• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Guy Fawkes Night.....Memories

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
The best bonfire and firework displays we went to were at Ansells Sports and Social club. The bonfire was massive and we never felt the cold no matter how far away from it you were.
 
W

Wendy

Guest
Yes Wend your right about the council workers dropping off their branches ect. But also the field we had the bonfire in belonged to farmer Juxon (All his land is now built on) and he and the farm workers would also put hedge cutting on to the pile.
Thanks John I never knew the name of the farmer that is so interesting. I loved playing in his fields. I am so glad the negative has bought so many memories flooding back. I remember those bonfires with such pride as my big brothers built it!
 

golightly

master brummie
After the VE and VJ firework/ bonfire displays, things weren't quite so spectacular in the mid to late 40's with our meagre budget, but we did enjoy all the build up so well recalled in other entrys here. Memories--the cutting down of small trees in a local lane ( don't tell anyone ), the calling round the neighbours for combustible junk, our home made 'guy'--when mom would crack her annual joke--by telling the oldman to keep moving about incase he was taken for the guy etc. AND our massive ( not) collection of penny fireworks. One boy told us his dad a spent the enormouse sum of £1 on fireworks--were we envious?--yep! I must mention a special firework we had in 1950--it was made in the image of a fighter aicraft, that you launched from a gate post--it flew right down the length of our garden. Never seen one since.--golightly.
 

caggyken

master brummie
HI ALL
This brings back happy memories. At the end of 40s or maybe the early 50s,its a long time ago,my cousin worked at Wilders fireworks in Greet.
In the months building up to Nov5th her mom ,and my gran used to do outwork for Wilders at her house in Ombersley rd Sparkbrook.
Wilders used to deliver teachests full of unlabled fireworks to the house. There job was to cover the fireworks with the lables. They did this on a
table in the front room in front of a roaring fire.At the end of the night they shook the cloth and all the residue on to the open fire.
No health and saftey in those days. All the fireworks that did not have the lable on right ended up in a large suitcase in our house in
Formans rd Iwas always a very popular kid on bonfire night. Mom also shared a lot of them with my friends, i seemed to have a lot of friends
around Nov 5th.
KEN
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
HI ALL
This brings back happy memories. At the end of 40s or maybe the early 50s,its a long time ago,my cousin worked at Wilders fireworks in Greet.
In the months building up to Nov5th her mom ,and my gran used to do outwork for Wilders at her house in Ombersley rd Sparkbrook.
Wilders used to deliver teachests full of unlabled fireworks to the house. There job was to cover the fireworks with the lables. They did this on a
table in the front room in front of a roaring fire.At the end of the night they shook the cloth and all the residue on to the open fire.
No health and saftey in those days. All the fireworks that did not have the lable on right ended up in a large suitcase in our house in
Formans rd Iwas always a very popular kid on bonfire night. Mom also shared a lot of them with my friends, i seemed to have a lot of friends
around Nov 5th.
KEN
I should think it was dangerous enough working on fireworks in Sparkbrook without having them in front of an open fire
.
...and where's me smilies gorn?​
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
HI OISIN
I Would just like to say that i was trying to think of there name this morning and i just could recall there name
as it was wilders and in the fortys and fifties wilders was the best fire works around especialy for there bangers at a penny each
and we reckon we had the biggest bon fire on lichfield rd aston ; the competion on the stret was between us and the sargegents family
and another family down the gully on lichfield rd we would look up to the skies and see the flames
we was in cromwell terace they was in the gully of lichfield rd next to harold lloyed the cobblers the emediate terace was robbinsons the fuit and veg betwen robbos and diggers news agents we had twenty houses up our terrace and all brought out there rubbish and arm chairs we burt all night at least
15 feet high and about six foot wide and mother kept us in hot spuds and chest nuts exployed as well for all the parents and kids of the terrace
and of course wilders fire works those was the days ; best wishes Astonian;;
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
Yeah, Bonfire Night was a big event round our way too. The Burns family, Irish Catholics, over the road from us had a bigger bonfire but over at our house my brother gave a firework display on top of the outside loo roof - a flat slab of concrete - which always drew a crowd. One of his favourite tricks was to stick two or three of those penny bangers you mention under the dustbin lid and blow it into the air. That always brought a cheer and a round of applause.

Can you remember the days before the event when kids would raid each others stashes of material to burn? You'd wait till they'd gone round collecting it in a barra then go round with your own and nick it.
 

josietrue

gone but not forgotten
bonfire night was a family night in our yard in aberdeen street us kids gathered all the wood spicers fruit shop was great for giving us the boxes all the dads in the yard was in charge of the fire and fireworks and the moms all made jacket potatoes and toffee apples
the next morning the yard was washed down by the moms think all the dads was suffering from hangover
they were great days then in the fifties josie
 

anvil man

master brummie
Bonfire St Florence.JPG009.jpg A bonfire memory of just 24hrs!! Last evening I went to a bonfire and firework celebration locally. The organisers had wonderful imagination and came up with this realistic structure of Parliament building. It was about 40/50yds long faced with cheap hardboard on top of pallets and painted with left over white emulsion. It was a captivating spectacle witnessed by a couple of thousand people who watched it burn to a cinder.
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
A song verse keeps going though my mind on the 5 Nov. Not sure of the words, BUT think it starts with "Try to remember the fifth of November" Eddie you should know this one? John Crump OldProudBrit. Parker. Colorado USA
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
A song verse keeps going though my mind on the 5 Nov. Not sure of the words, BUT think it starts with "Try to remember the fifth of November" Eddie you should know this one? John Crump OldProudBrit. Parker. Colorado USA
#...Try to remember the fifth of November/ Gunpowder, treason and plot...#
 

jennyann

master brummie
Staff member
Here is the whole poem. We used to say just the first verse mostly.
[SIZE=-1]
[/SIZE][SIZE=-1]
[/SIZE]

[SIZE=+1]English Folk Verse (c.1870)[/SIZE] The Fifth of November

Remember, remember!
The fifth of November,
The Gunpowder treason and plot;
I know of no reason
Why the Gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot!
Guy Fawkes and his companions
Did the scheme contrive,
To blow the King and Parliament
All up alive.
Threescore barrels, laid below,
To prove old England's overthrow.
But, by God's providence, him they catch,
With a dark lantern, lighting a match!
A stick and a stake
For King James's sake!
If you won't give me one,
I'll take two,
The better for me,
And the worse for you.
A rope, a rope, to hang the Pope,
A penn'orth of cheese to choke him,
A pint of beer to wash it down,
And a jolly good fire to burn him.
Holloa, boys! holloa, boys! make the bells ring!
Holloa, boys! holloa boys! God save the King!
Hip, hip, hooor-r-r-ray!

[HR][/HR]
Seems that there are also several versions.
 
Last edited:

josietrue

gone but not forgotten
jennyann
great photos i remember 1958 i broke my leg and the kids in the yard dressed me up stuck me in a old pushchair and wheeled me around the streets as a guy good times then
josie
 

paul stacey

master brummie
I walked around my village last night in the crisp cold air, after 40 min's walking, I had not seen one rocket or heard one banger, so different to 31st of October "Halloween", another American import, hundreds of kids . all dressed up and made up, walking talking calling out, 5th November , absolutely dead. How things have changed from my childhood in Brum, whole area full of kids, huge fires, penny for the guy, we planned it for weeks, local moms, made baked potatoes, and sausages. Of course most did not even have telly's in the 50's, let alone mobiles and X boxes , in fact most of us had nothing, not even a bike. They really have destroyed our culture and history in ENGLAND. Paul
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
I agree Halloween is nothing but a waste of time and money. The LAST thing kids need is more CANDY (SWEETS) Some of the so called costumes are lousy. 5th Nov in Brum was something to look forward to. Hot on the front cold on the back, Fun Fun Fun days. On the news in Denver,Colorado a bunch of thugs defaced the Colorado Capital building, Something about Guy Fawkes day protest? In Denver Colorado USA???? John GRUMP Paker. Colorado USA
 

rosie

brummie
My brother used to buy masks for the Guy (from Woolworths? ) They were made of the same sort of cardboard as eggbox trays and were red or orange.
Our neighbours had fireworks last night and some were landing on our flat roof! The squirrel didn't know what to make of the cardboard tubes which landed on the lawn either.
Dad used to put rockets in a milk bottle (pointed away from the house for safety) and there were Jumping Jacks which we put under the dustbin lid! There was always a bucket for "dead" sparklers.
We didn't have many fireworks but it was fun and my Grandparents came round too.
rosie.
 

norfolk brummie

gone but not forgotten
Over the years I have spent a great deal of time in the States, and on my visits I witnessed the growth of Halloween. WalMart and other such stores heavily promoted Halloween into a commercially profitable business venture. I fear that the same thing has happened in the UK. Bonfire Night, Halloween, Christmas, Easter. Every occasion is now just an excuse for a moneymaking, binge buying, dress up, drink up business venture.
The credit cards take a pounding, and then comes the difficulty of paying.

Not much of the real spirit of these once lovable times remain. I am not a kill joy, or a Scrooge.
I loved Christmas. The pillow case, a couple of toys, oranges and a few shiny brand new pennies. It was wonderful. If we did not have the money, we could not spend it, but it never mattered.

Bonfire Night was wrapped up warm, around a small fire, sparklers, candles, a couple of rockets, and then back into the house for baked potatoes, chestnuts and 'pop'. Those days were magical, and have always been lovingly remembered..

Today, everything comes too fast, too expensive, and not really appreciated. Our own children never made a great thing of Halloween,
were taught to enjoy Christmas, Easter, and their real meaning. We still a very good times.

Of course, enjoy yourself, but appreciate the occasion, and spend money prudently. Eddie.
 

rosie

brummie
I've just remembered we had some Indoor Fireworks! There was a little tablet like an aspirin which made a snowstorm when put on a saucer and lit, also a green snake appeared from a small lump of grey stuff. Some special paper was folded like a tiny fan and that formed a Christmas tree shape when lit very much like the ash left from a gas mantle. Also a tiny plastic monkey with a cigarette which puffed!!! It was all packed in a little house-shaped box. Not forgetting Bengal matches!.
rosie.
 
Top