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Heaton St Hockley

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
if anyone has any old photos of heaton st could you post them here please folks

cheers

lyn
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
great start to the thread carolina...it does not matter if they have been on the forum before as we need them on their own thread:)

lyn
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
hi folks..went to the library today but the photos of heaton st they have have already been posted on here so our search continues

lyn
 
This Picture was from an old article that was published in The Bham Evening Mail also captioned as being heaton st 1950s.jpg Heaton St Hockley.
 

Peg Monkey

master brummie
The 1956 Heaton Street Go-cart Crash.
I'm aged 7 and on a mission to beat the Go-cart speed record for descending Heaton Street's short but steep hill (where it joins the flat) three quarters of the way down - disaster. With three on-board (designed for one), bob sleigh style, we are hurtling along at break-neck speed when the steering rope breaks, all three occupants are scattered to the four winds and suffer bruised chins, knees, elbows and knuckles and probably other injuries I can't remember - thankfully no hospital cases
I designed, built and was piloting the cart, more than one thing usually conspire to produce this outcome - cart was over-loaded so not enough room to steer with legs (usually legs + rope was safest set-up), post-crash investigation revealed rope failed because it was old sash-window rope long past its use-by date.
Ah! happy Days.
Regards,
Peg.
Alan go cart crash.jpg
 

Peg Monkey

master brummie
Hi Carolina, I lived in Heaton Street for the first 10 years of my life but I can't remember this building at all, pic can't be all that old - Morris 1000 Traveler in shot, looks like Whitmore St end of street, can you date picture?
Regards,
Peg.
(PS Simons Mission seems remarkably similar to Seaman's Mission??)
 

Peg Monkey

master brummie
Hi Folks, I was born 1949 in Heaton St and lived there until 1959, our house (me, my parents and grandparents) fronted Heaton St and was up-market in that we had our own WC in the back yard, there were 8 back to backs behind us who shared 2 outside WCs. My grandfather was a jeweller and after losing his job at 60 became self-employed, he set up his Peg (workbench) in the front room and made gold-based items, mainly rings. He was quite an imposing man, over 6ft tall and with a wooden peg leg (result of botched tendon surgery), his leg permanently set at a right angle at the knee, didn't seem to hold him back, he was a successful fisherman winning many prizes in contests (Member of the club at The Bull on The Flat). I was three when he died but still recall visits to Johnson Mathey Bullion Dealers in the Jewellery Quarter with my mother to buy gold bars for his work. I was fascinated by his tiny scales and weights and imagine I was a right pain when he was trying to work (Bit of a clue to something there!).
Regards,
Peg.
 

Peg Monkey

master brummie
Hi Folks, for the 10 years I lived in Heaton St, from 1949, the street, from the rear entrance to Icknield St School towards The Flat, was very much road of two halves. The school side were more upper market properties owned by private landlords (and I guess there must have been some owner-occupiers) and my side was the council owned properties. The private houses seemed, in may cases, to have a more transient population and I developed a friendship with a lad about my age (8 or 9) who lived in one of those houses, his family seemed quite well-off (he was always smartly dressed and seemed to want for nothing in the toy stakes), I never knew which school he went to (it may have been a private school, dose anyone know where the nearest private school was in 1957?).

Anyway, I, like most of my contemporaries, was heavily engaged in building Airfix plastic kits, I remember the first one was a German Stuka (I just liked the look of it), they cost 2/- from Woolworth's which for me then was about 2 weeks pocket money. I'd built a few of these planes by now and they were proudly displayed on my mantlepiece. I thought my friend over the road might like one to display on his dressing table so I procured a Spitfire with 2 weeks pocket money and after I had assembled it I proudly took it to his house, he was alone (probably illegal at aged 8) and knocked on the door.

He answered, I explained what I had done and he was delighted. He asked me in and I followed him upstairs, those houses had a nice long landing and I watched him carry my precious Spitfire, complete with a stand, to a chest of drawers at the end of the landing where he carefully placed it down. I wasn't sure what was coming next but I didn't have to wait long - he disappeared into his bedroom and emerged a few seconds later with an air-rifle, he walked back to where I was standing, turned around, took aim and shot the Spitfire to bits!

I was absolutely speechless!

What happened to our friendship after that? Can't really remember but one thing is for sure I never made him any more model planes!

Regards.
Peg.
Must View!:
https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/index.php?threads/peg-monkey-cartoons.48101/page-3#post-616706
 
Last edited:

Peg Monkey

master brummie
Someone has said recently that it is in fact Manchester and not Birmingham. Anyone any ideas?
Hi Carolina, as you probably know by now I spent the first 10 years of my life in Heaton Street - here's my 2pnth for what it's worth, as far as Heaton St is concerned the properties on the opposite side of the road to that on which was the rear entrance to Icknield St School were all 3 story houses with back to backs behind (there were some exceptions like the odd shop and an off-licence, which was happy to serve me at my age of 5 , I took an empty bottle, they filled it and put a paper seal around the stopper so that any unauthorised extraction would be evidenced) that being the case the houses that front the road had a rear entry (gave access to their rear yard and to the back to backs), each side of the entry was a front room window (if you were posh you could I suppose call it the lounge) and then next to that was the front door this was a key feature of the road; as I have indicated before the other side of the road was a different style of house (they may even have had bay windows) and the occupiers were generally better off. In the photograph under scrutiny the house appears to front a road, which means it's not a back to back but fails to me the criteria for a house fronting Heaton St. itself.

There is always the need for caution when relying on memories 57 years old but I'm certain of the front house configuration: front door - window - rear entry - window - front door, as in my go-cart building period I would roar out the rear entry onto the pavement like a thing possessed (I'll never know how I never injured a passer-by, I think my approach echoed down the entry warning of my imminent emergence).

One final point - I don't recognise the style of fan-light above the front door.

If you are still awake, all this leads me to conclude the shot is extremely unlikely to be of a house in Heaton St.

Regards,
Peg.
 
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