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Electric Trams

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
There was a major power failure on 20th March 1951 as mentioned on Robert Darlaston's website see link below. Need to scroll down it to see a Birmingham Mail report.
Wow what a great link and great read.
80 miles of track that number surprised me I would have put the number much higher.
The picture of the Rednal terminus was a gem those rails where still there into the 80s along with some of the old posts where the shelters stood.
The heyday being the 30s was a surprise also even though the system lasted till the 50s the glory days were really short and with out the outbreak of war I am sure their life span would have been even shorter.
I missed out on trams and when I left England in 80 steam was big but not trams or old buses.
 
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DavidGrain

master brummie
I know that the Docklands Light Railway is not technically a tramway but I can recount an experience I had many years. I was on a DLR train which failed foul of the triangular junction at Poplar (the tracks have been changed since then). This was in the early evening rush hour so it brought the entire network to a stop as nothing could pass in any direction. The crewman (I don't know what to call him as DLR trains are driverless) tried to get the train restarted but could not so radioed for help. Another train was sent out from Poplar 'wrong road' to help. They tried to couple the two trains together but couldn't because we were on a bend on a viaduct and the tracks were canted to enable the trains to run at full speed round the bend and so the couplings would not mate. The train was made up of two units so in the end the crewman isolated the controls of the front unit and asked permission to drive the train manually from the rear unit. And that was how we got to Poplar.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Those Midland Red's look like the BHA series.
Yes I used to be taken on them as a child on the 188 Beeches Estate route. Always liked them.
There is a pic in the Birchfield Road thread of one following a No 6 tram.
A sunny day in Birchfield Rd between Trinity Rd and Six Ways. A No 6 tram with no adverts on it and a Midland Red FEDD following it in the distance.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Until the CEGB nationalisation of 1947, the city had its own electricity generating station.
A little about it here:
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Wow what a great link and great read.
I missed out on trams and when I left England in 80 steam was big but not trams or old buses.
If you never saw the old trams this film from post#449 shows them. It's a long watch at over 1 hour long. Quality is variable because it was on film. Interesting street views. Probably need to fast forward in places but some nice city centre views.
 
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Lloyd

master brummie
So what would happen when a tram either broke down or got involved in a accident could not continue ?, How did the guys clear the lines and return the tram to the garage.
Along the same lines did they tow the a trolley bus when they needed service ?.
If a tram had just 'failed', it could be towed or pushed by another. If derailed it could sometimes be driven back onto the track by providing an earth link to the track (very carefully, wearing thick rubber gloves!). There was also a tram bbreakdown wagon (see pic) which could tow them, and with its crane even right them if they had turned over.
Trolleybuses were maintained in the depots, but major repairs were done at the tram works in Kyotts Lake Road, and they could be towed (like a bus) or even drag a 'skate' in the tram track and be driven there. That is the way the Nechells route trams got from Washwood Heath depot to Nechells Green where they joined the route.

Here's a film of a broken tram in Blackpool, which needs recovery - and some of the overhead wire needs repair too. The 'engineering car' can run off the power wire, but also has a diesel engine so the power can be tuned off during the repairs.

 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
If a tram had just 'failed', it could be towed or pushed by another. If derailed it could sometimes be driven back onto the track by providing an earth link to the track (very carefully, wearing thick rubber gloves!). There was also a tram bbreakdown wagon (see pic) which could tow them, and with its crane even right them if they had turned over.
Trolleybuses were maintained in the depots, but major repairs were done at the tram works in Kyotts Lake Road, and they could be towed (like a bus) or even drag a 'skate' in the tram track and be driven there. That is the way the Nechells route trams got from Washwood Heath depot to Nechells Green where they joined the route.

Here's a film of a broken tram in Blackpool, which needs recovery - and some of the overhead wire needs repair too. The 'engineering car' can run off the power wire, but also has a diesel engine so the power can be tuned off during the repairs.

Thank you but that can not be Blackpool it's not raining .
 

Richarddye

master brummie
great foo
If a tram had just 'failed', it could be towed or pushed by another. If derailed it could sometimes be driven back onto the track by providing an earth link to the track (very carefully, wearing thick rubber gloves!). There was also a tram bbreakdown wagon (see pic) which could tow them, and with its crane even right them if they had turned over.
Trolleybuses were maintained in the depots, but major repairs were done at the tram works in Kyotts Lake Road, and they could be towed (like a bus) or even drag a 'skate' in the tram track and be driven there. That is the way the Nechells route trams got from Washwood Heath depot to Nechells Green where they joined the route.

Here's a film of a broken tram in Blackpool, which needs recovery - and some of the overhead wire needs repair too. The 'engineering car' can run off the power wire, but also has a diesel engine so the power can be tuned off during the repairs.

Great footage!
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Couple more, John.
Tram 420, a 1912 car withdrawn in 1949 when the Moseley Road trams were abandoned. Rote 42 was from High Street to Alcester Lanes End, via Bradford Street. The tram is shown in the pre 1946 livery, it was re-painted in 1945, the photo being shortly before withdrawal. It os loading outside the famous Morgans sausage building and will turn right into Rea Street.
The second photo appears to be at the junction Bristol Road/Pebble Mill Road, where the Bundy clock was situated. The tram is on 36 route to Cotteridge.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
I do think that if photos have been manipulated , this should be stated very clearly when they are placed on the forum, as this is s HISTORYforum, and not a fantasy one
I removed the image from this thread and place it in the Hobbies thread. You can delete my posts#715 and 718.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The trams on service 71 to Rubery are 737 (1926-1952) which has a grab rail at roof level, for the maintenance peoples use, the other is 532 (1914/15 to 1950-53)They have recently arrived and not yet revered for return to town. Both are in post 1946 livery. The photo has been dated to 1949.
Car 534, has a destination of Pebble Mill Road and that is where it seems to be. There were crossovers at that point.
At Short Heath car 706 (1926- 1952) is ready for town (once the crew has finished chat and ciggies) and clocked their departure with the Bundy clock.
Most of the adverts, apart from Spillers and the Co-Op, refer to Birmingham companies, i.e.Davenports, Loo Bloom, Evening Despatch and Bradshaws (of Cregoe Street). All these have their own thread or are mention in threads already.
 
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