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General Hospital Birmingham

retroboy19

proper brummie kid
Hi can anyone help me locate the final resting place of my dads sister Annie Randell who died 21/12/1927, she died at the 28 Loveday Street Birmingham and was only 5 months old.Was the address Lveday Street Hospital and if not can anyone tell me who lived their?
The family home at the time was at 83 Lancaster Street which is located just over the road where General hospital was,now i believe is the childrens hospital, any help anyone can give me would be most appreciated.
I am also looking for the final resting place of my dads aunt who was also Annie Randell who died accidental death on 21/11/1908 at Birmingham General Hospital and the family lived then at 13 Court 7 House Lancaster Street.

Thankyou
 

Colin B

gone but not forgotten
retroboy, your assumptions are correct, 28, Loveday Street was the generic address for Loveday Street Maternity Hospital and the old General hospital is now the Children's Hospital.

Colin
 
W

Wendy

Guest
I have checked the indexes Key Hill and Warstone Lane cemeteries with no luck. It is possible they are in Witton cemetery.
 

retroboy19

proper brummie kid
Hi can anyone help me locate the final resting place of my dads sister Annie Randell who died 21/12/1927, she died at the 28 Loveday Street Birmingham and was only 5 months old.Was the address Loveday Street Hospital and if not can anyone tell me who lived their?
The family home at the time was at 83 Lancaster Street which is located just over the road where General hospital was,now i believe is the childrens hospital, any help anyone can give me would be most appreciated.
I am also looking for the final resting place of my dads aunt who was also Annie Randell who died accidental death on 21/11/1908 at Birmingham General Hospital and the family lived then at 13 Court 7 House Lancaster Street.

Thankyou
I have tryed Witton for both burials but have drawn a blank,thanks wendy for looking and Colin confirming that 28 Loveday Street was the Maternity Hospital, im not sure where else to try for these burials any ideas?
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
HI There, yes i can recall the old general for the simple fact that when i got knocked down on aston rd north outside the astoria pic in1954
which became the atv studios when the surgeon witness me be knocked down in a hit and run a well operated on me at the general where he worked
and sen me through back to life ; but what was funny my grand dad ; came out of the general the day before after havening is toes removed and the following day i was taken into there and the same ward and the excact same bed he left from ; coincenced or what ; faith may be ;?
they say your patteren of life is made out for you ; ha;
best wishes astonian ;;
 

ipi0avs

New Member
Large Monument.jpg
Hi All,
I wonder if anyone has any information about what happened to all the administration and archives for the general hospital when it was closed. I am trying to trace an endowment that was left in the care of trustees at general hospital and I'm not sure where to begin! The fund is made reference to on this monument to David Owen in the entrance to Birmingham Cathedral.
Any help would be much appreciated,
Anna
Birmingham Cathedral
 
B

BernardR

Guest
I may be wrong but assume the reference to the trustees was relative to the General prior to the NHS and therefore long before 'The General' was closed to become the 'Childrens Hospital'. There may be a general statement somewhere about formerly local authority or otherwise funded hospitals, that became part of the NHS.
 

ipi0avs

New Member
Thanks Bernard, I will do some more digging, an see if I can turn up a general statement. I am wondering who the solicitors were dealing with the legalities of the hospital closing - I tought it possible that the trusteeship may have been passed into their hands.
 

Colin B

gone but not forgotten
Try contacting Birmingham City Archives or The National Archives both hold documents for BGH from that period.
I know historical documents from two hospitals were sent to Birmingham Archives when they closed.

Colin
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Anna
Cannot help with the endowment documents, but don't jnow if these cuttings may give some background as to where the endowment came from. Apparentlyhe owned a fair bit of property including a pub I've not come across called The Mogul. All are from the Birmingham gazette. The dayes are in the file name.






 

Dennis Williams

Proud Brummie
In the words of the amazing Peter Walker "In pre-reformation days, the care of the sick had been handled by the monasteries and convents, and some institutions such as St Bartholomew's Hospital in London, survived the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII. In Birmingham the General Hospital was our first dedicated hospital, although an infirmary was attached to the Birmingham Workhouse from 1766.

The story of the General starts in 1765 when a local public-spirited physician, Dr John Ash, called a meeting to consider forming a General Hospital in the town. As a result, £2000 was soon collected, and subscriptions of £600 a year were promised.

A site on the corner of Summer Lane and Lower Loveday Street (later occupied by the power station) was acquired for under £1000, and building work commenced, but funds were soon exhausted. In 1768 a music festival was held, which raised £300. It is sometimes said that spare money was short because people had invested in building canals in the vicinity, but money was soon found for rebuilding the burned-out Birmingham Theatre at that time. So the building stood an empty shell from 1769 to 1776, and Taylor and Lloyd's Bank were owed nearly £3000.

Something had to be done - meetings were arranged, house-to-house collections were made and a second music festival was held in 1779. The building was finished, and finally opened at Michaelmas that year. According to William Hutton, whose 'History of Birmingham' was published soon after, in the first nine months of activity, 529 patients were admitted, of which 303 were cured, 93 relieved, 112 remained on the books, five died, and one was dismissed as incurable. In 1790 two new wings were built and in 1792 thirty more beds were endowed by Samuel Galton.

As Birmingham grew in size, the hospital could not grow fast enough. By 1842 it had 222 beds, and from 1857 fetes were held at Aston Hall, which raised funds for two more wings. Another important source of revenue was the Hospital Saturday Fund, initiated by Dr Miller, Rector of St Martin's Church, which brought in about £5000 every three years.

Meanwhile the Queens Hospital and medical school in Broad Street had opened in 1840, again as a result of public subscription and donations. Other specialist hospitals opened - the Orthopaedic Hospital in Great Charles Street (1817), the Eye Hospital (1824), a Lying-in Hospital (1842), the Ear and Throat Hospital (1844), the Dental Hospital (1857), the Children's Hospital (1862). and the Women's Hospital (1871). Together Birmingham's hospitals treated over 46 000 patients (including 3800 in-patients) per annum in the 1860s.

By the end of the 19th century, conditions at the old General Hospitals must have been cramped, and it was decided to build new premises on the present site, then a slum-clearance area at the corner of Steelhouse Lane and Loveday Street. A competition was held for the design of the new Birmingham General Hospital in 1892, which was won by William Hensman. Often known as the Terracotta Palace, this impressive building in rich red brick and terracotta was opened in 1897, in a style echoing that of the Victoria Law Courts, which had just been built opposite. The wealthy philanthropist Louisa Ann Ryland contributed £200 000 to its construction.

And this 'new' General Hospital is still with us, but now it is a Children's Hospital....



General Hospital Summer Lane map.jpgGeneral Hospital old.jpgGeneral Hospital map 1830.jpgGeneral Hospital 1830.jpgGen Hospital Summer Lane.jpgfile.jpgfile-2.jpg31444845_2141703792729047_5206219855673425920_o copy.jpg
 
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Edifi

master brummie
First time I had to visit the hospitalwas in1948.with a broken wrist after I fell over at Happy Valleyby the Canal

up Kings Heath way while minnow fishing.
 

mandys519

New Member
Hi, I am trying to find some information about a James Scragg that died in the Birmingham General Hospital in 1854. Does anybody know of any patient records for that period please? I grew up in birmingham but now live in Somerset so not easy to 'pop in' to the Central Library. Any information would be much appreciated. Thank you
 

suemalings

master brummie
Do you have his death certificate? There are a lot of James Scraggs showing on Ancestry. Do you want any other information, if so do you know his date of birth, or parent's names?
 

williamjukes

master brummie
One of my ancestors passed away in Birmingham General hospital in 1839 and i was able to view his patient records which were held in the Archives department at Birmingham Central Library.

I did have to arrange a prior appointment in order for them to have the records available for me upon arrival.

Maybe you could write to them first to check if they hold the records for that year and for the person you are looking for.

William.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
I hope someone on the Forum can help with this question...….when I used to visit the Hospital for an injury or something, there were nuns there with a really (or seemed that that way) tall habit. Does anyone recall them and would you know what order they might be?
 

Radiorails

master brummie
A habit is an item of clothing worn over the shoulders, rather like a long tabard. It is an 'apron', for want of a better description, used when at work which keeps other clothing clean. In cloister or chapel they are not usually worn.
There are a few items which consist a headdress for enclosed nuns, coif, wimple and veil are the three traditional parts. Many women today are non enclosed and work in many areas without the usual associated style of clothing and headdresses. Nurses uniforms, until recent years were based on those of religious orders.
 
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mw0njm.

brummie dude
My mom was the cleaning supervisor at the general in the fifties the matron use to come round to check that all the work was done if it wasn't they had to do it again with no extra wages they should try that today
i remember them cleaning. what a nice clean hospital. the smell, of carbolic and surgical sprits. last tIme i went in there was 1994 when a dentist in KINGHURST broke my jaw.
Birmingham General Hospital - Wikipedia
 
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