• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

gangs of birmingham

philbee

birmingham born and bred
just bought the book gangs of birmingham and as i am reading it a lot of the streets appear on this website around aston/nechells and city central area the stories relate to the practice of slogging (stone throwing at each other and strangers) and the peaky blinders now i know it is stories of a different age namely victorian era and times were harder but i wonder how common these practices were in reality because it paints a picture of a very lawless society back then and not one for the law abiding citizen or did the press of the day make more of it than there was?
any comments phil
 

maggieuk

The Fairybrain of Brum
thanks Phil.. this thread has been on before,,i don't think that the press did make more of it than it was ..i for one (after reading the book )would not have liked to have been in Brum at the time ..we all tend to look at the past with rose coloured specs and this book makes you realise that it was not like we imagine
 

sheri

master brummie
I am also reading 'gangs of birmin gham' - many of my families lived in the Cheapside and Watery Lane areas - I think now that in those Victorian days they were probably quite rough - how could boys living in those places not be caught up in slogging?
Sheri
 
N

Neville Philpott

Guest
Also, i don't think there was much of a police presence at that time, they probably didn't have the numbers available to patrol thoroughly.

A bit like today, come to think of it....
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I gather, from the posts made here, that the book refers to the Victorian era and probably the latter part of the 19th. century.

However my father told me that a good fight was often to be had in the Bull Ring when Sir Oswald Moseley and his blackshirts held a rally there.
 
M

maxwell bullivant

Guest
thanks Phil.. this thread has been on before,,i don't think that the press did make more of it than it was ..i for one (after reading the book )would not have liked to have been in Brum at the time ..we all tend to look at the past with rose coloured specs and this book makes you realise that it was not like we imagine
I totally agree with you Maggieuk, i read the book when it first came out ( and on the 1st thread said that the " peaky blinders " talked about in this book, were despicable mongrels, ( i know i had 2 great uncles that were Mongrels) We love to read about such things ,,,,,,, but not if you were on the receiving end of nothing more than what were thugs . Max
 

fatfingers

master brummie
Werent 4 Peaky Blinders hanged for murdering a policeman in Navigation St ?

Sure I read it somewhere, but cant find any mention of it on t interweb.
 
M

maxwell bullivant

Guest
I will look it up in the book Fatfingers, certainly a police man called Pc Lines ( if i remember right ) was killed by "sloggers" the fore runners of Peaky Blinders. Max
 

sheri

master brummie
There were also fights between gangs of Teddy boys in the fifties so n othin g new. According to the book the police seemed few an d far b etween. Of course not the communication they've got now.
Sheri
 

Di.Poppitt

master brummie
In the 50's I was at a dance at ICI in the sports pavillion and it was rumoured that Teddy Boys were on the way, we all went home. When I told my father he related just how afraid people were of the Chain Gangs in the 20's when he was a young man. Not a lot changes does it, Now we don't go out alone at night as we none of us feel safe.
Having said that I think those of us who grew up in the 50's were lucky, we could go anywhere quite late at night with no fear of being attacked. Ted's usually fought with each other and left everyone else alone.
 

paul stacey

master brummie
I remember the ted's in the town they tended to fight between themselfs abeit with "chains ,flick knifes, knuckel dusters and open razor's, but you would see the same blokes helping old ladies and women with push chairs off bus's, so no never felt afraid in the 50's/60's.
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
The king standing teddy boys used to go to town and and come into aston in the fifties for trouble
and there weapons was the old bed springs and there buckle belts studded and the old summer laners and the astoners used to chase them back
just like the fewtrells chased the londoners back out of the rum runnerback down theold smoke we are a hardened bunch us brummies take no stick take no prisoners
best wishes astonian
 
E

Elizabeth Redmond

Guest
The king standing teddy boys used to go to town and and come into aston in the fifties for trouble
and there weapons was the old bed springs and there buckle belts studded and the old summer laners and the astoners used to chase them back
just like the fewtrells chased the londoners back out of the rum runnerback down theold smoke we are a hardened bunch us brummies take no stick take no prisoners
best wishes astonian
Now I heard about that, it would seem they thought they were going to take over the night clubs of Brum, but went away tails between their legs.
 

sheri

master brummie
In Gangs of Birmingham the first picture shows Vale Court - would this be off Vale St? This is where my gt.grandparents lived and I guess had a blacksmiths there??
Sheri
 
Top