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Film cameras

Eric Gibson

master brummie
I acquired a couple of Russian cameras and sold them at a profit when film was still in fashion. 'Zenit' if I remember correctly
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
Kodak Brownie was all we used in the 1950s I still. have a Canon tele lens etc. One big problem I do have is that we took in the 60s 70s etc a lot of SLIDES loved to spend hours playing them on the round cartridges on the wall at home at night. Now we have to have them converted to PC discs a real pain
 

devonjim

master brummie
This story has a tenuous Birmingham connection!
Being somewhat ham fisted I enjoy watching the TV programme "The Repair Shop". I greatly admire the skills of the craftsmen and women. I have owned cameras for nigh on seventy years but until today I had never heard of a Telephot Button Camera. This evening's programme featured such a camera made at the beginning of the C20 which had been used by a street photographer on the Lickey Hills (the Birmingham connection). The camera had been made in Blackpool by The British Ferrotypie Co.
Screenshot (276).png
Not even sure if this qualifies as a film camera as it produces the image as a positive and so reversed.
 
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Edifi

master brummie
Old Brit ,got a load of slides.My girls with the European Cup in 82,And Tyseley Steam Trains.Would love to get them on discs.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
One useful thing with smartphone cameras is ... if you are in an airliner about to crash you can video it.
A large flock of seagulls hit the aircraft and caused both engines to fail shortly after take off from Moscow.

Source
Showing more videos ...
 

mbenne

master brummie
Alan,

I well remember the Brixham replica from certainly pre-1980 and thought then that I wouldn't like to go to sea in it! Shame about the parrot & the monkey - always the innocent that suffer.

Maurice
This was the Golden Hind on Sunday (Replica No.2 below). The first replica I remember seeing was in the 60s while on holiday with my Mom and Dad. This was originally made for TV and featured in the 1960s TV series Sir Francis Drake. (A very memorable series for me - Mom always bought my school shirts a couple of sizes too big (to grow into) so I had very baggy sleeves which I thought looked rather like Captain Drakes!). Happy days!

In the 60s a larger than life character paraded Brixham town as Captain Drake (in summer at least), he lived the part as he spent most of his time on board and would roam the streets at at all hours dressed in sea boots, sword strapped to his waist wearing a jacket made of the brightest red and green leather. He was addressed by everyone as Cap'n, even my Dad, which made me cringe. I went went aboard with my Dad on one occasion and the 'Captain' was sitting on deck tapping oakum into the decking with a hammer and chisel, which he described as caulking. After the demonstration he took us down below and showed us around and brought our attention to an unusual feature in the hold - a prop shaft! This he told us was originally attached to an engine which conveniently manoeuvred the ship around during filming, being easier than using sail to position the ship. Years later, around 1988, we took our eldest son to Brixham but the ship was no longer there. By now it was partially submerged and attached to a buoy in Dartmouth Harbour, having sunk when being taken for a refit in 1987. It was after this that replica 2 was built as Radiorails mentioned. In the harbour it still looks the part but for me it has lost a lot of the original detail, particularly below the water line and......spot the Hind on the bow!

It was put up for sale in 2018 and there were rumours about it being moved to Plymouth - there was also an offer from San Francisco. Having now been bought by a local resident it is to remain in Brixham as a condition of sale.

First episode of Sir Francis Drake -
The Golden Hind sinks a Spanish ship and prisoners are bought aboard. Among them Countess Inez (Natasha Parry) who plans to repay Drake's kindnesses by sinking his ship using a long fuse made by Roberto (Warren Mitchell) from her cabin to the ship's gunpowder stored below. Drake evacuates his ship as time for its sinking comes close, staying on board with the Countess. Also starred Clifford Elkin as Don Antonio.

Pictures, Golden Hind 1968, Dartmouth 1987, and March 2020

1584988567718.png
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Kodak Brownie was all we used in the 1950s I still. have a Canon tele lens etc. One big problem I do have is that we took in the 60s 70s etc a lot of SLIDES loved to spend hours playing them on the round cartridges on the wall at home at night. Now we have to have them converted to PC discs a real pain
my dad had a old brownie. for years. great tool
 
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mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
The Casio camera seen in #8 was bought in 1999. It used AA batteries and old style Compact Flash memory cards. It was too large to fit in my pocket when visiting the grandkids so I bought a compact and the Casio lay unused. Recently I put some new batteries in but a message showed 'need to format the memory card' and it would not.
It took quite decent close-up photos as shown below.
View attachment 134741
loverly pic
 

RobT

master brummie
Kodak Brownie was all we used in the 1950s I still. have a Canon tele lens etc. One big problem I do have is that we took in the 60s 70s etc a lot of SLIDES loved to spend hours playing them on the round cartridges on the wall at home at night. Now we have to have them converted to PC discs a real pain
If you set up our modern day camera on a sliding locking mechanism, have a white background, shoot on a bright but cloudy day, you can shoot a hundred or more in a short time, load memory card straight into photo program or view on PC straight away. Lens not shown extended, due to having to have 2 cameras to take shot, one battery was flat.
Just seen message #20 of this thread, oldMowhawk said the same thing, but used a wooden jig.
P1030007a.jpg
 
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Williamstreeter

master brummie
This story has a tenuous Birmingham connection!
Being somewhat ham fisted I enjoy watching the TV programme "The Repair Shop". I greatly admire the skills of the craftsmen and women. I have owned cameras for nigh on seventy years but until today I had never heard of a Telephot Button Camera. This evening's programme featured such a camera made at the beginning of the C20 which had been used by a street photographer on the Lickey Hills (the Birmingham connection). The camera had been made in Blackpool by The British Ferrotypie Co.
View attachment 136134
Not even sure if this qualifies as a film camera as it produces the image as a positive and so reversed.
devonjim I totally agree with you about The Repair Shop
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Pete,

You can still get 35mm film, but with a bit of difficulty and it is quite expensive. You can still send it away to pro labs to be developed, but many of the keen types still using film tend to develop there own. But similarly the chemicals are now quite expensive and not easy to come by. Quite a few of the guys on here https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/ still use film and will be happy to point you in the right direction.

Maurice :cool:
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Dude
Pete,

You can still get 35mm film, but with a bit of difficulty and it is quite expensive. You can still send it away to pro labs to be developed, but many of the keen types still using film tend to develop there own. But similarly the chemicals are now quite expensive and not easy to come by. Quite a few of the guys on here https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/ still use film and will be happy to point you in the right direction.

Maurice :cool:
thanks our maurice:)
 
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