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Is this in Birmingham?

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
rotary club sign in summer lane ...not that i am suggesting the photo is taken there

 

RayJones4

proper brummie kid
Given that the Easter Rising took place in 1916, the religious tensions would have been high at the time. The route may well have been known, and the Union Jacks could be a show of allegiance.
This could well be around 1916 & maybe there is some tension in this photo.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
In 1914, in Preston there was to be the annual RC Whit Monday procession. The church informed that they would carry a statue of the Madonna and Child. This was opposed by Chief Constable, but the Mayor decided it should go ahead.

The procession at one point was subject to stones being thrown.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I am not sure about it being a Catholic procession. The minister is wearing a cope but he is not carrying anything, which Catholic priests frequently did in processions. This looks like it could turn into another No.8 bus thread. :D
 

Radiorails

master brummie
1603640803470.png
I think this was the herald of the school of St. Catherine's,
If this relates then the area should be around the streets near the older church. It was demolished and replaced by a new church in the mid sixties. The second banner does seem similar.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
to be honest pedro i can only see :grinning:.in my experience the people who had photos taken back then usually looked serious ......even the dog has turned his back :D
i thought that lyn.but did not like to say. they looked like they were chewing wasps. :grinning:
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
All the hats are decorated with flowers. The collars on the men and boys look 1920s to me. The sashes worn by the girls are a unifying feature between the different groups with their specific banner. Do the sashes represent a cause or movement ? Do the flowers on the hats represent Easter ? Why aren’t there many boys in the line up? Do the girls represent purity? Viv.
 
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oldMohawk

master brummie
Looks rather like 'Whit Walks' which were held each year in the early 1900s in the Greater Manchester area and surrounding districts such as Saddleworth. I not sure whether it was a tradition in the Midlands.
Typical Whit Walk
WhitWalk.jpg
 
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RayJones4

proper brummie kid
Looks rather like 'Whit Walks' which were held each year in the early 1900s in the Greater Manchester area and surrounding districts such as Saddleworth. I not sure whether it was a tradition in the Midlands.
Typical Whit Walk
View attachment 149579
My image is also posted on a Facebook Unidentified photo group where I state Birmingham or Manchester area as I have seen many Whit-type postcards over the years from that area. But they do not have that street architecture in my view from many searches I have made but which screams at me from some of the great images on this site (I love some of your images). What is missing from my Birmingham searches are similar processions. It is also interesting that no one so far has spotted a possible location. I could be wrong but there is a late Victorian/Edwardian building style in Brum that does not seem to exist even locally in the Black Country & Coventry; & certainly not in my area of expertise: Worcester, Redditch, Bromsgrove, Kidderminster. I would be interested in your thoughts as to whether it could be Birmingham: images seem to be lacking from certain areas of that close-knit terraced housing belt around central Brum. I am not sure if it is worth checking this all out (but I enjoy learning more about Brum). Actually there are subtle differences between traditional Whit-type walks & my image which makes it even more frustrating. I am certain that the part of the procession shown in my image does have a Roman Catholic context.
 

RayJones4

proper brummie kid
All the hats are decorated with flowers. The collars on the men and boys look 1920s to me. The sashes worn by the girls are a unifying feature between the different groups with their specific banner. Do the sashes represent a cause or movement ? Do the flowers on the hats represent Easter ? Why aren’t there many boys in the line up? Do the girls represent purity? Viv.
The likelihood is that this photo was taken during WW1 because of the news poster concerning the war. I would posit that it is not Edwardian.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
i agree it does seem like it has a catholic context and also that those houses look like brummie houses but other than that i am stumped but will keep searching

lyn
 

pjmburns

master brummie
From my childhood I know that Catholic churches held 2 processions - May (for Mary) and June (Corpus Christi for First Communions) - in my case boys and girls processed together. That was one difference - another was that girls did not wear sashes but the boys did - blue for Mary and dark red for Corpus Christi. Another difference was that we were only one parish but we did have grounds to process round. I wonder if the city centre churches joined together and processed round the streets (perhaps near St Chads) as they had no grounds to process round? The other puzzle, for me, is the banners - but I do know some parishes had a church banner and perhaps that was used to indicate the churches processing. For both I think we had flower girls - in our case we scattered petals but I imagine that might not be possible in the streets.
 

RobT

master brummie
How about Devon Street, Birmingham 7 (Ran between Duddeston Mill Road & Saltley Road)

The procession could be going to - St. Anne's Church (Top left corner of map) School other side of the road.

Remember C. Lee (Charles Lee) 87 Devon Street, window name could have been advertising shop just along road.

End house by Church is No. 34 and they number 34, 35, 36 etc which I think makes 87 the end shop/house

Devon street map.jpg


devon-street-1950-400.jpg

St Anne's Church demolished in 1951 I believe

 
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Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
great minds rob...i have been looking at devon st myself although if the photo is of catholic context i think st annes was c of e

lyn
 
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