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Good music to listen to on U Tube

adap2it

master brummie
Not my thing in rock..however it is good to know that there is more than one old rocker on BHF.
Dave A
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I can accept a degree of 'pop' music but what I will not listen to are women screaming at me. It seems many do these days and it, unbelievably, is considered worth buying. Equally I am never interested in those, particularly men, who talk at you rather than sing. All that says to me is that they cannot sing!. :eek:
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
I can accept a degree of 'pop' music but what I will not listen to are women screaming at me. It seems many do these days and it, unbelievably, is considered worth buying. Equally I am never interested in those, particularly men, who talk at you rather than sing. All that says to me is that they cannot sing!. :eek:
I agree Alan there is a lot of foreign music,and talking the words on the radio now." screeching" it is not rap.its a row. i think it is trending, to screech. adverts are as bad.woman screeching.the buzz bingo ad,Grrrrr......
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Rock and Roll...The older generation despised the new music, dances, and styles, sometimes calling rock n' roll "Satan's music."

 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
Rock and Roll...The older generation despised the new music, dances, and styles, sometimes calling rock n' roll "Satan's music."
Right "lets rock and roll"
Another early reference to the term “rock and roll” was a 1935 J. Russel Robinson lyric from Henry “Red” Allen’s Get Rhythm in Your Feet and Music in Your Soul,
 

Radiorails

master brummie
My first acquaintance of 'rock and roll' was at a friends home in St. Mary Cray in Kent. My RAF friend had invited me to his home for the week-end much of which was spent in London.
It was a memorable time. At his home I saw a tv which has a clock and mice, circulating it on the screen, with Bill Haley singing 'Rock around the clock'. All new to me - I was not yet 18 years old. The other memorable moment of the week end was a visit to Westminster Cathedral. That has had a lasting impression upon me.
Actually I watched the Vigil Mass from Westminster Cathedral last evening. This morning I have watched a Mass from Lourdes.
In these curtailed periods of our life, technology is a tremendous bonus..
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
my first was going with my mom to see "rock around the clock" at the Aston cross picture house .all the teds got up and started dancing in the isles. it was bedlam. but great fun to watch
:)
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Ah, Bill Haley at the Gaumont in Steelhouse Lane. Shortly before I left Brum, and I believe a few seats were torn up and a few slashed, but it certainly wasn't my kind of music. But musical history is littered with stories of opposition to the music of the young, so nothing is new under the sun. I've watched a few prog rock bands in the past, but it's not really my scene, and I came out with ears ringing for a couple of days and felt that someone had tossed a caber into my chest. I draw the line at rap, which I absolutely detest.

Maurice :cool:
 

adap2it

master brummie
Rock and Roll...The older generation despised the new music, dances, and styles, sometimes calling rock n' roll "Satan's music."

And before R&R, the blues was called Satan's music...I guess that anything that yielded influence other than the church, was considered Satanic. I have often spoke of the fact that we...(us lot) were the first generation to have our own music. Up to this point, we shared and listened to what our parents listened to. It was a real turning point in the role of youth having influence in the market place, becoming a target of the recording media.
Dave A
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Dave,

"we...(us lot) were the first generation to have our own music". I'm not sure that is entirely true because the music of the late 1920s was really what the younger element wanted rather more so than their parents. Their parents were, by and large, much more staid, and as always it is the youngsters - and by that I mean under 30 year olds - that drive the fashions of the day, be it music, literature or fashion. It was, for instance, the youngsters who filled the dance halls of that era.

What the young have had since about 1960 was the easy access to making music - cheap guitars became available, stereo records and the cassettes - and the music was relatively simple to play - very basic chord sequences with no real need to be able to read music. Now the trend is moving away from very simplistic stuff and many of the people making the music are now graduates of music schools. And they are the people that are getting the good well-paid jobs in the music industry. Yes, you can create EDM (electronic dance music) on your computer without being able to read music, but now it is not a case of you being paid to create it, but of you supplying it for free to DJs in order for it to be heard and hopefully someone may think you have a talent there somewhere.

None of the well known clubs in London pay bands, the bands are paying to get heard, and there is scramble in order to be able to have that opportunity. I think it is more of a ratrace now than it has ever been, and very few are able to make a living without having a day job as well. And I'm not talking about jazz, but pop and rock. My apologies for going a bit off-topic.

Maurice :cool:
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
Dave,

"we...(us lot) were the first generation to have our own music". I'm not sure that is entirely true because the music of the late 1920s was really what the younger element wanted rather more so than their parents. Their parents were, by and large, much more staid, and as always it is the youngsters - and by that I mean under 30 year olds - that drive the fashions of the day, be it music, literature or fashion. It was, for instance, the youngsters who filled the dance halls of that era.

What the young have had since about 1960 was the easy access to making music - cheap guitars became available, stereo records and the cassettes - and the music was relatively simple to play - very basic chord sequences with no real need to be able to read music. Now the trend is moving away from very simplistic stuff and many of the people making the music are now graduates of music schools. And they are the people that are getting the good well-paid jobs in the music industry. Yes, you can create EDM (electronic dance music) on your computer without being able to read music, but now it is not a case of you being paid to create it, but of you supplying it for free to DJs in order for it to be heard and hopefully someone may think you have a talent there somewhere.

None of the well known clubs in London pay bands, the bands are paying to get heard, and there is scramble in order to be able to have that opportunity. I think it is more of a ratrace now than it has ever been, and very few are able to make a living without having a day job as well. And I'm not talking about jazz, but pop and rock. My apologies for going a bit off-topic.

Maurice :cool:
its all loud electronic backing music now some ,the jokers cant sing. if they were on the own they would be rubbish. At least that is my opinion.
 

guilbert53

master brummie
This is pretty amazing.

One guy singing all the main songs from the musical Les Miserables (men's AND women's songs).

He plays 9 characters, each shown in a little "box" and the video is so well made that while he is singing in one "box" he is often looking at the "box" of the person or people he is singing to.

His name is Nick Pitera and he had made a number of similar videos (Phantom of the Opera etc).

 
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