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Electric Trams

Radiorails

master brummie
Before the city ran its own tramway system many private concerns had operated in Birmingham and the Black Country. The Smethwick, Oldbury and Dudley routes became under city operation I believe in 1928. These lines ceased in 1939 replaced by BCT and B&MMO buses.
Wednesbury, West Bromwich, Great Bridge and Dudley were initially, 1909, extended by agreement with Handsworth council but in 1911 Handsworth as incorporated into Birmingham making it now a legal basis. In 1924, at the request of West Bromwich, BCT took over most of their system. Ceasing in 1939 and replaced by buses, BCT and West Bromwich.
West Bromwich, being a neighbour of Walsall wanted trolley buses but Birmingham had other ideas as diesel buses were the thinking of BCT then and in future. The South Staffordshire Tramways were involved in routes and those in the Black Country.
This is only skimming the surface of a very involved tramway network. There are posts in the early Forum days which might interest.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
Before the city ran its own tramway system many private concerns had operated in Birmingham and the Black Country. The Smethwick, Oldbury and Dudley routes became under city operation I believe in 1928. These lines ceased in 1939 replaced by BCT and B&MMO buses.
Wednesbury, West Bromwich, Great Bridge and Dudley were initially, 1909, extended by agreement with Handsworth council but in 1911 Handsworth as incorporated into Birmingham making it now a legal basis. In 1924, at the request of West Bromwich, BCT took over most of their system. Ceasing in 1939 and replaced by buses, BCT and West Bromwich.
West Bromwich, being a neighbour of Walsall wanted trolley buses but Birmingham had other ideas as diesel buses were the thinking of BCT then and in future. The South Staffordshire Tramways were involved in routes and those in the Black Country.
This is only skimming the surface of a very involved tramway network. There are posts in the early Forum days which might interest.
Radiorails………...Thank you for this information!
 

Jonob

master brummie
The puzzling thing here is that the tram shelters are very similar to the ones In Lickey Road. Most tram stops on the route, as far as I can see and remember did not have shelters. The Norton photo does show a hill and whilst the photo crops up a few places, if there is only one master copy, and that was reversed by mistake, then things might fit in place a little better?
I have had a very tiring day, including shopping, so I am closing down now. Maybe an answer will be here next time I look in. ;)
You can reverse a photo but any writing is also reversed which has not happened on the tram advert, regards, John.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Only nine cross arms there, which would rule out "Great Barr". :D

753 built 1928 lasted until closure of the Bristol Road routes in 1952.
Those of us who remember the warm sunny days of summers, either side of 1950 and who travelled to the Lickeys by tram probably remember it as a great experience. Probably not realised at the time, but I am sure, many BHF Members have since reminisced about it. The leafy trees, in the dual carriageway sections, were almost reminiscent of a train journey, moreover the trams usually got up good speeds on those reserved track sections, once past Northfield, as there were not too many stops. The area still had a rural feel to it. A speed of up to 40 MPH, on the narrow gauge of Birmingham gave an exhilarating ride as the car rocked from side to side. I believe there was a vertical movement but that was masked by the sideways movements somewhat. The inexperienced, or nervous, might think that a fast moving tram heading downhill might strike one coming uphill in the opposite direction, but I never heard that it ever happened. On Bank Holidays and busy holiday time Sundays the trams to the Lickeys ran very frequently, such was the popularity of a day out there. Trams were usually well loaded and as some other trams, from other parts of the city, were drafted in to cope with the extra passengers, it became possible - if you timed it well, or were just plain lucky - to get on one of the older trams that had open balconies on the upper deck. It was a favoured place, I can assure you, if you never rode one of these type cars to the Lickeys it was something to remember. You had to board in Navigation Street as any stop on route would mean the balcony was usually occupied. Simple pleasures, in far simpler times. I guess a train ride through the Channel Tunnel might be something to remember nowadays.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Tram and bus crews chat by the Bundy clock in this picture of Rednal on a sunny day in 1952. Trams are being replaced by buses so maybe they were talking about the changes. Trips to the Lickey Hills for kids will never be quite be the same on buses ... :)
RImage12.jpg

And these days but it wasn't a sunny day ...
red2.jpg

The link below opens Streetview ... have a scroll look around, they left a small length of old tram track.
 
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Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
Tram 753 nears the Rednal terminus on a sunny afternoon in the early 1950s. Children chat on the front upstairs bench seat. Multi-bar telegraph poles still in use in the 1950s.
View attachment 136680
So this must have been taken at the very top of Lickey road just before the terminus when the dual carriage way ended, this is the steepest part of the road and if you look to the right of the motor cycle combo unit the grass is Cofton Park behind the fence.

The road goes from a dual carriage way down to a 2 lane road at the bus terminus , and that is where the Birmingham City limit sign is
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
Tram and bus crews chat by the Bundy clock in this picture of Rednal on a sunny day in 1952. Trams are being replaced by buses so maybe they were talking about the changes. Trips to the Lickey Hills for kids will never quite be the same on buses ... :)
View attachment 136804

And these days but it wasn't a sunny day ...
View attachment 136805

The link below opens Streetview ... have a scroll look around, they left a small length of old tram track.
The bus if parked on the wrong side of the street in the first pic and I have no idea why it would be parked on the street as the terminus was huge with lots of parking ?

I remember when the building in the second pic which looks like a car dealer out of business was a petrol station with 2 work bays called Clarks, and the blue building had Pickin's news agent on the right, that was real busy in the morning and at night with all the workers from the Austin's and the road up the side was dirt that's where the paper boys would go to get round the back.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The tram and bus appear to be facing the town direction. I have the impression that the bus is on driver training. All tram drivers, who wished to become bus drivers, did need training and licensing. Tram 535, a 1913/14 date lasted until the closures (1952/3). I guess it was a weekday as there are few passengers around.
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
The tram and bus appear to be facing the town direction. I have the impression that the bus is on driver training. All tram drivers, who wished to become bus drivers, did need training and licensing. Tram 535, a 1913/14 date lasted until the closures (1952/3). I guess it was a weekday as there are few passengers around.
You sir are correct in the direction of travel, the bus is parked in front of the cottages as they where known, having thought about why the bus was parked there your explanation makes a lot of sense, as to park any where else would have blocked the rails
 

Lloyd

master brummie
Yes the bus is on driver training, it has no route number and 'special' on the destination. On the upstairs side window of the bus and the front upstairs window of the tram is the public notice about the tramway abandonment, and replacement bus services, so this is within the last week of Bristol Rd & Pershore Rd tram operation.
 

Robert Ensor (bob)

master brummie
So what would happen when a tram either broke down or got involved in a accident could not continue ?, How did the guys clear the lines and return the tram to the garage.
Along the same lines did they tow the a trolley bus when they needed service ?.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
So what would happen when a tram either broke down or got involved in a accident could not continue ?, How did the guys clear the lines and return the tram to the garage.
Along the same lines did they tow the a trolley bus when they needed service ?.
As I recall the tram would create a traffic mess depending upon the time of day...Sometimes they could be fixed in place others they were towed. Not sure about the trolley bus.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
BCT had, at every garage specialist breakdown/towing vehicles. A broken down diesel bus could cause as much, if not more, congestion today. Trams were for the most part either in the centre of a road or on a central reservation. In the narrow, often single track streets, most traffic could pass however,the density of roads meant diversions were not usually a problem. Density of traffic was also, generally, less in tram days. As always there were exception to the rule.
 
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oldMohawk

master brummie
The No Perry Barr trams stood at a terminus in the middle of Birchfield Road in Perry Barr. Traffic got past.
from post#363
Regarding some previous discussion about having to board trams in the middle of the road and traffic passing on the nearside, another pic of a No 6 tram at the Perry Barr terminus and a lorry passing it. Those Midland Red buses will soon have pass.
 
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