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Electric Milk Floats

S

Stitcher

Guest
oldMowhawk, if I remember correctly those three wheeler ones that you had to walk with were called Yo-Yo's when I was with the Co-op. They were used on the rounds closest to the depot.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Hi Stitcher,
The photo was a family photo taken about 1951 and I originally posted it in #13 GoTo Post 13
There was some discussion in the following posts and apparently it was the only photo that Wythall Museum had seen and they knew it's make and registration number but did not have a photo. They have had a copy for their records.
The original image in #13 is temporarily not visible because of the Coppermine upgrade.
oldmohawk
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
I remember when an old man had one for his round in Hall green. He was known as Pop Ferris and he prefered to walk than to have a proper electric truck.
 
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oldMohawk

master brummie
It looks like the Midland Counties hand driven milk floats were more 'up-market' than the Co Op floats.
Co_Op.jpg
midland_counties.jpg
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Rupert

master brummie
The picture of the lined up electric vehicles is great as are the others. The factory behind...laundry perhaps...seems to be camouflaged and perhaps this was a new delivery of trucks. Where did the laundry come from that required so many...I suppose hospitals, barracks, swiming baths and the like; although I thought that the latter did their own...but not private houses surely. At least not any I knew.
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
img057~0.jpg

These were the beauties, Morrison Electricar. I worked on one as a bread roundsmans assistant for a short while in the mid fifties. It was based at Stetchford Co-op Bakery and the round I was on was Shard End which meant we had to go over the noisy Bailey Bridge twice a day. I moved to the Dairy Dept after a short while when they still had the horses at Hall Green Co-op milk depot. On the milk I was a spare assistant which meant I did the same six rounds every week on the regular assistants days off. When the horses were replaced I passed my driving test on a Morrison Electricar then left and got a job delivering small amounts of sand, gravel, slabs and general building supplies for W.J.Law & sons Clay Lane near the canal bridge. After awhile I moved up to seven and a half ton tippers then up six and eight wheeler tippers. Then I went onto road transport proper and saw the entire country incuding Wales and Scotland.
 

Lloyd

master brummie
There is one of these restored at Wythall Museum, Stitcher. After bread deliveries finished they had the sides removed to convert them for milk delivery, but that is all now refitted along with the internal division for sliding the bread trays in.
The 'sun visor' above the windscreen incorporates a full-width mirror to see the dangers of small children sitting on the road in front of the vehicle.

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S

Stitcher

Guest
Many people do not undersatand the work these machines coped with. They were fully laden when they left the yard in the morning and they were stopping and starting for up to six - eight hours a day and all day Fridays and Saturdays because the assistant did the deliveries as the roundsman collected the cash. This was improved if the assistant had a driving licence, because he could run with deliveries and finish before the roundsman then go back and help by writing the pink dividend tickets. Some of the rounds were too large for all the milk to be carried in one go so we were met during the deliveries by a large lorry and what empties we had were put onto the lorry and more milk was loaded onto the float.
 
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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Remember the bread van. We always had a milkroll from them. Still love that bread, nice and light, not stodgy and was very easy to slice with handy ridges to guide your knife. Sometimes we'd have a large tin too, the more well cooked crust, the better. I can almost smell the insides of that van. We had our co-op number pencilled on an outside brick near the front door because no-one could ever remember the number. Viv.
 
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BilboC

master brummie
Definitely don't write off the electric float. TNT couriers have been using a large box van delivering around the City Centre for the last couple of years and Iron Mountain were encouraged, by us at KPMG, to deliver our files using an electric vehicle, which they do, extremely cost-effectively.
 

Nigel Edwards

Hotcrossman
Ah, the days of the Electric milk float. I learnt to drive (very unofficially in my early teens) on a Midland Counties Float helping 'Bill' from the Shirley Midland counties depot - I still fondly remember the Reg No: EOA937. This was a Saturday 2/6 job enabling me to buy the "Eagle" every week. On one occasion 'our' usual float was not available and was substituted by a 3 wheel cart job and I remember only just making it back to the depot along Stratford Road, after a long day around Hall Green. Already a 'bus nut' my future seemed mapped out - driving all sorts of vehicles and yes, I became a bus driver after leaving the RAF & MT 'heavies', later Coaches but those early days still come back from the 'nostalgia box' !
 
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