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Holyhead Road

V

Villan

Guest
Anyone live near to 64 Holyhead Road during the late 70's early 80's?
 
V

Villan

Guest
Thank's Craig.
I'm trying to produce a history of a small school that was located at no.64. It was demolished about 20 years ago. I'm trying to locate anyone in the immediate area who knew what happened to the headmistress etc.
 
C

colinwilliams1

Guest
Hi

use friends reunited there is usually all information about schools in brum
 
V

Villan

Guest
Thank's chaps - some good leads here. I knew I could rely on you!
 

Ian FOFB

Brummie yes ! Novice no !
The images referred to in the following two posts are no longer available.

The 'then' pictures are taken from old postcards, the 'now' pictures taken from Google Streetview.
The older of the pictures is thought to date from the 1910's, featuring the New Inns

Ian.
 
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Ian FOFB

Brummie yes ! Novice no !
And another couple of Holyhead Road and the New Inns.
The 'then' pictures are taken from old postcards, the 'now' pictures taken from Google Streetview.
The older of the pictures is thought to date from the 1900's.

Ian.
 

valerieexbrummie

knowlegable brummie
Hi. Just seen your thread re Holyhead rd. was 64 woodville private school .
i went there 1947 to 1950
miss Parker was headmistress. There was a mrs Coe and a muss Ashmore. I lived off island rd
Let me know Valerieexbrummie
 

Bryn Meurig

knowlegable brummie
Thank's Craig.
I'm trying to produce a history of a small school that was located at no.64. It was demolished about 20 years ago. I'm trying to locate anyone in the immediate area who knew what happened to the headmistress etc.
I grew up just off Soho Road in the 1950s, but didn't remember the school at all. However, I have just Googled "Woodville Private School, Holyhead Road, Handsworth" - found quite a bit of information for you, and it jogged my memory, too!
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
This thread starts with the query asking if anyone lived near 64 Holyhead Road in 70s and early 80s.

Can’t help there but the picture from the Tatler of October 1904 shows Peggy Silvester of number 66. One of the contestants for the Tatler Silver Cup, a Pretty Children competition, I wonder if she won?

6270D184-8270-42A5-84AB-60640C530F3F.jpeg
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
nice photo viv...not able to confirm its holyhead road but i would not bet against it as lot of what are main roads now looked like that at one time...what makes me think this is casting my mind back to the mystery cottage photo thread in great barr...

lyn
 

Radiorails

master brummie
It is a lovely old photo of Holyhead Road. It might be the part that runs within Birmingham but the name Holyhead Road is a generic term for the A5 - London to Holyhead road - so it could be anywhere. I will watch this thread with interest.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
It is a lovely old photo of Holyhead Road. It might be the part that runs within Birmingham but the name Holyhead Road is a generic term for the A5 - London to Holyhead road - so it could be anywhere. I will watch this thread with interest.
I remember being told that Holyhead Road was part of the old London to Holyhead Road, long before the present route along the A5. It seems that an Act of parliament in 1815 gave rise to the route and Thomas Telford was the engineer.

Looking through the Archives the 4th report in 1828 informs for the Birmingham section... “After passing the bridge, the street has been widened by taking down several houses. The road up the hill has had its pavement broken up and converted to broken stone which has rendered that steep hill less dangerous.”

And in October 1833 the advert below was placed in Aris's Birmingham Gazette. No it couldn’t be could it?
6970E3D1-F3E0-4467-B30E-1491EF71CCF5.jpeg
 

Ronald Harbidge

New Member
The Holyhead Road showing the former New Inns pub. The pub building and the Victorian parade of shops next to the parked vehicle on the right are still there. Viv.
View attachment 106614

View attachment 106615
Hello

This thread I read with interest. In 1970, I attended an Employment Rehabilitation Centre in Holyhead Road, Handsworth for 6 weeks. The main rehabilitation buildings where on the left hand side near the junction of Island Road. Across the road was the administration offices and canteen for the service users. Obviously, at the time I was out of work and needed help in getting on the right path for suitable alternative employment. Any knowledge or photographs of the of these buildings would be much appreciated.

originally, the Government Rehabilitation Centres where started up by Remploy. Recently I Google earthed this location and flats have been built on the left and a supermarket is on the other side of the road. The social worker employed there was Mrs Humphreys. Not only was she very professional in her job, she was a true lady. Online, I have seen a photograph of the greenhouses in the grounds of the Employment Rehabilitation Centre in Edgbaston taken in 1973.
 
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mw0njm.

A Brummie Vampire
It is a lovely old photo of Holyhead Road. It might be the part that runs within Birmingham but the name Holyhead Road is a generic term for the A5 - London to Holyhead road - so it could be anywhere. I will watch this thread with interest.
I traveled the length of the A5 from Hinkley to Holyhead on my m/bike. a old roman rd Watling st. it never went through bham. tamworth.canock staffs and all stations north.
 

Ronald Harbidge

New Member
The road slopes the right way, but did Holyhead Road have a tramway?View attachment 139949
To the best of my knowledge, trams did run along Holyhead Road from Birmingham City Centre to West Bromwich. In 1970, I used to travel on a bus from Wednesbury to Handsworth and many of the lamp standards through West Bromwich town centre were so obviously ones used to support the overhead wires for electric trams.
 
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