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High Park Street, Nechells

Ivor Williams

master brummie
I went to St Clements School in High Park Street.I left in 1953 aged 15 and it then became an infant and juniors only school.
Any one else out there from that time?
Bryan.
g
I remember Mr Hill. He was tall and thin and had a moustache. When I became a junior he sometimes did Playground Duty in the boys playground at the side of the school building. The older boys alerted us to the fact that Mr Hill would get us to line up at the end of playtime. Having done that, he would turn his back on us. Then, he would watch us in the reflection of his spectacles to see who was fidgeting or whispering, etc. But, thanks to the tip-off from the older boys, we always stood motionless and silent.
Also, there were three first floor classrooms that could be directly accessed via the iron staircase.
 
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Ivor Williams

master brummie
nice pic phil...the mitre is still open..my sister and her work mates were in there over christmas...
sorry i cant name that pub on the corner as im lost over that way but im still looking for a good pic of the one that was on the corner of holborn hill and longacre as my sisters house now sits on the ground..think it was called the white swan but i will have to double check on that one..

lyn

Hi, Lyn! The pub on the corner of Long Acre and Holborn Hill was called the White Horse. On the day that we celebrated the Coronation (I think it was a Saturday but I'm not sure if it was the actual Coronation Day) tables were laid out from the bottom to the top of Malvern Hill Road. But, before we sat down to eat, it rained. Things were hastily re-arranged and nearby pubs shared the task of providing rooms for the kids to eat their food. I was with a crowd who were sent to the room above the bar of the White Horse, corner of Long Acre and Holborn Hill.
 
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Ivor Williams

master brummie
I think this must be the photo of 68 (I've certainly labelled it that). There are also two photos of St Clements church at different timesView attachment 115163 View attachment 115164 View attachment 115165
Also a photo of St Clements school.
View attachment 122898
The nearest ground floor windows in this photo of St Clement's were those of the Head Office. Mrs Schofield was headmistress during my years at the school, 1949-1956. She always led morning assemblies in the upstairs junior hall in the far wing and then spent the rest of her time in the Head Office. The windows above the Head Office were those of Class One from where pupils left when old enough to go to Senior School.


I think this must be the photo of 68 (I've certainly labelled it that). There are also two photos of St Clements church at different timesView attachment 115163 View attachment 115164 View attachment 115165
Also a photo of St Clements school.
View attachment 122898
 

landcrab9

knowlegable brummie
g
I remember Mr Hill. He was tall and thin and had a moustache. When I became a junior he sometimes did Playground Duty in the boys playground at the side of the school building. The older boys alerted us to the fact that Mr Hill would get us to line up at the end of playtime. Having done that, he would turn his back on us. Then, he would watch us in the reflection of his spectacles to see who was fidgeting or whispering, etc. But, thanks to the tip-off from the older boys, we always stood motionless and silent.
Also, there were three classrooms that could be directly accessed via the iron staircase.
Ivor,
I always found Mr Hill to be a nice man, a very good teacher. Yes the class immediately off the iron staircase was Mr Hill's, The one to the left off that one was the wonderful Mrs Gray and the one to the right as you went in was Mr McAllister's. He only had one eye and wore a leather eye patch over the bad one. He retired and I met him in Erdington high street a few years later after I had finished my national service.
Bryan
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
nice pic. we went to that church. for sunday school. as infants we went to st clements school. that seems like a hundred years ago. one of the teachers there cained my brother,he went home with a wail mark still on is bum. mom went to the school,and i thought she was going to put the teachers lights out.
nice pic. we went to that church. for sunday school. as infants we went to st clements school. that seems like a hundred years ago. one of the teachers there cained my brother,he went home with a wail mark still on is bum. mom went to the school,and i thought she was going to put the teachers lights out.
nice pic. we went to that church. for sunday school. as infants we went to st clements school. that seems like a hundred years ago. one of the teachers there cained my brother,he went home with a wail mark still on is bum. mom went to the school,and i thought she was going to put the teachers lights out.
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
Hi Bryan

Yes there a few of us on 'Friends reunited' from St Clements.
I have the school register for enrolment from 1943 to 1946. Can't see a bryan with a 'Y' recorded.
I was there from 1944 to 1951 then off to Elliot St school.
Bob Steele
 

Ivor Williams

master brummie
I knew a Bob Steele at St Clement's. He was taller than me and had black hair. I last saw him behind the counter of a newsagent shop in Great Barr, Greenholme Road, if memory serves.
 

Phil

Retired Layabout
A couple of images of High Park Street I have come across since I last posted to this thread. One is of the Red Lion c1966 which couldn't have been that long before it closed as I believe that was in 1967.

The second photo must date from around that time also by the look of it, it's an aerial view looking down High park Street.

Nechells Red Lion Thinble Mill Lane.jpgNechells High Park St.jpg
 
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Ivor Williams

master brummie
Thanks for the photos, retired layabout. I remember a bloke who regularly stood in the doorway of the pub collecting bits of money wrapped in notepaper on which was written the names of the horses various people thought would win the day's race meeting. It was illegal to bet in the fifties and so the passing of the money was done very quickly with hardly a word spoken between the hopeful punter and the bookie's runner.
 
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