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Just Outside Birmingham by Post Card.

Lloyd

master brummie
The rural nature of the Kinver line is illustrated by this pencil drawing by J Stanley Webb of the farm track crossing at Dunsley Meadows, just outside Kinver. The 'feel' of this rural crossing was accurately captured in the road crossing of the tramway at the Black Country Museum at Dudley.
https://www.pbase.com/belvedere/image/69406498

'Excursion' tram services were operated during summer months to Kinver from Birmingham and Smethwick (Windmill Lane) via Oldbury, Tividale, Dudley, Brierley Hill and Amblecote, often using the large bogie single deck cars associated normally with the Cradley Heath area routes, as double deckers were not permitted on the off-road section of the Kinver route. In 1915, despite the country being at war, these excursions netted £1,815.

Kinver was to the Black country what the Lickeys would become to Birmingham, once the tramway reached there.
 

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Ray Griffiths

master brummie
Great Picture of the gardens in Sutton Coldfield did youknow there was two pubs where these gardens are I think they wre The Royal Oak and the the Sun.

Inset in to the wall of the gardens is a metal door I beleive this was to the cellars of one of the pubs.

Across the road from the gardens is a big gateway inside the wall has grooves etched into it this where they would sharpen there arrows before hunting in Sutton Park.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
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I did not contribute much to this thread before the hack attack but I will start now.
This first one is Cheltenham High Street in 1901.
 
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Rupert

master brummie
You know, most cities had streets like this downtown and I do miss them. We had this and if you look at some of the old pictures looking east along High St....Dale End looked a lot like this post by stitch #284.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
Hello Rupert, if we need to keep growing and expanding to be successful, then we are all doomed because there has to be a limit on all things. That is the numbers dealt with.
Nothing that is built today will stand the test of time to the extent of our old buildings that have been demolished, If something has to be replaced it would be nice to see a bit of original style, classic brick/stonework. I agree with you completely Rupert because I have seen it all on my many thousands of miles behind the wheel of a lorry.
I like that High Street one so much here is another one from five years later.
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Stitcher

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Bath always struck me as an idyllic place when I was younger and I still feel the same today. I have not been there for several years now so I suppose it is not as tranquil as I remember it in the 60s and 70s.
This photo is Queens Square in 1901.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
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Feeding the ducks in Bourton On The Water, a loveley place for bed and breakfast with two days sightseeing. The photo was taken in 1955 and there are no prizes if you spot the real pram.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
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Not very well known but a magnificent building, Guy's Cliff. The house is quite close to Warwick Castle. 1892.
 

Rupert

master brummie
It's funny how the senses are affected by sight. Looking at those pictures brought back the aroma of ancient leather in an even more ancient saloon. Must have had a trip out one time. If it was not for the heat of the seat in the sunshine here I think I would get leather one more time. Maybe I might be able to find a spray can of 'ancient leather' at Canadian Tire.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
I know exactly what you mean Rupert, it works the other way around as well, some smells or odours can bring back a flood of memories.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
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This one might be too far away to be classed as 'just outside Birmingham' but it is such a peaceful looking scene that I could not resist it.
It is/was Queen Street in Cardiff. 1893.
 
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Stitcher

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This is not really a postcard but it was not worth starting a thread for it. It is/was the ruins of Illey Mill in Illey Lane Hunnington. I have put it on because it is said locally that a mill has occupied this site since Saxon Times and work has by all accounts started to return it back into its former glory.
 
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Stitcher

Guest
Yes Paul, turn into Illey Lane near the M5 services and go over the motorway, keep going past the pub,(nice lunch there by the way) and the old mill is just a little further along on the left.
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Just to make you homesick, here is a picture of The Black Horse. It has not changed for years Paul.
If I see any alterations going on at the mill I will post another picture.
 

paul stacey

master brummie
Thank you so very much Stitcher, do you know my Dad, Mom, me and my sister Maralyn would walk each Sunday in Summer up from Hasbury Road, to the Black Horse, and back. We kids had Vimto and smiths crisps "with blue bag". and mom and dad had shandy. For years we did this and I remember walking past the old mill. Across the road in a big field was an old medievil tythe barn which had a straw rof and was full of barn owls dad would take me mushrooming in the early mornings sometimes I believe it all went when the M5 was built through. Sometimes when older dad and me would walk right over to the "blue bird toffee factory and back, this all was in the mid 50's.
regards
paul
 
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Stitcher

Guest
I suppose you already know the Bluebird works is no more? The building is still there but it it is let out in units to various firms now.
Of course Paul, the memories you relate are familiar with many of us, different places of course but similar memories. Sadly, memories like this die with us and no more are being made because life is so different today.
 
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