• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Hybrid & electric cars

izzy eckerslike

Yaw've med my day yaw ave
Have any of you gone all electric or are driving a hybrid? I've been driving a Prius for over 10 years, a 2nd hand Gen 2 and now a Gen 4 I had from new.
It's a lot more powerful than the Gen 2 and also far more economical. A 1.8 engine boosted by an electric motor coupled to a seamless sun & planet gearbox give very powerful acceleration regardless of Prius milk float jokes.
I can easily get over 80mpg on a long trip but less on the return. It's all to do with the lie of the land, if you start off at the top of a long shallow hill then you might get 120mpg going down but 60-70 coming back up.
Some of the recent adverts for hybrid vehicles ( not plug in) say that you will be in electric mode 50% of the time, that's very misleading, what it should say is the engine will be off 50% of your trip which more or less what happens. You take your foot off the accelerator and the engine instantly stops so you can coast up to junctions, islands and along slight downward inclines which also adds charge to the battery. The engine continues turning but not firing in the cylinders so when it turns back on it's seamless.
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
Izzy, we are currently looking at another car. As you know driving distances in the US are considerable. We have ruled out the full electric at this time because the infrastructure is not in-place to support and where there are charging stations they are not enough. Also we keep our cars for 10 or 12 years or more. The battery replacement and disposal costs are very high.
From what I have seen the hybrid or smaller(relatively) displacement turbo charged engine is the way to go given the type of driving and market we are in. Currently we have two cars with the same V6 displacement engines 8 years a part, the newer car gets 20+% better mileage on the same driving.
I think you are on the right track!
 

Bob Johnson

master brummie
Have any of you gone all electric or are driving a hybrid? I've been driving a Prius for over 10 years, a 2nd hand Gen 2 and now a Gen 4 I had from new.
It's a lot more powerful than the Gen 2 and also far more economical. A 1.8 engine boosted by an electric motor coupled to a seamless sun & planet gearbox give very powerful acceleration regardless of Prius milk float jokes.
I can easily get over 80mpg on a long trip but less on the return. It's all to do with the lie of the land, if you start off at the top of a long shallow hill then you might get 120mpg going down but 60-70 coming back up.
Some of the recent adverts for hybrid vehicles ( not plug in) say that you will be in electric mode 50% of the time, that's very misleading, what it should say is the engine will be off 50% of your trip which more or less what happens. You take your foot off the accelerator and the engine instantly stops so you can coast up to junctions, islands and along slight downward inclines which also adds charge to the battery. The engine continues turning but not firing in the cylinders so when it turns back on it's seamless.
I am on my second Nissan Leaf (100% electric). I will be exchanging my present Leaf for my third 'all electric' vehicle in March 2022.
Would I replace it with a petrol/diesel engine vehicle? NO.
I wouldn't say that 100% electric vehicles are going to be the saviour of the world as we keep being told, but they do have their place in the transport system.
I think one of the main factors that stops people buying an electric vehicle is the perceived lack of charging points.
There are almost 20,000 electric vehicle charging points in the U.K to date.
When you own an all electric vehicle the thing most people find difficult is planning their journey between charging points plus having an alternative charging point if the one you visit is out of order or being used.
Cost of running is dirt cheap (I know they are expensive when new).
I pay 15p per kw/h at home, this is my most expensive day time rate. Driven carefully I achieve 4miles per kw. This works out at about £1.50 per 40 miles of travel. A petrol engine vehicle giving you 40 mpg would cost £6.00 approx.
 

izzy eckerslike

Yaw've med my day yaw ave
I pay 15p per kw/h at home, this is my most expensive day time rate. Driven carefully I achieve 4miles per kw. This works out at about £1.50 per 40 miles of travel. A petrol engine vehicle giving you 40 mpg would cost £6.00 approx.
The overall mpg on my Prius is 67.2 over 18,000 miles. short trips, particularly in winter account for lower mpg. I can drive 12 miles to Stratford and it will show around 85mpg, coming back it will be about 73, once again it's the lie of the land.
How does your Nissan keep you warm in winter and how much does it tank the battery when you are driving with lights & wipers going plus the heater?
 

Bob Johnson

master brummie
The overall mpg on my Prius is 67.2 over 18,000 miles. short trips, particularly in winter account for lower mpg. I can drive 12 miles to Stratford and it will show around 85mpg, coming back it will be about 73, once again it's the lie of the land.
How does your Nissan keep you warm in winter and how much does it tank the battery when you are driving with lights & wipers going plus the heater?
The Leaf has heated seats and steering wheel plus the usual cabin heater. The car/cabin heater works almost as soon as the ignition is turned on. The heater is a refrigerator in reverse ( a heat pump).
If it is freezing cold, with the heater and lights on I would loose about 20% of battery range, this would still give a range of 100 miles approx.
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
The Leaf has heated seats and steering wheel plus the usual cabin heater. The car/cabin heater works almost as soon as the ignition is turned on. The heater is a refrigerator in reverse ( a heat pump).
If it is freezing cold, with the heater and lights on I would loose about 20% of battery range, this would still give a range of 100 miles approx.
Bob, the new Leaf (US version) has an option for a 62kwh battery vs 40 standard. This gives approximately 226 miles so with you weather discount you should be at 180 miles which is quite good!
 

Spargone

master brummie
I pay 15p per kw/h at home, this is my most expensive day time rate. Driven carefully I achieve 4miles per kw. This works out at about £1.50 per 40 miles of travel. A petrol engine vehicle giving you 40 mpg would cost £6.00 approx.
If electricity was charged the same way as petrol you would be paying about 34.8p per kWh! If 'everyone' goes electric will that be what will happen?
 

Chunky AC

master brummie
We have our second KIA Niro, 4. It’s a joy to drive without the anxiety of an all electric, just this weekend achieved over 60mpg, with the air con on, and the lights. No worries if we have enough power to complete the journey. Or if the charging points will work when up you get there. Hybrid is the answer until we get Hydrogen fed internal combustion engines.
Kia build quality is outstanding and backed by the 7 year warranty. We would not hesitate to buy another.
 
Last edited:

Richard Dye

master brummie
We have a KIA Niro, 4. It’s a joy to drive without the anxiety of an all electric, just this weekend achieved over 60mpg, with the air con on, and the lights. No worries if we have enough power to complete the journey. Or if the charging points will work when up you get there. Hybrid is the answer until we get Hydrogen fed internal combustion engines.
Kia build quality is outstanding and backed by the 7 year warranty. We would not hesitate to buy another.
Yes, the green hydrogen is very good already powering locomotives in Austria and growing quickly. Going to be awhile for passenger cars although expect something from Kia/Hyundai and a few others early
 

izzy eckerslike

Yaw've med my day yaw ave
When I ordered my Prius I chose the 15" wheels, I'm not interested in how prettier the car looks on 17" low profile tyres.
It makes a lot of difference to the mpg, could be as much as 10mpg and also mine (2016) is still registered as 70g/km and was London congestion charge exempt but not now apparently as they keep moving the goalposts. 17" wheels are currently 82g/km

In 2018 Toyota raised the 15" to 78g/km. It says 15" wheels and 70g/km on my cars documents, you cannot legally change the wheels size without notifying the DVLA because of the difference in C02 levels
 
Last edited:

Eric Gibson

master brummie
There are a series of videos online for anyone interested in EV under the title 'Fully Charged.' run by the robot from 'Red Dwarf'. ;) Well worth following.
 

izzy eckerslike

Yaw've med my day yaw ave
We have our second KIA Niro, 4. It’s a joy to drive without the anxiety of an all electric, just this weekend achieved over 60mpg, with the air con on, and the lights. No worries if we have enough power to complete the journey. Or if the charging points will work when up you get there. Hybrid is the answer until we get Hydrogen fed internal combustion engines.
Kia build quality is outstanding and backed by the 7 year warranty. We would not hesitate to buy another.
What are averaging for mpg, I just looked at a review for your car and it says 'Officially, you can travel for up to three miles on electric power alone, at speeds of up to 70mph' is that correct or is it yet another example of misleading reviews?

I can drive for e.g along a particular section of the M42 for about 3 miles at 60-70mph with the engine off and the EV green light on but the battery is not really pulling the car but just assisting freewheeling due to the level or slight downhill road.
Any attempt to stay in EV mode at those speeds on a slight incline upwards and it will fire up the engine and I'm guessing most hybrids do the same thing.
I never ever press the EV button because it beeps and cuts off at around 35mph. But I can drive it with the engine off with the electric motor actually powering the vehicle at any speed up to 70mph for a mile or so as long as it's not uphill
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
Since I now do only a small annual mileage the cost of my motoring is ruled by the depreciation of the car. My current diesel vehicle, based upon its list price and its present value according to “we buy any car” has depreciated by £25,000 in the 3 years I have had it. As I have recently clocked up 10,000 miles the depreciation charge is £2.50 per mile. Were I to change the car now, for an electric car of similar make and specification, (sun roof, electric seats, tinted glass etc etc) I would be parting with another £35,000. If you can see any logic in my going electric please let me know.

Incidentally, I consider my contribution to the health of the planet to be the reduction in my annual mileage to about one eighth of what I used to do.
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
Since I now do only a small annual mileage the cost of my motoring is ruled by the depreciation of the car. My current diesel vehicle, based upon its list price and its present value according to “we buy any car” has depreciated by £25,000 in the 3 years I have had it. As I have recently clocked up 10,000 miles the depreciation charge is £2.50 per mile. Were I to change the car now, for an electric car of similar make and specification, (sun roof, electric seats, tinted glass etc etc) I would be parting with another £35,000. If you can see any logic in my going electric please let me know.

Incidentally, I consider my contribution to the health of the planet to be the reduction in my annual mileage to about one eighth of what I used to do.
Totally agree! In our case the car we are looking to change is almost 13 years old with 148,000 mile (not that many). Our problem is that what was once a very reliable car is no longer!
 

Chunky AC

master brummie
What are averaging for mpg, I just looked at a review for your car and it says 'Officially, you can travel for up to three miles on electric power alone, at speeds of up to 70mph' is that correct or is it yet another example of misleading reviews?

I can drive for e.g along a particular section of the M42 for about 3 miles at 60-70mph with the engine off and the EV green light on but the battery is not really pulling the car but just assisting freewheeling due to the level or slight downhill road.
Any attempt to stay in EV mode at those speeds on a slight incline upwards and it will fire up the engine and I'm guessing most hybrids do the same thing.
I never ever press the EV button because it beeps and cuts off at around 35mph. But I can drive it with the engine off with the electric motor actually powering the vehicle at any speed up to 70mph for a mile or so as long as it's not uphill
Hello Vic,
Driving in electric mode or in petrol mode is not an option as I see it. The electric power is there as a boost to assist the petrol engine. It is possible to be driving on flat roads where the petrol engine is not used with all of the power coming from electric motor. But start to climb any hills and. The petrol engine cuts in to take over. Pulling away from a standing start the power comes from the electric motor thereby reducing the high revs required from the petrol engine. All of this happens automatically without any driver intervention. The power from the electric motor is certainly noticeable especially if you put your foot down. This is all in the standard drive mode. In sports mode the acceleration is outstanding. My on board computer tells me my driving style is 73% economical, 25% normal and 2% sports. Hence the 60mpg. last weekend. AC.
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
I've been in the motor trade all my life and never bought a new car for myself, that depreciation hits as soon as you roll out of the showroom. I'm driving a 2.0 Litre Citroen diesel estate now that I found in a field missing its automatic gearbox, bought it for £150, bought a s/h box for £400 and fitted it, had it now for nearly five years.
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
In the case of Richard’s 148k miler, I see the options open to him as limited only to whatever style car he thinks is best for himself. My choice of car is limited only by a liking for a nice new car every so often, and the application of a certain amount of logic which is leading me to the conclusion that my present car will be kept for a good while yet.
 

Chunky AC

master brummie
I've been in the motor trade all my life and never bought a new car for myself, that depreciation hits as soon as you roll out of the showroom. I'm driving a 2.0 Litre Citroen diesel estate now that I found in a field missing its automatic gearbox, bought it for £150, bought a s/h box for £400 and fitted it, had it now for nearly five years.
I had a very early Citroen BX, finished up having three in total, very comfortable ride with the hydro suspension, all three I had for three years or more and all did more than 130K miles in each of them. Never had a problem with any of them. So reliable despite their reputation.
 
Top