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Hot water bottles

rosie

brummie
When I was a child my hot water bottle was made of brown "crock" as we called it. My brother had a larger one and I still have both of them although they haven't been used for sixty years at least! We also had a rubber one in the shape of a dog, rather like a soft toy but with no stuffing. I didn't like the crock one after it had gone cold and I was frightened in case I knocked it out of bed.
rosie.
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
i had a rubber hot watter bottle. one night i got in bed and ooo the bed was soaked. the dachshund had chewed it to bits.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Could be worse Pete. My mother had an aluminium one (sounds silly I know). She went to sleep with it close to her chest and woke up with a painful burnt chest.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I've seen all three in my time, but I always termed the metal ones as dangerous. The crock ones were OK to warm the bed up an hour before you got in and then stand it on the floor. Rubber ones had that peculiar smell. On the whole you can't beat an electric blanket.

Maurice :cool:
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
Could be worse Pete. My mother had an aluminium one (sounds silly I know). She went to sleep with it close to her chest and woke up with a painful burnt chest.
we had one they were dangerous with out a sock on them. as that comic said "too risky"
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
I am sure they made an electric hot water bottle once. Made from Bakelite it had a plug socket on the neck where the stopper would normally go.
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
During the war, I imagine that pre-war rubber hot water bottles would not have lasted for the duration. And supplies of new ones would have been non-existent. For that reason my childhood recollection is entirely of crock bottles. Sometimes one of those made especially for the purpose with a large diameter screw cap halfway down their length. And sometimes, in our house, one of the crock bottles which the ginger beer came in. “Stone’s Ginger Beer” I think it was called. They worked very well but still didn’t prevent regular chilblains.

Always wanted to see in use the copper warming pan which hung on the wall as an ornament. But that was never resorted to.

Chris
 
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