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Jarrett Rainsford & Laughton Wave Grip Makers

rowan

Born a Brummie
I have been sorting out things in the loft & have come across some old fashion wave grips from the war years, they may have been my Mothers or even Grandmothers.
I can just make out the makers name J.R.L BIRMINGHAM ENGLAND.

Can anyone tell me about the makers please. Thank you.
 

rowan

Born a Brummie
Thank you mikejee for your time & answer. I can just make out the word MANNEQUIN above the J.R.L BIRMINGHAM ENGLAND, would there be such a firm with that name?

As our city was famous for being a place of many trades I think they were made there :)) They were the sought of thing that would have styled hair in the 20s 30s & 40s
 

boro keith

master brummie
Hi Rowan
The grips were made by Jarrett, Rainsford & Laughton. You may know them as Laughton and Sons my mother worked for them in the 50s & 60s by then the grips were sold as Lady Jane
 

sistersue61

master brummie
Rowan, I found a box of these when nan died, my girls appropriated them rapidly to style their hair with.
I think there is a thread about Laughtons on here somewhere.
Sue
 

rowan

Born a Brummie
Thank you both very much for your replies. Now i can be content in putting them safely away for anotheer generation to peruse over but this time I will put a little note with them to say who manufactured them in the "olden days"

Thanks again for your help xx
 

rosie

brummie
In a recent episode of "Wartime Farm" Ruth had her hair done with these clamps, and sugar-water! I've got some which were Nan's.
 

rowan

Born a Brummie
I saw that episode too I think that,s what amde me ferret them out & then I saw the name. I remember my Mother using the sugar-water & the wave grips.

By the way is 'wave grips' the correct name for these 'evil' looking things .
 

rosie

brummie
rowan, I've never tried the sugar-water, I would have been afraid of bees and wasps! I've also got some of those flat metal curlers that have a clip in the middle to hold the hair before you roll them up, I don't know the proper name for them.
rosie.
 

brenda barr

master brummie
Rosie, l have used sugar and water to dampen my hair before l rolled my hair up in curlers l think the curlers you are discribing were dinky curlers....l used them to rolled up my hair before l went to bed ....they were hell to sleep on....oh! what we did for beauty....Brenda
 

Dave89

master brummie
An interesting development of JRL was their acquisition in 1920 of Stratton
and Co, which the Laughtons diversified into radio components in the middle 1920s.
This became the well known Eddystone Radio Company which continued for another
70+years. The radios continued to carry the company name Stratton & Co.

Kind regards

Dave
 

Claribel

master brummie
My mother used to work for a company called Carola Products which used to make Dinky hairgrips and curlers. The factory was in Rabone Lane Smethwick.
 

Nico

master brummie
Rosie led me to this post JRL, as my nan had some too, She called them Marcel wavers which made Marcel waves. I beleive he was a hairdesser. Mum used to say there was a Mr Teasie Weasie too. He was on TV.
I used to play with the wavers but they were lethal. YEs I put them in my hair. It looks like they are still in it! They were all different sizes and would withstand any amount of heat on them. My Aunty had the fire irons which she put in the open fire then the dipped them in water then curles round a paper then on to the hair. made nice curls. One arm of the tong was round and the other arm wrapped around it,, Nan also spoke about hair crimpers.
 
W

Wendy

Guest
Goodness I still have some of my Nan's wave crimpers. When I started in hairdressing in 1968 waving was part of an exam. We had a sort of gel the waves were formed by hand and flat clips used to hold the wave. I remember Teasy Weasy, Raymond and of course Vidal Sassoon. My mother used hot irons on my hair heated on the gas stove and tested on paper before being used on my hair still scary though. One of the first to invent a hair grip was Newey of Newey and Ayre when he made money he changed to electrical components.
I remember my brother worked for a company called John Church who supplied all sorts including pins and needles. I will have to ask him where they were located.
 

Nico

master brummie
Goodness I still have some of my Nan's wave crimpers. When I started in hairdressing in 1968 waving was part of an exam. We had a sort of gel the waves were formed by hand and flat clips used to hold the wave. I remember Teasy Weasy, Raymond and of course Vidal Sassoon. My mother used hot irons on my hair heated on the gas stove and tested on paper before being used on my hair still scary though. One of the first to invent a hair grip was Newey of Newey and Ayre when he made money he changed to electrical components.
I remember my brother worked for a company called John Church who supplied all sorts including pins and needles. I will have to ask him where they were located.
I used to work for Newy and Ayre my first full time job. Mates used to say, where do you work, I would tell them, and they would say, what? Newey ane 'oo eie?
 

Nico

master brummie
Jarretts made a lot of products including double chin reducers! https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Jarrett,_Rainsford_and_Laughton

Here are the grips (top left side of image) mentioned in original post. Viv.

View attachment 107249
We found some old french curlers of my partner's mum's. With the bobble on elastic at the end. Some were covered in soft spines? Like furry caterpillars. I like their French name of bigoudis. Bee goody. I remember mum using curler papers too she said to stop them burning her head.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
An interesting development of JRL was their acquisition in 1920 of Stratton &Co

Dave
In the mid-50s, most of the girls I knew were "Comptometer Operators", (whatever THAT was !), and most of my mates were apprentice toolmakers at Twinco Stratton, as we called it then.
It was a local firm for us and employed a lot of local people.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
I remember Stratton powder compacts for ladies. They were regarded as quality items. Sold by the likes of Rackhams. Viv.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
I remember Stratton powder compacts for ladies. They were regarded as quality items. Sold by the likes of Rackhams. Viv.
I've just been up to check and sure enough, I have a pair of my late Dad's cufflinks, (Laughing Cavalier), made by Stratton, England.
He thought they were posh !
 
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