he passed away last year. I recognise some of the names you have listed. Dad lived two doors away from the school at number 72. He was always late for school as he would lie in bed until he heard the school bell
 

Ray Griffiths

master brummie
Hi my dad was Ken Tredwell, unfortunately he passed away last year. I recognise some of the names you have listed. Dad lived two doors away from the school at number 72. He was always late for school as he would lie in bed until he heard the school bell
Hi Dom.
It’s great to hear from you Roy Parish used it live two house up from the school other end he was a good footballer played for the Aston Boys. Ronnie Jordan used to live just round the corner on Hurlingham Rd and Graham Wharton used to live on thr other side of the road up towards Kingstanding Rd. Them days we used to kick a block of wood round balls wasn’t allow, they was all great mates we never fell out we loved our football. Remember you Dad when we was leaving the seniors to start we had to go to meet a career specialist and you Dad wanted to be a lorry driver and they wanted him to consider a appentership like most of the others but he was having none of it what did he end up doing? They was great times we loved our football we used to be walked to playing fields just off Hawthorne Rd. I remember one Friday afternoon we should have gone but we was told the playing fields wasn’t playable the teacher had one hell of an afternoon with us. Some of his other mates and Dulwich Rd was Lennie Bacon and John Southern we used to meet in Perry Barr Park used use our kit to replace goal posts the football pitches wasn’t available. We all was bought up during the war years we had very little but we hads great times will never forget them. Ray Griffiths
 

Dom Tredwell

New Member
Hi Dom.
It’s great to hear from you Roy Parish used it live two house up from the school other end he was a good footballer played for the Aston Boys. Ronnie Jordan used to live just round the corner on Hurlingham Rd and Graham Wharton used to live on thr other side of the road up towards Kingstanding Rd. Them days we used to kick a block of wood round balls wasn’t allow, they was all great mates we never fell out we loved our football. Remember you Dad when we was leaving the seniors to start we had to go to meet a career specialist and you Dad wanted to be a lorry driver and they wanted him to consider a appentership like most of the others but he was having none of it what did he end up doing? They was great times we loved our football we used to be walked to playing fields just off Hawthorne Rd. I remember one Friday afternoon we should have gone but we was told the playing fields wasn’t playable the teacher had one hell of an afternoon with us. Some of his other mates and Dulwich Rd was Lennie Bacon and John Southern we used to meet in Perry Barr Park used use our kit to replace goal posts the football pitches wasn’t available. We all was bought up during the war years we had very little but we hads great times will never forget them. Ray Griffiths
Dad did various jobs until he did his national service, ended up in Northern Ireland in the army. The only time he left the British mainland, claimed it was abroad because you had to go on a ferry. Eventually he became a toolmaker and worked until he was 65. Dom
 

daimlerman

proper brummie kid
Dad did various jobs until he did his national service, ended up in Northern Ireland in the army. The only time he left the British mainland, claimed it was abroad because you had to go on a ferry. Eventually he became a toolmaker and worked until he was 65. Dom
Hi Dominic
I vaguely remember you as a tiny tot, and your brother Kendrick. We lived next door at 74.
Your dad would be in the outside loo singing rock n roll songs. I
I remember one day the back yard drains were blocked flooding the yards. Your dad and my dad pumping mops up and down in the drains trying to clear them. Eventually the council men had to come out and dig. They found a great big toad stuck in the pipe.
I remember your nan very well. Katie, I think my mom knew her as. The rest of us knew her as Mrs Treadwell. I can just about remember your grandad. He would cock his leg over the privet hedge and pretend he was coming to get me. I would run off giggling.
I remember your mom coming to meet up with your dad and being in the back garden together. Us kids would hide behind the privet hedge, sniggering and giggling.
Happy memories of Cranbourne Road.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Been having a sort out and found a few more of my photos for this thread. They would have been taken in the early 1960s.

In the background are the ‘huts’. Some classes were held in these huts but only on occasion during my time at the school. They were on the Tansley Road side and have now been demolished.
DE40836B-D154-43D8-8B67-BB940FAD54A1.jpeg


I think this was the air raid shelter in the background. The house just above the wall would have been on Cranbourne Road - May even have been the Caretaker’s house. To the left would have been the toilets - all outside toilets in my time in the late 1950s/60s.7888487B-A94B-4149-8D26-CFDD7A58120D.jpeg

Messing around in the playground on the Tansley Road side. All the boys were in my class - Mr Martin year 6 (aged 10/11)
7990F236-B472-42CF-8B54-A0821D9F5A70.jpeg

The following are photos from the wedding of the Caretaker’s son. He married my mums friend’s daughter and I was a bridesmaid. The wedding reception was held at the school - well why not if you’re the Caretaker !

.CC01CE2A-29E8-4AC3-95DF-0C8F6C675A06.jpeg
This was taken in the quadrangle. We often had lessons on the grass here in summer. Good memories of that time. The lady to the left was the Caretaker’s wife. The houses in the distance were on Tansley Road.

2CBFBFE2-50A0-4ED6-B97F-DC95DBB46700.jpeg

A view across the quadrangle - a centre path ran across it, sperating two lawned areas. The white weather station box would have been to the right.

72932F11-9028-49B9-A215-1289FA4CB38C.jpeg

There was a second storey to the school but only in certain parts. This was where the Headteacher’s (Junior one side, Infants the other) had their offices. I assume the staff rooms were up there too. An area off-limits to pupils.

Viv.
 
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Bobx

proper brummie kid
Ha ha ha....
I've just read the previous threads and found the photos fascinating. I was there with Jeff Egan and we had a fight in the toilets, and we've been mates since.
Great to have been there, great memories.72 Tansley Road 1960s (3).jpgMe & Peter Ricketts C1962.jpg
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Great photos Bob. That stage looks familiar, although much, much smaller than I remember. Thanks for posting. Viv.
 

daimlerman

proper brummie kid
Ha ha ha....
I've just read the previous threads and found the photos fascinating. I was there with Jeff Egan and we had a fight in the toilets, and we've been mates since.
Great to have been there, great memories.View attachment 154963View attachment 154964
That's definitely us two in the staged "fight"
Can't remember where that pic was taken though. Look a bit old for CRANBOURNE ROAD SCHOOL.
Bobx was always your ID on the card in the Hare and Hounds.

Please PM me. Its high time we had a good catch up. I'm in regular touch with Peter Ricketts, Paul Hayes, and Ray Turner.
 

Diane1947

master brummie
That stage brought back memories. I’m not sure how old I was either in top infants, or the first year of junior school. The school put on Peter Pan, and I was chosen to be nana the dog , I kid you not.
I even had a costume made by the school it was brown fur, had a tail, and a head i guess of paper mache, and painted or maybe had fur on it .
The dogs head was fitted over mine, and I could only see out if the mouth.
I had to sing how much is that doggie in the window.
The play was around Christmas time 1955/56, and I remember walking home with Mum, and when we were passing Wanstead Grove we looked up, and saw a shooting star, it was magical.
Of cause after that I had huge aspirations to became an actress for about 6 months.
The stage then looked massive.
 

gazbogt

New Member
The original thread which I started about the school has disappeared, so I'm re-posting below the piece I wrote for this thread of my early memories of the school. It would be great to hear memories from other pupils of the school.

Kingsthorne Infant and Junior School (formerly Cranbourne Road Infant and Junior School)

The school was built in 1931 to accommodate the rapid expansion in the number of families being housed in the newly developed Kingstanding area. Set within a substantial 1930s housing estate, its design and facilities would have been the most up to date in school design. Its modern, low-level architecture was a vastly different to that of the old Victorian schools.

Built around a quadrangle, with a large, central, grass area the school had an air of calmness and security. The edges of the grass quadrangle were surrounded by enclosed walkways and the classrooms facing the large playgrounds to the back and front had covered, but open walkways. Many of the classrooms had views of the playgrounds around its perimeter. All the woodwork for these walkways in the 1950s was painted green. But I believe these were originally brown. The walkway branched away from the school at one point and continued a route towards the outside toilet block. Nearby was a greenhouse and a brick-built air-raid shelter. By the time I attended the school, the original use of the shelter had thankfully passed and it became the secret domain of the caretaker for his tools and equipment. The caretaker's house was on the Cranbourne Road side near the school entrance. Cranbourne Road could be seen down below us from the playground on that side. This seemed to us youngsters like a very steep drop.

Adjacent to the playground, on the Tansley Road side of the school was an enormous brick wall, behind which was a series of wooden huts. Occasionally these huts were used for lessons and it is here that I learned about £ s d. The end hut nearest the Tansley Road school entrance housed a nursery for pre-school children, but I never attended nursery, I went to a childminder.

As for most new pupils, my first day at school at the age of 5 was pretty memorable. On arrival at 9.00 a.m I was allocated my cloakroom peg for my coat and pump bag. I had my own pump bag containing my new plimsoles, some biscuits in a brown paper bag and a sugar mouse. (The sugar mouse was probably not allowed, but was a surprise popped into my bag from my mum).

I was daily mesmerised by the practice of ringing the school hand bell. Sometimes a child would walk along the covered corridor holding the bell upside down by its clapper before swinging it back and forth to announce the start of break, lunch-time or home time. I so hoped that one day I'd be chosen to carry out that job. But that responsibility would have to wait until I reached the junior section of the school.

As the morning progressed, the smell of cooking would slowly waft around the playground. Cooking of school meals was carried out in another row of huts on the Tansley Road side. Liver and onions always springs to mind. Its smell never fails to transport me back to those early school days. Sadly there's no escaping the fact that some of the cooking was not at its best, especially mashed potato and custard. I think almost all school mashed potato across the land has at one time or another suffered with 'black eye' affliction and custard with its lumpy, floury bits.

My first day at school flew past. At 4.00 the boy walked the corridor holding the bell upside down by the clapper and, with a long swing, rang out its sound. I was shocked and disappointed that the day was over. When I politely asked my lovely teacher: "Shall I come back tomorrow?" she kindly replied "Yes please"! I expect she later had a little chuckle about that later on with her colleagues in the staffroom.

The school routine quickly established itself in my mind. Each day started off with assembly in the hall. There was an old record player (with an arm and needle) which was always set to play a piece of classical music as all the classes entered the hall. The most popular piece was the 'flight of the bumblebee' - I don't know if that's the actual title, but that's what we called it. One of the many talks by the Headteacher related the origins of the name of Kingsthorne school. He told us it was inspired by a story about an old man who'd been walking and rested his walking stick on the ground. From that a new shrub grew which had thorns. Now whether that's the actual story or not I can't say, but that's how it registered in my mind. The story most probably contained an important message for us children, but it if did, it by-passed my understanding.

The days in Kingsthorne Infants were filled with wonderful activities: games, talks by interesting people (e.g. road safety!), writing with dipping pens and blotting paper, knitting, sewing and preparing for special events like the Christmas nativity or Harvest Festival. Many absorbing hours were spent making our first Christmas paper lanterns and paper chains which we'd string across the classroom. We also spent much time in the build-up to Christmas rehearsing the Nativity. One year I was chosen to be the Angel Gabriel, the following year I was 'H' in our MERRY CHRISTMAS card line up. At Easter, the line across the classroom would support a host of coloured paper baskets containing little paper easter eggs or chicks. At Harvest Festival we'd be asked to take food into school to contribute to a local care home. It was always a last minute scamble to find something to take in from home and so my contribution could have been anything from a tin of baked beans or digestive biscuits to a beautifully home grown cabbage from our garden.

In the winter or on wet days we had games lessons in the hall. There were the usual benches to balance on and a few climbing bars to clamber up the wall. Our lesson usually started off with throwing small bean bags through enormous hoops on high poles. Not very challenging, but I loved the feel of the bean bag as you tossed it from one hand to the other. Very satisfying.

When the weather was fine, we had rounders games outside in the playground on the Tansley Road side. We sometimes combined games with learning french phrases too. Must have been some modern idea to make it fun to learn another language. We had lessons on handling money in the pretend shop in the huts. And in geography lessons we'd be allowed to check out the weather measurements in a special weather station box which was in the middle of the grass quadrangle. One special geography project involvedthe whole class making a replica of the Elan Valley in papier-mâché. The grass quadrangle was also sometimes used for lessons in summer. I remember making a basic photo out there, with a piece oflino. However, to this day I have no idea how it worked.

The monkey bars (climbing bars) in the side playground near the air-aid shelter were a favourite with us girls at break times. These consisted of a series of bars for swinging on or a climbing frame for crawling up. We had great fun performing acrobatic moves. The bars were like scaffolding and the floor was solid concrete, unlike the soft surfaces playgrounds have today. So it was a risky business performing these gymnastic moves, but that didn't seem to bother us at all.

We had day trips to Kenilworth Castle, Dudley Zoo and Aston Hall. Mum filled the Duffle bag with a Packer Mac, cheese sandwiches wrapped in greaseproof paper and a biscuit. I had a special small, felt purse in the shape of an Austrian hat for my spending money. In my mind I was rich and spent the entire coach journey planning for all the things I was going to buy on the trip.

Miss Mole, Headmistress of the infants section would reward you with dolly mixtures for good work. Her office was up some steps to a second level, but only this part of the school had a second floor, all the classrooms were single storey. I remember very little about Miss Mole, but I vividly remember her highly valued little bags of dolly mixtures.

These days were the happiest schooldays of my life. One day in the not too distant future, the dreaded talk of tests and 11 plus exams would arrive. But for now these were carefree times when each day rolled happily on into the next.


By Viv Walker
i attended Kingsthorne from 1962. Nursery, infants & juniors before going on to complete my education at Kingsrise school for young Ladies & Gentlemen. Thanks Viv. Wonderful descriptive account of your time at Cranbourne road. Jogged so many memories for me. GT.
 
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