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Herbert Austin and his early years in Alma St should a Blue Plaque for Herbert Austin be erected

horsencart

master brummie
Alma Street Blue Plague Herbert Austin

I would like to suggest that either a Blue Plague or some sort of commemoration be erected in Alma St Aston, and the reason for my suggestion is as follows,

The Commemoration would be for both Herbert Austin and the early years of car building in Birmingham,

In Alma St in the late 1800,s he (Herbert Austin )was building cars, and driving them, the buildings were this took place still existed till 2008, there were demolished in that year, there was a lone voice against its destruction and that was the author Norman Painting the problem with lone voices is they are not heard in the progress of the modern world,

I would be a shame that in some way the work that was done in this street is remembered, Birmingham should be proud of its involvement in the early history of the motor car, we are to late to save the buildings but lets keep the memory alive for the future generations,

I did manage to photograph the building before they were demolished

https://flic.kr/p/PqPBsh
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
There is these plaques in Longbridge.

This one in New Austin Park.



Plus these blue plaques in the Austin Village close to Northfield.



 

boomy

master brummie
Alma Street Blue Plague Herbert Austin

I would like to suggest that either a Blue Plague or some sort of commemoration be erected in Alma St Aston, and the reason for my suggestion is as follows,

The Commemoration would be for both Herbert Austin and the early years of car building in Birmingham,

In Alma St in the late 1800,s he (Herbert Austin )was building cars, and driving them, the buildings were this took place still existed till 2008, there were demolished in that year, there was a lone voice against its destruction and that was the author Norman Painting the problem with lone voices is they are not heard in the progress of the modern world,

I would be a shame that in some way the work that was done in this street is remembered, Birmingham should be proud of its involvement in the early history of the motor car, we are to late to save the buildings but lets keep the memory alive for the future generations,

I did manage to photograph the building before they were demolished

https://flic.kr/p/PqPBsh
Yes, I did try to get some interest in a blue plaque being erected in Alma Street, Aston, and although the Birmingham Post did an article about it, and a newspaper reporter from Coventry actually came over to Brum to visit the factory, the factory owner was not too pleased about all the interest because he was already suffering from regular vandalism
However, I did publish a book about this subject "Herbert Austin - His Wolseley Years", so the memory of Austin and his first cars being built in Alma Street will, hopefully, be kept alive.
Regards,
Boomy
 

horsencart

master brummie
I have just finished reading the book £15.00 from any decent book shop it the pity is that the building has now gone I would have love to have gone for a walk in the building, sadly it was not to be



Yes, I did try to get some interest in a blue plaque being erected in Alma Street, Aston, and although the Birmingham Post did an article about it, and a newspaper reporter from Coventry actually came over to Brum to visit the factory, the factory owner was not too pleased about all the interest because he was already suffering from regular vandalism
However, I did publish a book about this subject "Herbert Austin - His Wolseley Years", so the memory of Austin and his first cars being built in Alma Street will, hopefully, be kept alive.
Regards,
Boomy
 

boomy

master brummie
Yes but it isn't at Alma St were it all started !
Austin's history certainly did not start at Longbridge.
Herbert Austin built his first motor car in 1896 at the Wolseley Sheep Shearing Machine Company factory in Alma Street, Aston, so it was nearly 10 years later before the Longbridge works were even involved!
Boomy
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I've had past battles with the Civic Society over the Theatre Royal and it really isn't worth the effort. On the other hand, it you put the money up front, it will almost appear tomorrow! :)

Maurice
 

boomy

master brummie
I've had past battles with the Civic Society over the Theatre Royal and it really isn't worth the effort. On the other hand, it you put the money up front, it will almost appear tomorrow! :)

Maurice
Some people do not seem to understand the importance of having a plaque, or some form of recognition, to be put up in Alma Street, Aston.
Its not about Herbert Austin the man, more about the fact that the factory was at the very birth of the motor industry in Birmingham and its products were exported all over the world.
Boomy
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
As well as 6 red plaques about the Longbridge Austin Car Factory, they have also installed these boards at Longbridge Town Centre.

Star Map of 4th November 1905 what Lord Austin might have seen at 9.00pm that evening.



Map of the plant around 1985.



I've only found 5 out of the 6 plaques in Longbridge. See them here on Open Plaques http://openplaques.org/series/155

Found 3 last week, and 2 today. Couldn't find the Sewing Shop.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
From what I have read, at various times, Blue Plaques come in two versions.
Those 'officially' approved and on a list which people can use when wanting to visit them; the others are 'unofficial' ones put up by a group wishing to honour or commemorate a person or building.

This is a list of plaques I have found, relevant to the West Midlands. Whether they are all 'official' or not it does not say. Not all are 'blue'; there are many brass ones. Post 1#, by Horsencart says the building is demolished now. I do not know what is there now, but maybe a new building owner might be interested. A brass plaque seems more appropriate than a blue one to me, after all that was one of the metals greatly used in many forms of manufacturing.

 
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